HomeRoast Digest


Topic: The Ol' AP (18 msgs / 541 lines)
1) From: Steve
As a person making single-servings of coffee a lot, I've been using my
Aeropress.  I think this little gimmicky POS might make one of the
best single serving cups of coffee out there.  Quite amazing!  I pour
cold water into my cup, then into the kettle, while it boils I put two
AeroScoops in the grinder, load the paper filter, when the water
boils, turn the kettle off, run the grinder, dump into the AP, pour a
splash of cold water into the kettle to bring down the temp just a
hair, pour into the top of the AP, mix and immediately plunge, taking
care not to squeeze the puck.  Into the sink for the rinse, I take off
the bottom, rinse off the filter, shoot the puck into the garbage
disposal, reset the plunger, rinse of the bottom, put the grill back
on, tap it on a napkin, push the plunger through, rinse and dry the
paddle, and put it back into storage.
Super easy.  Oh yeah, then I pour the rest of the water into my cup.
And the cup it makes, I think beats my TV.  Due to the super-short
extraction time, there is no bitterness whatsoever, unless it is roast
bitterness.  Its got the smoothness of espresso, but the clean body of
drip.
So, does anyone else use this thing a lot and find that on a flavor
basis, it is damn competitive if not cleary beats out most other
brewing methods at your disposal?
Steve

2) From: Frank Awbrey
Hi, Steve. I use the AP exclusively and have been for the past 5-6 months, 2
cups  every morning. Probably gives me anywhere from 10 or 11 to14 oz or so
per cup (2 scoops just like you). Great cuppa Joe. Drinking a Kenyan Auction
Lot P-Berry decaf from it right now. This morning I had the Brazilian
Cachoeira Da Gama Yellow Bourbon. That was one of the smoothest cups that
I've had from the AP. Roasted on Monday. Very good cup. Tomorrow morning I
will drink the rest of the Brazil and maybe a cup of Kenya
AA Nyeri-Karatina, also roasted on Monday.
One quick question on your brewing method. You say that you take care not to
squeeze the puck. What am I missing here? Why don't you squeeze the puck? I
do just the opposite, trying to get the last drip of coffee out of it. So,
am I doing it wrong, then?
thx
On 11/23/07, Steve  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Frank
"Still the one"

3) From: Steve
On Nov 23, 9:28 pm, "Frank Awbrey"  wrote:
<Snip>
Its something I've picked up from beer brewing and tea-making.  In
both of these endeavors, steeping should not be followed by a squeeze
lest bitter tannins be extracted from the grains/leaves.  Is it true
for coffee?  I'm not sure, but just to be safe, I don't squeeze the
puck.  I've not really tried it both ways, so I can't say whether it
really matters in the cup.

4) From: JoAnne Phillips
I bought one about six months ago and never looked back.  I'm the  
only coffee drinker in my household and I indulge in a 20 oz cupa  
first thing in the morning.  I was using a little 4 C Mr Coffee with  
just enough water to fill my cup.  No matter how carefully I cleaned  
it, I could always smell stale coffee in the basket.  I tried a swiss  
gold filter but didn't like the mud in the bottom of my cup.  At that  
time I was using a Cuisinart burr grinder and getting a lot of  
fines.  The little AP cleaned up the coffee and suddenly I could  
taste differences between the greens I was roasting!!!  I have since  
bought a Maestro Plus from SM and I think, for me, this is a perfect  
combination.  I have taken it with me when I travel with a little  
electric pot to boil water and like Tom I pre-grind my coffee (I was  
only gone 4 days) and find I don't lose all that much flavor.  As for  
the TV, I don't know.  I frankly can't justify the expense  
particularly when I have something that makes me so happy.
JoAnne in Tucson, where it is going to feel like 36??? tomorrow  
morning.  What happened to my lovely 80's?
On Nov 23, 2007, at 7:09 PM, Steve wrote:
As a person making single-servings of coffee a lot, I've been using my
Aeropress.  I think this little gimmicky POS might make one of the
best single serving cups of coffee out there.  Quite amazing!  I pour
cold water into my cup, then into the kettle, while it boils I put two
AeroScoops in the grinder, load the paper filter, when the water
boils, turn the kettle off, run the grinder, dump into the AP, pour a
splash of cold water into the kettle to bring down the temp just a
hair, pour into the top of the AP, mix and immediately plunge, taking
care not to squeeze the puck.  Into the sink for the rinse, I take off
the bottom, rinse off the filter, shoot the puck into the garbage
disposal, reset the plunger, rinse of the bottom, put the grill back
on, tap it on a napkin, push the plunger through, rinse and dry the
paddle, and put it back into storage.
Super easy.  Oh yeah, then I pour the rest of the water into my cup.
And the cup it makes, I think beats my TV.  Due to the super-short
extraction time, there is no bitterness whatsoever, unless it is roast
bitterness.  Its got the smoothness of espresso, but the clean body of
drip.
So, does anyone else use this thing a lot and find that on a flavor
basis, it is damn competitive if not cleary beats out most other
brewing methods at your disposal?
Steve

