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Topic: Behmor Profiles was Re: +RE: OUT OF STOCK ON AIDA'S RESERVE (7 msgs / 218 lines)
1) From: Jeff Anderson
A few questions for new Behmor owners and others...
1) What's an SHG type bean?
2) I may be missing the obvious here, but that's not unusual for me. How 
do I tell the difference between a hard bean and soft bean?
3)  Are you finding that the profiles the Behmor manual recommends for 
different types of beans to be generally accurate (i.e. P1 and P2 for 
hard beans, P5 for Island coffees, etc.)?
Thanks...
Jeff
Scott Miller wrote:
<Snip>

2) From: Scott Miller
Jeff,
SHG stands for Strictly High Grown, I think, and SHB is Strictly Hard Bean.
In different countries (mainly Central America, I think) those designations
are used indicate the beans are grown above a certain altitude. High
altitude generally means a more dense bean and often means better quality.
When you look at the descriptive notes for beans on the SM site, there is a
section for "Grade" and that's where you will see the various designations
for that offering. Different countries have different ways of grading beans
for quality or also for purposes of export taxes (Ethiopia does that, I
believe).
So that's why the P2 profile versus the ones for Brazils and lower grown
beans is different... the hardness of the bean works better with the
different profile. The lower grown beans, for me, do better with a more
gentle ramping of the heat. I'm going to roast some different Brazilian
beans this weekend and see how those work.
cheers,
Scott
On Dec 5, 2007 12:04 PM, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Julie Tieszen
Where do peaberries fit in with all that? Should they be roasted on P1 or P2, or use the slowing ramping profiles? I have yet to roast a peaberry that I like so I think I'm doing something wrong.
Julie
----- Original Message ----
From: Scott Miller 
To: homeroast
Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 12:33:10 PM
Subject: Re: Behmor Profiles was Re: +RE: OUT OF STOCK ON AIDA'S RESERVE
Jeff,
SHG stands for Strictly High Grown, I think, and SHB is Strictly Hard Bean. In different countries (mainly Central America, I think) those designations are used indicate the beans are grown above a certain altitude. High altitude generally means a more dense bean and often means better quality. When you look at the descriptive notes for beans on the SM site, there is a section for "Grade" and that's where you will see the various designations for that offering. Different countries have different ways of grading beans for quality or also for purposes of export taxes (Ethiopia does that, I believe).
So that's why the P2 profile versus the ones for Brazils and lower grown beans is different... the hardness of the bean works better with the different profile. The lower grown beans, for me, do better with a more gentle ramping of the heat. I'm going to roast some different Brazilian beans this weekend and see how those work.
cheers,
Scott
On Dec 5, 2007 12:04 PM, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
A few questions for new Behmor owners and others...
1) What's an SHG type bean?
2) I may be missing the obvious here, but that's not unusual for me. How
do I tell the difference between a hard bean and soft bean?
3)  Are you finding that the profiles the Behmor manual recommends for
different types of beans to be generally accurate (i.e. P1 and P2 for
hard beans, P5 for Island coffees, etc.)?
Thanks...
Jeff
Scott Miller wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>

4) From: Justin Marquez
Since peaberries are smaller than the regular "half-bean", they generally
roast a bit faster than longbeans. IIRC, peaberries may sometimes be graded
as a "partial defect"  when included in a sample of mainly longbeans  - they
roast faster and are therefore considered a problem.
I think some folks consider an all-peaberry roast to yield a more intense
flavor than reguar longbeans. I have never tested that concept personally. I
think the only way you could do it fairly would be to cull enough peaberries
from a batch of some "regular coffee" so that you could roast the same
origin and batch as both peaberry and longbean. You'd have to be careful to
hit the same degree of roast, too.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On Dec 5, 2007 11:54 AM, Julie Tieszen  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Scott Miller
I have only done 1 peaberry roast in the Behmor and went a bit darker than I
wanted to. Since I don't roast a lot of peaberries, that's no shocker to me
as they can be tricky in my experience ... if I'm not paying close
attention, I can miss 1st crack.
I would guess the same guidelines apply using profiles based on whether the
bean is high grown or low grown, but I don't have enough experience with
peaberries in general, and peaberries in the Behmor, specifically, to offer
any advice from my own experience.
Isn't there a different drum that's either available, or soon to be
available with a smaller screen size for use with peaberries and smaller
beans?
cheers,
Scott
On Dec 5, 2007 12:54 PM, Julie Tieszen  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Robert Yoder
Hi Scott,
 
I asked Joe Behm about this and he suggested a short trial run on "Cool" to=
 cull any beans which escape the drum.  The new drum with smaller grid shou=
ld be available pretty soon.
 
