HomeRoast Digest


Topic: i-Roast 2 burns 'em up (26 msgs / 923 lines)
1) From: Pdewalt
Hello
I'm SURE this has been answered before, but as I haven't been privy  
to all the previous gems of wisdom discussed here in the past, I  
wanted to see if anybody could enlighten me as to problem I'm having  
with my (relatively new) i-Roast 2, which I got about a month ago to  
replace the lousy Sirocco roaster I was using.
Right off the bat I noticed that if I used either of the presets the  
beans would roast WAY darker than "dark roast" - more like a French -  
and there would still be a couple more minutes left on the timer.
This trend has continued and is the same no matter what bean I am  
roasting.
I'm not measuring the beans by weight, but by volume - mostly I'm  
roasting a cup at a time.
Also, the ambient temperature around the i-Roast is in the lower 60s  
(I have to roast in the garage to keep the smoke alarms quiet, or  
outside on the back deck).
The clincher was last night when I programmed in a suggested profile  
I found on SM's i-roast tip sheet for a generic City/City+ roast.  I  
was watching the roast carefully, but became unavoidably distracted  
during the last stage.  When I checked back, the beans were again way  
too dark - oily between Vienna and French.  I wasn't expecting that.
I realize I can program profiles that will alleviate the over- 
roasting, but it seems like I shouldn't even be having this problem  
with the built in profiles and certainly SM's City/City+ shouldn't  
have resulted in Vienna.
Any suggestions appreciated.
Oh, and yes, I'm new to this mailing list - pleased to meetcha.
Phil

2) From: raymanowen
From what I've read, I suspect 1/2 cup of green coffee is far too large a
quantity to roast in the i-R2. Try 1/4 cup to start. If that works without
burning up the beans, increment to 3/8 cup and check.
The larger bean loads present a restriction to airflow, so the air gets
hotter in passing the heat coil.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
On Nov 28, 2007 10:24 PM, Pdewalt  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Allon Stern
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On Nov 29, 2007, at 12:42 AM, raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
Naw, I routinely do a full cup.
What you DO have to do is watch the beans, ready to hit the COOL  
button when they've reached the desired level of development.
I just did a batch of Ethiopian Harar using David Tobin's profile,  
posted last week:
On Nov 25, 2007, at 2:48 PM, dvto2 wrote:
<Snip>
Came out to about FC.
I still have some Sumatra Mandheling in the grinder for breakfast  
tomorrow; after a day or so of rest I'll see how it comes out.
(This was the first time trying other than the preset profiles)
The important thing, though, is not to rely on the roast profile to  
terminate the roast - you have to watch, and be ready to terminate it  
when it reaches the level you want.
-
allon
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On Nov 29, 2007, at 12:42 AM, raymanowen =
wrote:
From what I've read, I suspect 1/2 cup of green coffee = is far too large a quantity to roast in the i-R2. Try 1/4 cup to start. = If that works without burning up the beans, increment to 3/8 cup and = check. The larger bean loads present a restriction to airflow, = so the air gets hotter in passing the heat coil. 
Naw, I routinely do a full = cup. What you DO have to do is watch the beans, = ready to hit the COOL button when they've reached the desired level of = development.
I= just did a batch of Ethiopian Harar using David Tobin's profile, posted = last week: On Nov 25, 2007, at 2:48 PM, dvto2 wrote:1) 320 for 3:00, 2) 340 for 2:00, 3) 375 for = 2:00, 4) 390 for 3:00, and for vienna 410 for for 5:00.  For City and = City+ I am stopping the roast somewhere in the 4th stage, between 8 and = 9 minutes. 
Came out to about = FC. I still have some Sumatra Mandheling in the grinder for = breakfast tomorrow; after a day or so of rest I'll see how it comes = out.
(This was the first time = trying other than the preset profiles)
The important thing, though, = is not to rely on the roast profile to terminate the roast - you have to = watch, and be ready to terminate it when it reaches the level you = want.-allon= --Apple-Mail-2--1032526756--

