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Topic: SS popcorn popper (4 msgs / 80 lines)
1) From: Bill Hill
I know that there aren't many low-tech stovetop popper-roasters on the
list, but I know that there's also a ton of experience and expertise.
I bought a SS popper 2 months ago and have been loving it for roasting
1/2 pound and 3/4 pound batches.  A couple of weeks ago, I was
roasting 5 pounds for our elk camp (yes, gourmet coffee in the
boonies!), and kicked it up to 1 pound batches.  The increased
resistance of all that coffee chewed up my gears!!  By the 5th batch,
I dumped in a pound of Idido Misty Valley and couldn't crank (I
presume that I got through the last batch because of decreased density
of the beans as they roasted).  I would up scorching a pound of
awesome beans, had to pitch them!
Anyway, I ordered a couple of new sets of gears and was wondering if
anyone has any suggestions as to how to protect them?  One is to make
sure that the agitators are really really flush (the gears got chewed
when the agitator stopped and my hand didn't!).  But is there a
product that I can buy that will protect the gears and help them to
slip a little easier?
Thanks in advance,
Bill

2) From: Stephen Niezgoda
Bill
I use a little anti-seize lubricant.  The silver stuff you buy at the
auto-part store for lugnuts and spark plugs etc.  It is cheap and stable to
high temps and won't run off the gears.  I've also through drilled the gears
and shaft and pinned the gears on mine.  I don't know how the SS models are
set up but with my cheapy aluminum popper I've stripped the shaft before
during a large roast.
How did the 1 lb batches turn out? I always found I had much more control
and better results with 1/2 lbs in the popper.  I always used the popper
over a white gas stove which burn really hot for good roasting control
though.
On Nov 30, 2007 11:02 AM, Bill Hill  wrote:
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-- 
From now on it is only through a conscious choice and through a deliberate
policy that humanity can survive.
Pope John Paul II

3) From: Angelo
You could go in a different direction all together. There is an item 
called StirChef which is a battery-powered sauce stirrer which fits 
on top of the pot. The motor has quite a bit of torque and the unit 
costs about $15...
Angelo
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4) From: Bill Hill
Angelo and Stephen,
I appreciate the thoughts.  I think I'll keep with the hand-crank
version...I do love the rustic nature of hand-making my coffee roasts.
 And all of the 1-pound versions turned out pretty good (especially
considering that it was for elk camp!), but the first batch definitely
took a bit longer to get to first crack: I didn't have quite enough
heat to it.
Appreciate the suggestions.  Any others, please let me know.
Bill
On 11/30/07, Angelo  wrote:
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