I am a bit nervous about roasting a 90G batch of Aida's Reserve Peaberry.  =
It was suggested that I use 1/4 P3 C, watching closely, and be ready to ope=
n the door within 30 sec of Cool to hasten cool-down.  
 
Wish me luck!
 
Thanks for all your information!
 
robert yoder
 
 
From: peechdogg: homeroast: Re: Be=
hmor Profiles was Re: +RE: OUT OF STOCK ON AIDA'S RESERVEDate: Wed, 5 Dec 2=
007 13:28:27 -0500I have only done 1 peaberry roast in the Behmor and went =
a bit darker than I wanted to. Since I don't roast a lot of peaberries, tha=
t's no shocker to me as they can be tricky in my experience ... if I'm not =
paying close attention, I can miss 1st crack. I would guess the same guidel=
ines apply using profiles based on whether the bean is high grown or low gr=
own, but I don't have enough experience with peaberries in general, and pea=
berries in the Behmor, specifically, to offer any advice from my own experi=
ence. Isn't there a different drum that's either available, or soon to be a=
vailable with a smaller screen size for use with peaberries and smaller bea=
ns?cheers,Scott
On Dec 5, 2007 12:54 PM, Julie Tieszen  wrote:
Where do peaberries fit in with all that? Should they be roasted on P1 or P=
2, or use the slowing ramping profiles? I have yet to roast a peaberry that=
 I like so I think I'm doing something wrong. Julie
----- Original Message ----From: Scott Miller To: hom=
eroast: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 12:33:10 PMSu=
bject: Re: Behmor Profiles was Re: +RE: OUT OF STOCK ON AIDA'S RESERVE Jeff=
,SHG stands for Strictly High Grown, I think, and SHB is Strictly Hard Bean=
. In different countries (mainly Central America, I think) those designatio=
ns are used indicate the beans are grown above a certain altitude. High alt=
itude generally means a more dense bean and often means better quality. Whe=
n you look at the descriptive notes for beans on the SM site, there is a se=
ction for "Grade" and that's where you will see the various designations fo=
r that offering. Different countries have different ways of grading beans f=
or quality or also for purposes of export taxes (Ethiopia does that, I beli=
eve). So that's why the P2 profile versus the ones for Brazils and lower gr=
own beans is different... the hardness of the bean works better with the di=
fferent profile. The lower grown beans, for me, do better with a more gentl=
e ramping of the heat. I'm going to roast some different Brazilian beans th=
is weekend and see how those work. cheers,Scott
On Dec 5, 2007 12:04 PM, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
A few questions for new Behmor owners and others...1) What's an SHG type be=
an?2) I may be missing the obvious here, but that's not unusual for me. How=
do I tell the difference between a hard bean and soft bean? 3)  Are you fin=
ding that the profiles the Behmor manual recommends fordifferent types of b=
eans to be generally accurate (i.e. P1 and P2 forhard beans, P5 for Island =
coffees, etc.)?Thanks...Jeff Scott Miller wrote:> Agreed on the P2 setting;=
 it seems to work best with high grown or SHG> type beans. I think I have d=
one at least a half dozen roasts with that> profile. Most recently I did 14=
 oz. of Costa Rican Dota coop using P2 > with the 1# setting. This gave a n=
ice FC+ roast that was excellent.>> I have not done any low grown beans, Br=
azils or Kona come to mind,> yet. I seem to recall on of the profiles is su=
ggested for low altitude > beans, but I'm not near my copy of the manual at=
 the moment.>> cheers,>> Scott>>=Put your friends on the big screen with Windows Vista® + Windows Live™.http://www.microsoft.com/windows/shop/specialoffers.mspx?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_C=PC_MediaCtr_bigscreen_102007=

7) From: Scott Miller
That's a really good idea for culling out beans that are too small.
Entirely too much common sense and simplicity for my silly mind; however, I
have checked and we have consensus: both active brain cells agree this is a
workable idea.
I've done 1 roast on P3 and think I will drop the weight slightly also,
unless I'm looking for a very light roast. I'll check my notes, but I recall
it giving a City roast that was a bit lighter than I was looking for when I
used it.
cheers,
Scott
On Dec 5, 2007 2:44 PM, Robert Yoder  wrote:
<Snip>


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