4) From: John Brown
i am sure people will say use your eyes, nose, and hit the cool button, 
when you think it is just before the roast you want .  there is a carry 
over when internal heat will continue cooking the beans
Pdewalt wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: John Brown
was it the white cup that comes with the roaster?
raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Sandra Andina
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For some beans I can do a cup (abt. 200gm), but for others  
(peaberries, Harar) I have to weigh out no more than 140 gm.  
Otherwise, the fan can't move them and they burn, overheating and  
shutting off the roaster. Glad I use a Behmor now.
On Nov 29, 2007, at 12:33 AM, Allon Stern wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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For some beans I can do a cup =
(abt. 200gm), but for others (peaberries, Harar) I have to weigh out no =
more than 140 gm. Otherwise, the fan can't move them and they burn, =
overheating and shutting off the roaster. Glad I use a Behmor =
now.
On Nov 29, 2007, at 12:33 AM, Allon Stern =
wrote:
On Nov = 29, 2007, at 12:42 AM, raymanowen = wrote:
From what I've read, I suspect 1/2 cup of green coffee = is far too large a quantity to roast in the i-R2. Try 1/4 cup to start. = If that works without burning up the beans, increment to 3/8 cup and = check. The larger bean loads present a restriction to airflow, = so the air gets hotter in passing the heat = coil. 
Naw, I routinely do a full = cup. What you DO have to do is watch the beans, = ready to hit the COOL button when they've reached the desired level of = development.
I= just did a batch of Ethiopian Harar using David Tobin's profile, posted = last week: On Nov 25, 2007, at 2:48 PM, dvto2 wrote:1) 320 for 3:00, 2) 340 for 2:00, 3) 375 for = 2:00, 4) 390 for 3:00, and for vienna 410 for for 5:00.  For City = and City+ I am stopping the roast somewhere in the 4th stage, between 8 = and 9 minutes. 
Came out to about = FC. I still have some Sumatra Mandheling in the grinder for = breakfast tomorrow; after a day or so of rest I'll see how it comes = out.
(This was the first time = trying other than the preset profiles)
The important thing, though, = is not to rely on the roast profile to terminate the roast - you have to = watch, and be ready to terminate it when it reaches the level you = want.-allon Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-4--1030530802--

7) From: Robert Gulley
Hi Phil, and Welcome!
There are far more experienced people here than me, but I have always 
taken the roasting profiles as starting points. I have yet to let a 
roast go full term - I always watch it closely after the point where 
there is 4 minutes or less left. I find myself (using basically Tom's 
profile from the tip sheet) stopping the roast somewhere between 2:30 
and 1:30 to go - never longer, and rarely shorter. I am sure you know 
this, but just in case, you stop the roast by hitting the "Cool" 
button. This has worked well for around 40 roasts so far, not one has 
been burnt.
Hope this is of some help -
Robert (RG)
At 12:24 AM 11/29/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
"I have measured out my life with coffee spoons."  ~T.S. Eliot  

8) From: Robert Gulley
Phil
Just a follow up - if you don't have a scale to measure by weight, 
use slightly less that two scoops from the included white scoop that 
comes with the IR2. This approximates the amount of beans you want to 
roast at one time.
Robert (RG)
At 12:24 AM 11/29/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
"I have measured out my life with coffee spoons."  ~T.S. Eliot  

9) From: Loyd Blankenship
I've probably done 30 or so batches in my iRoast 2 now -- I use profile 
#2 and the cool button, and it *never* gets to the end of the cycle. I 
go strictly on appearance and sound. I'm doing mostly City, FC, and 
French roasts, depending on the bean and intended audience (my wife 
makes drip coffee every morning, whereas I'm on the Silvia all day 
working at home).
I always use a triple-beam to measure out exactly 150g of beans so that 
I'm only dealing with one variable at a time when I make changes. It has 
taken me quite a few roasts to get the feel of the carryover heat after 
cool is hit, but I can now hit pretty much whatever roast I want with 
it. There are very small windows for getting the lighter roasts rights, 
but they're there.
loyd

