HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New to Iroast... (11 msgs / 608 lines)
1) From: dvto2
I know people are excited about the Behmor, but for a variety of reasons, I decided the Iroast2 should be my next roaster.? I have used a popper with a switch and a heater and a digital thermometer for several years so I am used to the sights and particularly the sounds of roasting.
One problem I have is that I'm not sure I can hear even the first crack, let alone the second crack with the Iroast.? It may be that I just need more experience to distinguish the cracks from the other sounds going on (the fan, the beans hitting various parts of the roaster).
Another problem is that my Iroast seems to roast hot. I started using Tom's suggested profile but that seemed way too hot. I tried Randy Glasses profile and it still seemed hot.? I am now using the following profile:
1) 320 for 3:00, 2) 340 for 2:00, 3) 375 for 2:00, 4) 390 for 3:00, and for vienna 410 for for 5:00.? For City and City+ I am stopping the roast somewhere in the 4th stage, between 8 and 9 minutes.?? Here's a sample roast curve as measured by the iroast's gauge:
1 minute 302, 2 minutes 313, 3 minutes 330, 4 minutes 336, 5 minutes 336, 6 minutes 342, 7 minutes 361, 8 minutes? 385, 9 minutes 388 for City+.?? 
The weird thing here is that this gage is supposed to be for air temp entering the roast chamber and would presumably be hotter than the chamber and bean temperature.? I get city+ roasts at profile settings of 390 degrees and temperature readings of 388 degrees and vienna roasts at profile temperatures of 410 and temperature readings of 397.?? I suppose my temperature on the machine could be wrong. I haven't figured out a way to get my digital probe into the roast chamber as a second measurement without drilling a hole which I've been reluctant to do. Any insights here?
Thanks, 
David Tobin
Email and AIM finally together. You've gotta check out free AOL Mail! -http://mail.aol.com

