HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Sound Box for the iR2 (was: I'm giving up) (48 lines)
1) From: Mejia, Carlos
I know that there has been consistency problems reported with the iR2
and you machine may be different than mine.  But I've roasted over 100
roasts in the last year and have very good results all but a few early
attempts.  I think I used the preset profiles maybe one or two times and
found them to be way too hot!  Then I began to investigate other's
profiles including Tom's but after some experimentation I've arrived at
a profile that works well for me.  Your mileage may vary as Robert
mentioned, there are a lot of variables that can impact your results.  
I too was very frustrated with not being able to hear the cracks.
Realizing all of the noise was coming from the iR2 base, I set out to
build a box so I could insulate it and hopefully quite it enough to hear
the coffee. I don't have any pictures but will try to describe what I
did for anyone who wants to try this.
I cut a 6" piece of 8" dia cardboard tube (the type that's used for
concrete forms) This can be found at any big box hardware store like
Home Depot. I had some left over from a homemade telescope project (one
of my other hobbies). I then cut a piece of 1/4" plywood slightly over
8" dia to fit on the bottom of the tube and glued it in place.  I put
the base of the iR2 inside this "box" and pushed it to one side so the
display and controls could easily be accessed through a small window
that I cut out of the cardboard. Then I filled the inside of the box
around the back of the iR2 with foam.  I cut another round of plywood
that would fit on the top of the tube.  Then with the iR2 inside the box
I set it upside down on this piece of wood and traced around the top of
the iR2 (top of the iR2 base that is). I then cut out an opening so it
fits on top around the base of the iR2 to close the space where the foam
is. I realized that this was blocking the air from entering into the iR2
from the base (small hole seen on bottom) so I drilled some large holes
in the wooden base corresponding to where these small vents are on the
iR2. Finally, three small blocks were glued to the wooden base to lift
it off the surface where it sits so that air could draw through the
holes I drilled and into the machine.
The objective of all this was to try to mute the sound of the iRoar so
that I could hear the cracks.  The results... It really made a
difference in the decibels and I can now hear the cracks!  The only
downside is a slight increase in the temps, probably because some of the
heat can't escape from around the insulated base.  This has had very
minor effect on my roasts, now finishing around 9 to 9 1/2 minutes for
FC+, about 30 seconds sooner than it was before the box was made.


HomeRoast Digest