10) From: Pdewalt
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Yeah, it's the white cup I'm using - typically two scoops.
I realize that I can watch the beans and stop the roast, I am just  
concerned that profiles that are supposed to result in a light roast  
are going all the way to vienna.  It makes me wonder if I've got a  
defective i-Roast, or if my home voltage is out of whack.
Thanks for the suggestions.
Phil
On Nov 29, 2007, at 6:23 AM, homeroast-request  
wrote:
<Snip>
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Yeah, it's the white cup I'm =
using - typically two scoops.
I realize that I can watch = the beans and stop the roast, I am just concerned that profiles that are = supposed to result in a light roast are going all the way to vienna.  = It makes me wonder if I've got a defective i-Roast, or if my home = voltage is out of whack.
Thanks for the = suggestions.
Phil On Nov = 29, 2007, at 6:23 AM, homeroast-request@= lists.sweetmarias.com wrote:

Subject: Re: +i-Roast 2 = burns 'em up

Reply-To: homeroast= s.com

was it the white cup that comes with the = roaster?

= --Apple-Mail-2--1002658550--

11) From: John Brown
my results with the presets on the I roast 2 is the same.  the presets 
will damn near burn the beans if left alone.
Pdewalt wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Sean Sweet
Hi Phil,
I'm a relative newb to iRoast 2, as well (after a year with a popcorn
popper) and can say this.  When I wash the roasting chamber and chaff
collection unit after each roast (in the dishwasher - manual says it's OK),
I can get the lighter roasts, no problem.  The one time I did not wash (unit
looked clean enough to me; thought I could maybe do every second or third
roast) I noticed the temp at same time/stage/cycle running nearly 50 degrees
hotter.   Was aiming for City+ or FC, rather than my normal FC+ and stopped
a full 90 seconds or more sooner than normal, but the beans had turned dark
& shiny/sweaty like French or Vienna and I smoked out the kitchen - even
with hitting cool when I thought right.  The beans were Zimbabwean, so
perhaps I should have done a slower roast or cut even sooner, but I am
guessing the fact I did not wash the unit drove temps up and pushed the
roast far darker than I'd intended.
The profile I use (almost always) is Tom's "Basic" - 340 for 2 mins, 395 for
3 mins and 450 for 7 minutes, hitting cool with 1 min remaining to get a FC+
(right around start of 2nd crack, though I can't always hear it with my
stove exhaust fan on).
Happy experimenting.