5) From: JoAnne Phillips
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I do the same thing Frank and it doesn't get bitter.  Nothing in the  
directions about not squeezing.
JoAnne in Tucson
On Nov 23, 2007, at 7:28 PM, Frank Awbrey wrote:
Hi, Steve. I use the AP exclusively and have been for the past 5-6  
months, 2 cups  every morning. Probably gives me anywhere from 10 or  
11 to14 oz or so per cup (2 scoops just like you). Great cuppa Joe.  
Drinking a Kenyan Auction Lot P-Berry decaf from it right now. This  
morning I had the Brazilian Cachoeira Da Gama Yellow Bourbon. That  
was one of the smoothest cups that I've had from the AP. Roasted on  
Monday. Very good cup. Tomorrow morning I will drink the rest of the  
Brazil and maybe a cup of Kenya AA Nyeri-Karatina, also roasted on  
Monday.
One quick question on your brewing method. You say that you take care  
not to squeeze the puck. What am I missing here? Why don't you  
squeeze the puck? I do just the opposite, trying to get the last drip  
of coffee out of it. So, am I doing it wrong, then?
thx
On 11/23/07, Steve  wrote:
As a person making single-servings of coffee a lot, I've been using my
Aeropress.  I think this little gimmicky POS might make one of the
best single serving cups of coffee out there.  Quite amazing!  I pour
cold water into my cup, then into the kettle, while it boils I put two
AeroScoops in the grinder, load the paper filter, when the water
boils, turn the kettle off, run the grinder, dump into the AP, pour a
splash of cold water into the kettle to bring down the temp just a
hair, pour into the top of the AP, mix and immediately plunge, taking
care not to squeeze the puck.  Into the sink for the rinse, I take off
the bottom, rinse off the filter, shoot the puck into the garbage
disposal, reset the plunger, rinse of the bottom, put the grill back
on, tap it on a napkin, push the plunger through, rinse and dry the
paddle, and put it back into storage.
Super easy.  Oh yeah, then I pour the rest of the water into my cup.
And the cup it makes, I think beats my TV.  Due to the super-short
extraction time, there is no bitterness whatsoever, unless it is roast
bitterness.  Its got the smoothness of espresso, but the clean body of
drip.
So, does anyone else use this thing a lot and find that on a flavor
basis, it is damn competitive if not cleary beats out most other
brewing methods at your disposal?
Steve

6) From: Frank Awbrey
Thx, for the reply. I thought that squeezing would help get the last drop
out and also maybe push a little bit of the oils that stay on top through.
But, don't know.
Well, JoAnne in Tucson, when I drove home from work today (5 o'clock), my
truck thermometer was showing 32*. My home furnace keeps kicking on and I
only have it set at 64. Must be cold outside, but I'm not checking.
Frank in Flagstaff
On 11/23/07, JoAnne Phillips  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Frank
"Still the one"

7) From: Sandra Andina
Saves my hash (figuratively) when I travel.
On Nov 23, 2007, at 8:09 PM, Steve wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina

8) From: Larry Johnson
I'm late coming into this (on the road I'm not as diligent in checking
my email) but I just want to say, as I sit here in the Holiday Inn in
Warner Robins, GA, with my steaming cup of Idido Misty Valley, that
the AP has made traveling a lot easier for me to take. At home I am
90% french press, 10% Moka pot/ pour-over/ drip pot; on the road, it's
100% AeroPress.
As for squeezing the puck, I bring all the weight that my 225 lb.
frame can muster to getting everything out. When I empty the AP, it
usually ejects a puck that would survive a slap shot, and I get no
bitterness. I am personally familiar with the tannin problem
associated with tea and the grains used in beer brewing, but have not
found a similar problem with coffee.
On 11/24/07, Sandra Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

9) From: Sandra Andina
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I find that if my arm and shoulder alone are not up to the task early  
in the morning, I fold both hands and rest my chin on them and then  
use my head's weight to augment the pressure--steadier, too, sort of  
like a three-point stance in target-shooting.
On Nov 27, 2007, at 10:30 AM, Larry Johnson wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
--Apple-Mail-9-979127275
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I find that if my arm and =
shoulder alone are not up to the task early in the morning, I fold both =
hands and rest my chin on them and then use my head's weight to augment =
the pressure--steadier, too, sort of like a three-point stance in =
target-shooting.
On Nov 27, 2007, at 10:30 AM, Larry =
Johnson wrote:
As for squeezing the puck, I bring all the weight = that my 225 lb. frame can muster to getting everything = out.  = Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-9-979127275--