2) From: gin
David:
really great question I know one of these guys has an response for but I think ya gotta drill the hole!!
Mike McCan has done one for the Hot Top. I am sure he is around here someplace.
ginny
hang in there, help is on the way...
---- dvto2 wrote: 
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3) From: Steve
You can carefully feed a TC probe through the chamber so its poking
out through the rubber gasket and get a much better red of the actual
bed temp, without drlling any holes.  You'll find the onboard
temperature measurement of the iRoast2 isn't very helpful.  And
inconsistency between iRoasts is very widely reported.
Best of luck!
On Nov 25, 2:48 pm, dv... wrote:
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4) From: Stephen Carey
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David,
Hi and welcome.  Nice to have you here.  You will get lots of great 
advice, so I won't interfere with that, just some suggestions if you 
haven't already done so.  First, I am one of the lucky ones, my 
hearing range is wide and I can hear every crack (I assume) and don't 
have a problem with it.  What did improve things was to move the 
machine a bit further from me so I would hear less of the motor and air flow.
For the temperature, I had the same problem as you, the probe I have 
showed a 20 degree difference on the hot side to what the machine 
said.  When I connected my machine to the ceiling kitchen vent and 
turned it on it solved the problem.  The suction through the dryer 
duct hose from the machine chamber pulled the heat out also and it 
dropped it almost exactly 20 degrees, big difference and I am in fine 
shape now.
Some have cut the screen from the top lid away to get rid of the 
chaff which can block airflow to solid success.  So, there are all 
sorts of answers.  The probe is crucial for me, though I roast by my 
senses the most, from sound, color and smell.  They all come into to 
play.  I just did a melange on a Costa Rica bean and in the second 
roast of it I felt it finishing faster, I could hear the crack moving 
faster than I had planned and I saw the color turning to my end point 
faster than I planned.  All came out fine, I believe, for I just 
ended the roast earlier than I would have thought.  It was also my 
second roast on the machine in two hours - NOT recommended.
Good luck with all of the great people who will step up to help and 
don't be afraid to ask more questions if things don't make sense.
Stephen
At 02:48 PM 11/25/2007, you wrote:
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David,
Hi and welcome.  Nice to have you here.  You will get lots of
great advice, so I won't interfere with that, just some suggestions if
you haven't already done so.  First, I am one of the lucky ones, my
hearing range is wide and I can hear every crack (I assume) and don't
have a problem with it.  What did improve things was to move the
machine a bit further from me so I would hear less of the motor and air
flow.
For the temperature, I had the same problem as you, the probe I have
showed a 20 degree difference on the hot side to what the machine
said.  When I connected my machine to the ceiling kitchen vent and
turned it on it solved the problem.  The suction through the dryer
duct hose from the machine chamber pulled the heat out also and it
dropped it almost exactly 20 degrees, big difference and I am in fine
shape now.
Some have cut the screen from the top lid away to get rid of the chaff
which can block airflow to solid success.  So, there are all sorts
of answers.  The probe is crucial for me, though I roast by my
senses the most, from sound, color and smell.  They all come into to
play.  I just did a melange on a Costa Rica bean and in the second
roast of it I felt it finishing faster, I could hear the crack moving
faster than I had planned and I saw the color turning to my end point
faster than I planned.  All came out fine, I believe, for I just
ended the roast earlier than I would have thought.  It was also my
second roast on the machine in two hours - NOT recommended.
Good luck with all of the great people who will step up to help and don't
be afraid to ask more questions if things don't make sense.
Stephen
At 02:48 PM 11/25/2007, you wrote:
I know people are excited about
the Behmor, but for a variety of reasons, I decided the Iroast2 should be
my next roaster.  I have used a popper with a switch and a heater
and a digital thermometer for several years so I am used to the sights
and particularly the sounds of roasting.
One problem I have is that I'm not sure I can hear even the first crack,
let alone the second crack with the Iroast.  It may be that I just
need more experience to distinguish the cracks from the other sounds
going on (the fan, the beans hitting various parts of the
roaster).
Another problem is that my Iroast seems to roast hot. I started using
Tom's suggested profile but that seemed way too hot. I tried Randy
Glasses profile and it still seemed hot.  I am now using the
following profile:
1) 320 for 3:00, 2) 340 for 2:00, 3) 375 for 2:00, 4) 390 for 3:00, and
for vienna 410 for for 5:00.  For City and City+ I am stopping the
roast somewhere in the 4th stage, between 8 and 9 minutes.  
Here's a sample roast curve as measured by the iroast's gauge:
1 minute 302, 2 minutes 313, 3 minutes 330, 4 minutes 336, 5 minutes 336,
6 minutes 342, 7 minutes 361, 8 minutes  385, 9 minutes 388 for
City+.   
The weird thing here is that this gage is supposed to be for air temp
entering the roast chamber and would presumably be hotter than the
chamber and bean temperature.  I get city+ roasts at profile
settings of 390 degrees and temperature readings of 388 degrees and
vienna roasts at profile temperatures of 410 and temperature readings of
397.   I suppose my temperature on the machine could be wrong.
I haven't figured out a way to get my digital probe into the roast
chamber as a second measurement without drilling a hole which I've been
reluctant to do. Any insights here?
Thanks, 
David Tobin
Email and AIM finally together. You've gotta check out free

AOL Mail! 
--=====================_186304171==.ALT--

5) From: raymanowen
"...this gage is supposed to be for air temp entering the roast chamber and
would presumably be hotter than the chamber and bean temperature."
If you wanted to know the temperature of Hell, you could just take a flight
to Phoenix in July or August and catch a Limousine ride to Scottsdale. Just
wave your thermometer around in the air-conditioned limo and you might
conclude, "Hell is not so hot, even on the outskirts!"
That might be what is happening with your i-Roast. So, what? Just gauge your
settings and readings with the flavor you're getting, vs what you want to
achieve. I just listen to the beans and when they say, "It's Time-" *we
Stop!
*I'm sure there is some sort of countdown that might allow you to stop
heating the beans and just coast in to the roast you want. For Yours Truly,
that would engender a "Don't worry, Be Happy!" with what you got attitude.
Maybe when the Eagle returns- but not right now.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
*
*Murphy is my co-pilot- I'll do the take-offs and landings, thank you.*
*
On Nov 25, 2007 12:48 PM,  wrote:
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6) From: Michael Wade
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
David:
I used an iR2 for a while and did some measurements with a very slender =
thermocouple probe that I could just snake down through the vent holes.  =
With the probe bead just below the air entrance holes in the bottom of =
the chamber I was measuring roughly 70 degrees F higher than the LCD =
readout.  I suspect the "derived" LCD temperature is Hearthware's =
attempt to represent the roast chamber temperature, but who knows what =
the algorithm might be.  I had to stop testing because I was approaching =
the temperature limit of the teflon insulation on the probe (a Fluke).
I pulled the roast chamber apart and snaked the TC lead in between the =
glass and the bottom rubber seal.  It isn't hard to do.
Your profile is reasoably close to what I was using given the notorious =
variation between machines.  One other thing I noticed on my unit was =
that it would stabilize at only a few different LCD temperatures, no =
matter what I set the program to; 350-352, 365-367, 376-380, 405, =
420-423, and then would jump to 455.  It did seem to maintain those =
(indicated) temperature points fairly well by cycling the fan and =
perhaps the elements also, but it would only control to about 6 =
different temperature points.
I would guess you've already discovered the undocumented "dryiing" phase =
in the first 2-3 minutes or so since you're programming the minimum 320 =
for 3:00.
Hope this is helpful,
Michael Wade