13) From: Mike Sieweke
Phil,
Don't believe the iRoast profile temperatures.  They
are poorly calibrated.  I've measured mine with a
thermocouple, and it's 50 to 100 degrees high (as
measured in the air flow).  I have an iRoast 1, but
the behavior is the same as the iRoast 2.
Your iRoast runs hot, like many others.  You can get a
rough idea how hot by checking the temperature readout
at first crack.  First crack hits at around 405 F (as
measured in the bean mass, not the air flow), so you
can take the difference to see approximately how far
off yours is.
Try a slow profile:
   385 for 7:00
   390 for 3:00
   440 for 5:00
Don't let it run the full time!  You must keep an eye
on it and stop it when it's done - probably between 7
and 9 minutes.  Decaf will take a couple minutes longer.
If that profile is still too fast and you never get
into the third stage, try this:
   385 for 10:00
   390 for  5:00
I use this profile for all beans - decaf and regular.
Regular beans finish around 9 minutes, and decaf goes
up to 12.
Sandy,
The iRoast is only rated for 150 grams (1/3 lb).  I
always roast 113.4 grams (1/4 lb) because it gives me
an even number of roasts per pound.
Mike Sieweke
On Nov 29, 2007, at 2:06 AM, Sandra Andina wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: JoAnne Phillips
Phil,
Mike sent me these directions a couple of weeks ago when I was  
pulling my hair out over burned roasts.  He also told me the iRoast  
is programed to not exceed 350 degrees for the first three minutes,  
so you get that without programing it in.  I don't know if this is  
true on the iR2 or not, but I find it certainly is on the iR1.  Also  
it will blow harder under 390, so the 385 will get you a lot of air  
circulation.  I find I get a nice steady ramp on the temps for the  
first 8 or 8 1/2 minutes, so I don't go for the full 3 minutes at  
390, but move up to 440 for the rest of the time and watch the beans  
like a hawk and stop just before I've reached what I want.
I've been drinking roasts that are gang busters in my cup since doing  
this.  I do weigh though, a scale like dieters use can be purchased  
for just a couple of $ at a grocery or pharmacy.  Well worth it when  
you consider how fast you can ruin a pound of good greens.  I find I  
like the 4 oz limit so I never have left over beans from a one or two  
pound purchase.
Hearing the cracks is real hard for me.  Sometimes I hear them and  
sometimes I don't, my next order will include a thermocouple that can  
be threaded into the bowl as I no longer really trust the readout for  
temps on the machine.
For just one or two coffee drinkers, I don't think you can beat the  
iR.  You get enough to hold you for several days and you have the  
pleasure of roasting frequently so you gain a lot of experience real  
fast.  I have been resting my roasts longer - at least three days  
before I start to enjoy.  I just finished the last of a Panama Carmen  
Estate +1800 meters bean this morning that I roasted on the 23rd.  It  
got better every day - I hated to see the end of it.  But, I have  
some I roasted Tuesday that will get opened tomorrow and I will roast  
tomorrow so that three days from now I will again have a new jar to  
open.
I go to bed at night excited about the coffee I will be grinding  
tomorrow.
JoAnne in Tucson where they are saying we will get 3-7 inches of snow  
at our ski lift tomorrow!!
On Nov 29, 2007, at 9:07 PM, Mike Sieweke wrote:
Phil,
Don't believe the iRoast profile temperatures.  They
are poorly calibrated.  I've measured mine with a
thermocouple, and it's 50 to 100 degrees high (as
measured in the air flow).  I have an iRoast 1, but
the behavior is the same as the iRoast 2.
Your iRoast runs hot, like many others.  You can get a
rough idea how hot by checking the temperature readout
at first crack.  First crack hits at around 405 F (as
measured in the bean mass, not the air flow), so you
can take the difference to see approximately how far
off yours is.
Try a slow profile:
   385 for 7:00
   390 for 3:00
   440 for 5:00
Don't let it run the full time!  You must keep an eye
on it and stop it when it's done - probably between 7
and 9 minutes.  Decaf will take a couple minutes longer.
If that profile is still too fast and you never get
into the third stage, try this:
   385 for 10:00
   390 for  5:00
I use this profile for all beans - decaf and regular.
Regular beans finish around 9 minutes, and decaf goes
up to 12.
Sandy,
The iRoast is only rated for 150 grams (1/3 lb).  I
always roast 113.4 grams (1/4 lb) because it gives me
an even number of roasts per pound.
Mike Sieweke
On Nov 29, 2007, at 2:06 AM, Sandra Andina wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Allon Stern
On Nov 29, 2007, at 9:51 AM, Pdewalt wrote:
<Snip>
I would assume that running an i-roast on a variac is a pointless  
exercise. One advantage of a thermostatically controlled device is  
that it can account for variations in heat caused by environmental  
factors as well as input voltage - otherwise, a simple timer would  
work for most operations (okay, for a device with multiple heat  
settings this would obviously not be the case, but I'm making a point  
here - give me some lattitude, not attitude ;)
Does the iRoast maintain temperature by switching a heater on and off  
at full power, or does it attempt to control the heat output by other  
means, such as SCR (okay, that's also switching on and off, but for  
those of you who know electronic controls, you also know what I mean  
by the first part of the statement).
The only thing I could think of is that a higher voltage means higher  
top temperature range, and faster cycle times on the control loop.  
Lower voltage means longer constant heat, lower low temperature range  
at the cost of the top  of the range.
So, any empirical evidence that input voltage makes a difference with  
the iRoast?
-
allon