10) From: Justin Marquez
My sister and brother-in-law live in Warner Robins.  Wave to her if you see
her!
I have mesed with the grind setting a few times for the A/P. A fine grind is
really tough to press out. I usually go to about a fine drip setting and
extract with the A/P inverted.  Then it gets a good controlled extraction
and is a lot easier to press out. I can use a similar amount of grounds as I
would for a french press, too.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On Nov 27, 2007 10:30 AM, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>
--

11) From: Frank Awbrey
Justin or others, what do you consider a fine grind? What is a coarse grind,
etc.? I use the AP and I grind with the Zass, so there is no numerical
setting, etc to judge by. Using maybe the grind in a can of "Folgers", could
you compare? Is Folgers considered a fine grind for the AP or should it be a
little coarser or...?
On 11/27/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Frank
"Still the one"

12) From: Justin Marquez
What I grind for the inverted A/P is a little (but not much) finer than
commercial drip grind coffee.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On Nov 27, 2007 4:55 PM, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
<Snip>
--

13) From: Larry Johnson
On a Solis Maestro (not Plus) I'm 3 clicks away from the finest setting.
On 11/27/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

14) From: Larry Johnson
I saw someone that may have been her and waved, but I got a rude gesture in
reply. Was that her?
On 11/27/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

15) From: Rick Copple
On 11/27/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
<Snip>
My way of dialing in a Zass is to go by complete rotations. I hold the 
nut in place and turn the whole unit, using the sides and corners to 
divide the rotation into 1/8ths. I'll start with the nut all the way 
counter-clockwise, snuggly but not too tightly, where the burrs don't 
turn very easy. I'll then face it so the back is away from me and the 
front with the drawer is in front of me.
Then I rotate the base from there using the side or corner facing 
directly away from me as a pointer reference. These are my general grind 
settings:
Espresso: 5/8ths to 3/4ths
Aero Press: 7/8ths
Drip, moka pot: 1 to 1 1/8th
French press, Yama Vac Pot: 1 1/4th
Old Cory stainless steel vac pot (this seemed the setting that produced 
the fewest fines and a good course setting for me): 1 3/8ths
Being there may be variances between grinders, these may not be exactly 
where you need to be, but might at least give you a good starting point 
of dial it in.
-- 
Rick Copple

16) From: Frank Awbrey
Thx, for the suggestions. I have been drinking coffee a long time but just
within the last year of doing my own roasts, etc. I am just trying to get
some type of idea what is meant by "fine" grind or "coarse" grind, etc.
Thx, Justin, that gives me some kind of idea of what people consider "fine"
grind. And Rick, I think a few weeks ago, you posted the 1/8th turn to
adjusting the grind, which I have been following, although I haven't started
from snugging the burrs down. Right now, I think I've got the grind looking
just about in the neighborhood of a commercial grind, with a few "boulders"
thrown in. But it is giving me a pretty good taste. I don't think I want to
go any finer and maybe just a turn or two (1/8th) coarser.
On 11/28/07, Rick Copple  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Frank
"Still the one"

17) From: Brian Kamnetz
Frank,
I grind with hand grinders, which have no clicks. I start with
tightening the burrs until they stop, then backing off just enough
that they can turn. That gives me a powder, no grit at all. That is a
very fine grind, in my lingo, good for Turkish coffee. My
understanding is that in electric grinders you need a Rocky or better
to consistently achieve this fine a grind.
Then I back it off just a little more, so that there is just a little
grit. That's what I use for moka pot. On rare occasions I use a press
pot, and I back the grinder off a bit more, which of course is a
coarser grit.
Brian
On Nov 29, 2007 10:37 AM, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: raymanowen
I've had the Solis Maestro and the Plus.
I never ground coffee with the Maestro. It was just an educational puzzle,
broken when I got it at the thrift store.
I got the then-current Solis Maestro Plus, new from the Baratza distributor
??Espresso Parts NW?? It had "40 settings," of which I could use eight (8).
Just below Drip, it turned the beans into brown Bon Ami dust.
Just above the Drip setting was a Paisley grind that worked after a fashion
in one of my espresso toys, like the Mr. Coffee pump. I actually made a
couple of good shots with that thing.
I never reset the grind adjustment ring on either of my grinders. That would
have fixed the  adjustment range problem on the Plus, but not the wretched
upper burr. Since it was going to a new home, and my friends, Ray and Naida
only do drip, it worked fine and I didn't have to risk prying the plastic
shroud off the grind ring to reset the adjustment.
Kyle Anderson of Baratza jumped in and sent the Virtuoso burr set. Ray and
Naida said the original SMP was a wonderful improvement over their blade
grinder- how could more new burrs be any better? They found out and were
impressed.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
On Nov 28, 2007 6:56 PM, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>


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