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Topic: turkey RE: +BBQ Turkey for Thanksgiving (4 msgs / 105 lines)
1) From: MSMB
I haven't been reading my mail too much lately so I am late in getting in on
this thread.  I do a lot of BBQ turkey and I love it but I am not sure it is
the same as putting it in a smoker.  I just use an old Weber charcoal BBQ
and use plain ol' charcoal or maybe sometimes I use some mesquite of hickory
chips mixed in with it. I never use chemicals to start the fires; just some
dried oak twigs from around my house and I am sure that must affect the
taste some. The most we have BBQd is probably a 12 pound turkey and if
smoking is the same then 6 hours is way too much.  On the conventional BBQ
you will probably finish in 2 or 3 hours.  I always baste the turkey in some
kind of sauce, for example honey-mustard or these days I have been trying to
use up a large bottle of a good Asian dipping sauce--and I do this every 15
minutes to 1/2 hour.  This locks in the juices thoroughly and the result is
a very moist turkey.  Sometimes it comes out with a little pinkness inside,
but this should not be interpreted as the turkey being underdone; it is just
from being so moist.  The result is slices of turnkey that are almost like a
moist roast beef.  The BBQ is a really nice way of cooking a turkey,
especially if you are having lots of people over and doing lots of cooking.
It frees up the oven for other things, keeps the heat outside, is faster,
and is delicious.

2) From: Aaron
It was quoted, bbq'ing keeps the heat outside.   well if you are say.... 
in chicago, this time of year.. or further north, then the heat inside 
might not be a bad thing afterall really :).
On that though, smoking is different than a BBQ, it can take a lot 
longer.   Last turkey I did was about 14 pounds and took almost 9 
hours.   Smoking uses lower temps than a BBQ.   The meat will be a pink 
color at times, it's just the reaction with the smoke / way it was 
cooked, and is still VERY well done.  You might also turn the skin 
almost black it will be so brown,  don't let this worry you either, it's 
the way it is when smoking,but oh my god,  it is SOOOOO good.   Word of 
advise though, if you brine your turkey prior to smoking,  collecting 
the drippings to make gravy is probably not a good idea... way way too 
salty...
have fun
aaron

3) From: Tom Gaskell
On Nov 22, 2007 10:21 AM, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
...and that gravy would probably have the flavor and aroma of liquid smoke!
YMMV, but I have never heard of gravy with a smoked turkey.  Maybe I'm
not adventurous!
Happy Birdday,
Tom

4) From: Aaron
Tom the gravy would be to use on your taters or stuffing.  It it 
typically made by taking the drippings from the cooking turkey and 
mixing it with other stuff to make the gravy.  Many times the giblets 
are chopped up and thrown into the gravy as well..... if you use the 
drippings from a brined turkey it tends to be way too salty, the degree 
varying on how well you washed out the bird after the initial soak.  The 
smoke flavor will add to the flavor of the gravy but I have found is 
generally not overwhelming,  the turkey really doesn't start 'juicing' 
into well into the cooking cycle, and I generally put my collection pan 
in after it's at that point so it doesn't get the full slam of all the 
'smoke cycles' I use.
aaron


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