16) From: Allon Stern
On Nov 30, 2007, at 1:25 AM, JoAnne Phillips wrote:
<Snip>
Absolutely. I'm the only coffee drinker in my house. I find that a  
popper is just about right, but
a) you don't get the ability to profile, unless you use a variac
b) you can't roast indoors without removing the batteries from your  
smoke alarms
c) when you do want to roast more, it gets tedious.
I've started roasting for my office-mate. I also give freshly roasted  
batches as thank-yous to friends and neighbors. Speaking of which, I  
got a ride downtown from a neighbor yesterday; guess I'd better get  
crackin;.
Enjoying some fantastic harrar :)
-
allon

17) From: Frank Awbrey
Allon, I am very much like you. I am also the only coffee drinker in the
house and use a popper. I don't use a variac, I guess I am the variac as I
turn my popper off and on during my roast to lengthen the roast time. Doing
it this way, adds 2-3 minutes to my roast depending on how long/often I
leave it off. But, my problem is that I roast only 2/3 cup at a time and
usually do 3 batches at a time which can be very time consuming (1-2 hrs.).
I figure these three batches lasts me about 4-5 days of coffee drinking
(about 9 cups) using the AeroPress.
I am looking at something that will let me roast from about 1/2 to 3/4 or 1
pound at a time. I have been looking at the hg/bm/db or the sc/to method. I
have recently started thinking about buying a hot plate of sorts to use
outside and roast with my "whirly pop". I would love to get the Behmor, but
I don't think I can talk my better half into spending that kind of money for
my addiction/pleasure ;>). Any suggestions on the mentioned roasting
methods?
On 11/30/07, Allon Stern  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Frank
"Still the one"

18) From: Allon Stern
On Nov 30, 2007, at 10:58 AM, Frank Awbrey wrote:
<Snip>
I only have experience with the popper and iRoast2. For me, the  
iRoast2 was the perfect device. I really would have been happy to  
continue with the popper except that it was getting too cold to roast  
outside - the motivating factor was the ability to run the machine  
inside and vent the exhaust. The batch size is comfortable.
For larger batches, HG/BM/DB may be the way to go - but I have no  
experience with these methods - others on the list will surely speak up.
-
allon

19) From: CoffeeRoastersClub
The Whirly Pop (is is stainless steel now?  mine is aluminum based) 
is a great way to roast a pound of beans.  And if you have a kitchen 
hood that evacuates the roasting smoke to the outdoors, you have a 
one pound roaster fully temp adjustable roaster you can use indoors 
for only about $15 if that.  Very cost effective if you ask me.
Sure it may take a small bit of trial and error to get over the 
learning curve, but not much more that popping corn!
Len
Coffee and Stuff
mmm ... Smell the Coffee!http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.comhttp://stores.ebay.com/CoffeeRoastersClub
Get your FREE BLOG now at CaffeBLOG.com!http://www.CaffeBLOG.com

20) From: Paul Carder
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Sean, I have an iRoast 1 that I've had for 3+ yrs. Here's the profile I =
use for EVERYTHING. It's the same that I found in Tom's helps that he =
used when cupping samples. 350 for 3 minutes. 400 for 3 minutes. 450 for =
3 minutes. I roast inside except for warm weather and low wind outside, =
so it's pretty consistent. I always use 140 grams of beans which ends up =
with 1/4 lb roasted beans. The total roast time will vary according to =
bean variety and roast level desired, But I listen and watch carefully =
and hit the cool button when needed. Listening for 1rst and 2nd crack =
can be a hassle with the loud iRoast, but I try. Once I get a specific =
bean's timing of cracks down, I go mainly by sight and hit the cool =
button at the same time in subsequent roasts of the same bean. I =
generally get a city+ with about 1:50 to 1:40 left in the 3rd cycle. A =
FC-FC+ with about 1:30 to 1:10 left, and a light vienna- vienna with 1 =
minute or less left in the 3rd cycle. Remember, some beans roast darker =
than others so it's important to initially listen for the cracks. Each =
machine will have it's own"personality" but once you get familiar with =
it, a piece of cake! I'm well satisfied with my iRoast! Familiy and =
friends who taste my home roast say it's some of the best coffee they've =
ever had. Now if you get that kind of reaction from folks who have never =
had anything but Folgers or donut shop coffee, you can be pleased with =
your efforts. Hope this helps you out a bit.
PAUL CARDER

