HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Making do, and loving it (well, loving the coffee) (13 msgs / 343 lines)
1) From: Vicki Smith
Our plans for the immediate future recently came to a screeching halt 
because Ron unexpectedly lost his job. That means the gifts were 
returned to the store, plans to visit my son in the US were cancelled, 
and we won't be getting a Behmor anytime soon.
Yesterday, I roasted about a pound of Harar Horse in my bread machine. 
It was -22 C (-7 F) out, and once I preheated the bread pan the roast 
went smoothly. The coffee this AM was excellent, though roasts aren't 
quite as even when I am roasting in very cold weather.
As Ron and I sat around the table this morning, sipping our coffee, we 
recognized how lucky we are to have this warm house, the good coffee, 
and each other. I can live without the Behmor. Heck, I could even live 
without coffee.
We're 55, and suddenly, we have no idea what the future may hold. We do 
know though that what makes life worth living doesn't sit wrapped under 
a Christmas tree or on a kitchen counter roasting coffee.
v

2) From: Eddie Dove
"We do know though that what makes life worth living doesn't sit
wrapped under a Christmas tree or on a kitchen counter roasting
coffee."
That's right Vicki, its great people like you!  My wife and I were
just talking about this today and making sure we taught Wyatt what is
truly important.
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On Nov 30, 2007 7:30 PM, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Kris McN
Amen, sister!  Of course, I have a warm, fuzzy baby head on my chest as I
write this, so it's easy to see what's important (though a cup of good
coffee helps smooth over the rough spots, to be sure).
Kris McN

4) From: Sandra Andina
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I'll add the amen! Today I got a note from a pal with leukemia (who is  
going through some nasty chemo before the bone marrow transplant) that  
the Sumatra I roasted arrived--and the only reason she didn't tear  
into it and grind it is that it's bedtime for her!
It's being able to give of yourself, not of your funds, that makes  
this season so special--doubly so when you get to witness delight.
On Nov 30, 2007, at 7:56 PM, Kris McN wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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I'll add the amen! Today I got =
a note from a pal with leukemia (who is going through some nasty chemo =
before the bone marrow transplant) that the Sumatra I roasted =
arrived--and the only reason she didn't tear into it and grind it is =
that it's bedtime for her!  It's being able to give of =
yourself, not of your funds, that makes this season so special--doubly =
so when you get to witness delight.On Nov 30, 2007, =
at 7:56 PM, Kris McN wrote:
Amen, = sister!  Of course, I have a warm, fuzzy baby head on my chest as I = write this, so it's easy to see what's important (though a cup of good = coffee helps smooth over the rough spots, to be sure). Kris McN = Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-5--857097320--

5) From: RK
snip: from Vicki Smith:
<Snip>
Sorry to hear the news of Ron's job loss. Your additude is great and I'm
sure it will work out for the both of you, and Christmas is in the heart not
under the tree. God does not close one door without opening another.
Enjoy the coffee and the time together.
RK

6) From: Lynne
Vicki -
My prayers are going out that Ron can get another job soon. But it is
uplifting
to read how you both certainly have your priorities straight!
I'm fortunate that my kids (all young adults now) understand my (current,
but
not permanent - I hope!!) situation means there aren't any presents at
Christmas.
What we do have is a wonderful day together - which is certainly more 'gift'
that
I could ever desire. They don't have much money either, so sometimes they
think up something special that doesn't cost anything - or really cheap.
For instance, once, when my oldest came over to visit around my birthday,
she
decided to stop at each place she changed for a different line on the subway
and
bus lines - she bought something very inexpensive (food items, must have
been
around a dollar or so) and even found a cute, very cheap trinket.
That was her gift to me - I'll always remember it, too. (She's also put
together some
really funny cards that I'll keep forever, of course). Another time, on the
birthday of
her oldest brother, she called him up & read birthday cards to him from the
store -
she was too poor to even buy one!
Vicki wrote:
<Snip>
Boy, I'm with you there - right behind you, too !!
(I'm 54 & trying to figure out what to do with my life)
{{{{{{{{{{{{{{big hugs to both of you}}}}}}}}}}}}}
Lynne

7) From: Marty Wooten
Vicki,
 
I am sorry to hear of the challenges you are facing. You have a great outlook of what really is important and I have found that helps to make the rough parts of our journey passable. You and your family are in our thoughts and prayers.
 