7) From: MSMB
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
How do you get so many phases on an I-Roast. Mine is an I-Roast ; is this a
fature with the IR-2?  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael Wade
Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2007 5:00 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +New to Iroast...
David:
I used an iR2 for a while and did some measurements with a very slender
thermocouple probe that I could just snake down through the vent holes.
With the probe bead just below the air entrance holes in the bottom of the
chamber I was measuring roughly 70 degrees F higher than the LCD readout.  I
suspect the "derived" LCD temperature is Hearthware's attempt to represent
the roast chamber temperature, but who knows what the algorithm might be.  I
had to stop testing because I was approaching the temperature limit of the
teflon insulation on the probe (a Fluke).
I pulled the roast chamber apart and snaked the TC lead in between the glass
and the bottom rubber seal.  It isn't hard to do.
Your profile is reasoably close to what I was using given the notorious
variation between machines.  One other thing I noticed on my unit was that
it would stabilize at only a few different LCD temperatures, no matter what
I set the program to; 350-352, 365-367, 376-380, 405, 420-423, and then
would jump to 455.  It did seem to maintain those (indicated) temperature
points fairly well by cycling the fan and perhaps the elements also, but it
would only control to about 6 different temperature points.
I would guess you've already discovered the undocumented "dryiing" phase in
the first 2-3 minutes or so since you're programming the minimum 320 for
3:00.
Hope this is helpful,
Michael Wade

8) From: Allon Stern
On Nov 25, 2007, at 9:48 PM, MSMB wrote:
<Snip>
The IR2 lets you set five phases, versus the original IR's 3.
IIRC, you can only modify the 3rd stage with the up/down buttons once  
the roast is in process.
-
allon

9) From: Michael Wade
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Oops, sorry, yes I was talking about an iR2. 
Not phases, or program stages (of which the machine has 5 available), =
but temperature points that the machine will control to.  For instance, =
If I program the second stage to 350, the machine will heat to 350 =
indicated and cycle the fan to stay there, but if I program 355 I will =
still get 350, if I program 360 I will get about 365, etc.  My machine =
will stabilize at and maintain the nearest(?) one of the 6 control =
points I mentioned.  It's as if you can set your home thermostat to any =
temperature you want, but it will only control the furnace to either =
60F, 70F, or 80F, whichever is closest to your setting.
Michael

10) From: Allon Stern
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On Nov 26, 2007, at 1:36 AM, Michael Wade wrote:
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Bleah.
I didn't realize this. How annoying.
-
allon
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On Nov 26, 2007, at 1:36 AM, Michael Wade wrote:
Oops, sorry, yes I was talking = about an iR2.  Not = phases, or program stages (of which the machine has 5 available), but = temperature points that the machine will control to.  For instance, If = I program the second stage to 350, the machine will heat to 350 = indicated and cycle the fan to stay there, but if I program 355 I = will still get 350, if I program 360 I will get about 365, etc.  My = machine will stabilize at and maintain the nearest(?) one of the 6 = control points I mentioned.  It's as if you can set your home = thermostat to any temperature you want, but it will only control the = furnace to either 60F, 70F, or 80F, whichever is closest to your = setting. Michael Bleah.
I didn't realize = this. How annoying.
-allon= --Apple-Mail-2-892911915--

11) From: Robert Gulley
Yes - the IRiaost2 allows for 10 user programmable and saveable 
profiles, as well as the two built in profiles. This was probably the 
biggest change between the units, as well tighter seals.
At 09:48 PM 11/25/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
"I have measured out my life with coffee spoons."  ~T.S. Eliot  


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