21) From: Myron J
My iRoast1 always got to FC in about 6 minutes..
I never got around to checking actual temps, but no setting were very 
helpful..
I have modified the iRoast to increase air flow by punching some holes in 
the chaff collecter, removing the screen from the cover, so the chaff can 
fly out...To catch the chaff  i added a net sleeve (closed at the top) to 
the cover, using the vent attachment to make hook the sleeve to the cover.
Now i am getting 8 - 10 minute roasts..
Best,
myron
Myron Joshua
Kibbutz Kfar Etzion
90912
Israel
+972-(0)2-9935 178

22) From: Mejia, Carlos
Myron, would you happen to have any pictures to show how you did this
modification?  Also, what type of net did you use to catch the chaff?
I'm interested in finding ways to increase the time of my roasts and I
think better air flow will really help.
Thanks... ~carlos

23) From: Allon Stern
On Dec 4, 2007, at 12:15 AM, Mejia, Carlos wrote:
<Snip>
In order to vent to the outside, I run my iRoast through a 4"  
aluminum dry vent hose to a window vent adapter; I cut a 4" hole in a  
piece of wood that fits snugly in a window. The airflow from the  
roaster itself was not enough to vent well enough to prevent the  
house from smelling like roasting (not acceptable to the wife), so I  
added a 12V muffin fan to the outside of the vent, to draw the air  
out. I would imagine that this forced air venting may be beneficial  
to a the roasting process; I have considered removing the screen from  
the chaff collector lid; they're $9.95 from Hearthware, so I may  
purchase one to experiment on, keeping the original one unmodified.
The problem with that is that my window screen (still installed)  
would end up being the chaff collector :)  I may have to remove the  
screen from that window.
I wonder how well it would work if I removed the chaff filter mesh as  
well, allowing all of the chaff to be blown outside (or use a  
homebrew external chaff collector). This approach may allow too much  
airflow - as noted in Tom's tip sheets, the chaff actually helps  
control the temperature of the roasting chamber by blocking air.  
Since the amount of chaff varies greatly with different beans,  
greater control could be achieved by using a manual vent adjustment  
instead of letting the chaff do the blocking.
-
allon

24) From: Myron J
I took some photos and will post them on a blog that i was going to start as 
an experiment for myself athttp://aboutcoffee.ning.com/I will send you an invitation to join the group (and anyone else who is 
interested) so you can have a look.
Best is to email me off list for that.
It really isn't a very beautiful or sophisticated thing...but if it 
helps..my pleasure!
Myron Joshua
Kibbutz Kfar Etzion
90912
Israel
+972-(0)2-9935 178

25) From: Ross
Myron,
Sounds like you went with the cave man mods, smart man, you saved a bundle. 
I bought a variac and a temp probe and accomplished basically the same thing 
for a $170 bucks more. 
Ross

26) From: Ross
John,
I know the manual says you can use 2 white scoops (one cup of greens), try 
one and a half white scoops, (3/4 cup of greens) you will get better 
results.  I have just read through most of the posts here on the IRoast, it 
does look like several people have had better luck stretching out the roasts 
to reasonable times by enlarging the holes in the chaff collector, I haven't 
tried that but it sounds like a good idea to do that too.
Ross


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