Now you have me thinking about what Ethiopian I may want to roast this weekend ;o)
 
Marty
----- Original Message ----
From: Vicki Smith 
To: homeroast
Sent: Friday, November 30, 2007 8:30:40 PM
Subject: +Making do, and loving it (well, loving the coffee)
Our plans for the immediate future recently came to a screeching halt 
because Ron unexpectedly lost his job. That means the gifts were 
returned to the store, plans to visit my son in the US were cancelled, 
and we won't be getting a Behmor anytime soon.
Yesterday, I roasted about a pound of Harar Horse in my bread machine. 
It was -22 C (-7 F) out, and once I preheated the bread pan the roast 
went smoothly. The coffee this AM was excellent, though roasts aren't 
quite as even when I am roasting in very cold weather.
As Ron and I sat around the table this morning, sipping our coffee, we 
recognized how lucky we are to have this warm house, the good coffee, 
and each other. I can live without the Behmor. Heck, I could even live 
without coffee.
We're 55, and suddenly, we have no idea what the future may hold. We do 
know though that what makes life worth living doesn't sit wrapped under 
a Christmas tree or on a kitchen counter roasting coffee.
v

8) From: Vicki Smith
Thanks for all the support, both on and off list. You guys (and gals) 
are the best.
I think all of us who roast our own coffee have to share a basic 
optimism and a willingness to go outside of the box (and colour outside 
of the lines) to even begin to explore the world of homeroast.
It is that same sort of thing that will make looking for new work (at 56 
and during a time of year when no one is hiring) less difficult than it 
might be otherwise.
Fortunately, my job is secure. We can't really live on what I earn 
(not-for-profit social work doesn't pay much), but we won't lose our 
house if we chop our other expenses.
v
RK wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Aaron Scholten
Vicki:
Sorry to hear about your job loss.  I had the same thing happen to me a 
few years ago.  December 23rd I was laid off.  No notice, nothing just, 
sorry, oh and merry christmas.  I said F it, I am not letting it ruin my 
holiday plans with the family.
The end of a job is not the end of the world.  Nothing under the tree, 
or not even having a tree is not the end of the true spirit of what 
christmas was meant to be. 
Christmas is a time to be thankful.  Be thankful you still have a 
family.  Be thankful you still have your health.  Be thankful you are 
still free to enjoy doing pretty much anything you want to do at will.  
Be thankful you are alive.....
A job will find you.  Hell, with my ill disposition I still managed to 
get a good job.  Imagine what someone like you, who is able to be nice 
to people will be able to accomplish  :)  Seriously, the end of the year 
is probably not going to happen job wise for you, but into next year you 
will land one easily.
Think of this as a message from whichever deity you worship that.  you 
done good work.  but you are working too hard, and since you won't take 
the time off yourself, they are making you take time off to relax for a 
little while, spend the time with family and friends, and when the 
vacation time is over, will reward you with a better job.
As for the unemployment office,  please, try not to let them piss you 
off either.  I know *that* is really asking a lot but, don't let em get 
to ya.
All seriousness, things can look gloomy and you force a smile but it all 
works out in the end, generally for the better.  You become a better, 
stronger person because of it.
Aaron

10) From: Robert Gulley
Hi Vicki
So sorry to hear about what happened to your husband. I know that so 
many people are experiencing the same thing, but it always hits 
hardest when it happens to us. Our thoughts and prayers will be with 
you all for finding direction quickly. As for living without coffee, 
I have a feeling that the friends you have made while on this list 
will not let that happen. If you start getting low, send the word out 
and I bet all kinds of greens will be filling your mailbox!
Best wishes -
Robert (RG)
At 08:30 PM 11/30/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
"I have measured out my life with coffee spoons."  ~T.S. Eliot  

11) From: Vicki Smith
I knew there was a a reason I succumbed and let my stash grow so large 
LOL. We should be fine in the coffee department for the next four months 
or so. i know the list would help though, if it came to that!!
v
Robert Gulley wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Sandra Andina
At my first law firm job, I was laid off AT THE CHRISTMAS PARTY, with  
no bonus, not even a box of candy (I had been hired as a probate  
paralegal and then passed the bar exam, and they could neither afford  
another associate nor keep an attorney on in a lay position--catch-22.  
You'd think they'd at least have given me the da*n Frango mints).  Bob  
was still in medical school, having just gotten his Ph.D. I hadn't  
worked long enough for unemployment compensation, and we were living  
on $3600 a year from his folks that replaced the research assistant  
stipend that ended when he got the Ph.D.  Somehow, we survived (kid- 
sized Menorah from the temple gift shop that used birthday candles,  
three-foot tabletop fake tree decorated with popcorn, cranberries, and  
decoupaged L'Eggs pantyhose containers; he gave me guitar strings, I  
gave him pipe tobacco and blackberry jam I'd made from the bushes in  
the parking lot).
Tis the season to reminisce (and stay indoors and watch the sleet  
storm),
Sandy
On Dec 1, 2007, at 8:50 AM, Aaron Scholten wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Loyd Blankenship
V -
Sorry to hear about the job. I've gotten dot-bombed a couple of times over
the last 20 years, and while it's never easy, there has *never* been a time
when I didn't look back a year later and say "Wow, I'm glad that happened."
Hang in there!
loyd
-- 
Make a small loan, Make a big difference - Kiva.org


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