HomeRoast Digest


Topic: China Coffee: Good? or "Good"(ish...) (5 msgs / 100 lines)
1) From: Bryan Wray
Just recently read an article online (email me off-list for the link if interested) about coffee from China.  I had not ever heard of coffee from China before, and the article seems to mention Nestle a lot, which makes me wonder if it is actually good coffee or if it is "good" coffee (for example, to a lot of people out there, Starbucks is great coffee... *puke*).
I was just wondering if anyone has ever had or heard of decent coffee (Tom standards :0) ) coming out of China or if it is more low-mid grade stuff.  It doesn't seem to me that there would be enough altitude around there to grow anything all that great... but what do I know? (the answer is pretty much nothing, btw).
-Bry
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
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2) From: Jim Carter
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I don't know the answer to your question, Bryan. But, here is my take on 
coffee from China. Sweet Maria's offers some 70+ different beans from 
all of the coffee-producing regions around the world. Tom actually goes 
to many  of these places to meet the growers, check out their crops and 
facilities, and cup the coffee first hand.  His recently concluded trip 
to Yemen is a good example of his diligence in the pursuit of good 
coffee.  Apparently, not many coffee importers/purveyors have bothered 
to visit Yemen.  If China produced coffee worth mentioning, Tom would, 
well, mention it.  If it scored high enough to meet his standards and he 
could get it from China to Oakland, CA without degradation of quality, 
he would offer it.
Just my couple of copper pieces,
-- Jim Carter
p.s.  I hope this doesn't come across as harsh. I'm not trying to be 
antagonistic.
p.p.s.  I noticed the change in your signature line. I do hope to check 
out your shop the next time I'm in Kalamazoo.
Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Randall Nortman
On Mon, Dec 03, 2007 at 10:01:54AM -0800, Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>
China is pretty big, and includes a wide variety of terrains, from
deserts to high mountains.  Altitude itself would not be a problem.
I'm not sure they have the combination of high altitude in tropical
latitudes to provide the right conditions for growing really good
arabica.  Robusta can be grown well enough in lowlands, as far as I
understand it.
A google search turned this up:http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee.asia.myanmar.htmlRead the last paragraph, all the way at the bottom.  The arabica is
low-grown and not high quality, according to our kind host.  (That
page might be old, of course.)
-- 
Randall

4) From: Bryan Wray
The link to the bottom paragraph was exactly the type of answer I was looking for; and the answer was exactly what I figured it would be.
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
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5) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
It still applies; I have never cupped a good Yunan coffee. It's 
extremely flat tasting, low-grown, commercial grade stuff. -Tom
<Snip>
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com


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