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Topic: Smoked Thanksgiving Turkey Pictures (3 msgs / 96 lines)
1) From: CoffeeRoastersClub
Just to followup on the previous post I did about the Thanksgiving 
Turkey smoke, here are some pictures I took (links shown below).  A 
description of the roast:  From start to finished it took 5 hours 
(from 11:30am to 4:30pm).  After taking it out of the smoker I let it 
set for 15 minutes until I took the stuffing out and carved it.  Per 
family tradition I stuffed the turkey with bread/chopped 
celery/chopped onions/sage/and cooked loose breakfast sausage.  After 
stringing the turkey I basted it with a stick of melted butter, and 
put breadfast sausages w/natural casing between the stringing and the 
turkey (provides a bit of basting action, along with regular basting, 
plus adds a good additional flavor to turkey).  You will note that I 
wrapped the turkey in cheesecloth (soaked with 2 sticks melted 
butter).  This tones down the very very dark color that smoking can 
do and provides a bit lighter smoke taste overall than if not 
covered.  The covering is removed the last 1 hour of the smoking 
process so that the skin can crisp up a bit.  Also note that for the 
1st half of the smoking the bird is smoked upside down; then the last 
1/2 it is flipped and smoked conventional way breast side up.
Enjoy the pictures:http://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/smoker2.jpghttp://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/angus1.jpg">http://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/cheesecloth.jpghttp://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/smoker1.jpghttp://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/smoker2.jpghttp://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/angus1.jpg
(my buddy during most of the turkey smoke)http://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/turkey3.jpghttp://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/turkey4.jpg">http://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/turkeyin1.jpghttp://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/turkeyin2.jpghttp://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/turkey3.jpghttp://www.coffeeroastersclub.com/turkeyday/turkey4.jpg
Len

2) From: Michael Wade
Somehow a few of your links got doubled, but once I figured out to delete 
half I did enjoy the pictures.  After spending all day yesterday cooking 
down the carcass of our bird I would have sworn that I was "turkied-out", 
but that did get my mouth watering.
What kind of wood did you use?  Though I don't have a smoker, I've done a 
bit of wood coals barbequing and here in NorCal my standby has always been 
oak.  I've thought about trying manzanita but never gotten around to it.
I remember doing a Muscovy duck one miserably cold and gloomy day when we 
almost gave up and tipped it into the coals and went to town for dinner (if 
it hadn't been for the brandy somebody passed around we would have...) and 
it turned out to be the best duck I have ever had.
Job well done!
Michael Wade

3) From: CoffeeRoastersClub
Hello Michael.  I think my email program doubled the links.  Sorry 
about that.    The wood I used was about 40% oak, 40% maple, and 20% 
hickory chunks.  I start the firebox with tiny dried maple limbs, 
then throw a log of oak, and a log of maple on top of 
that.  Periodically I throw chunks of hickory in it.
I have found oak to be one of my favorite smoking woods.  It adds a 
heavier taste than maple, and I predominately use it (by itself) for 
pork butt and shoulder  BBQ.  I mix with turkey and chicken.
Len
At 01:18 PM 11/24/2007, you wrote:
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