HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Let me know if I'm bugging you... (14 msgs / 253 lines)
1) From: Jeff Anderson
I don't know why these questions are popping into my mind the last few 
days. If you need a break let me know.
Anyway, what do you do with the odds and ends I'm sure we all end up 
with...3 oz here, 2oz. there, etc.? I have accumulated several now, and 
I need to start culling them. I may know enough now to make somewhat of 
an educated guess, like don't mix two light, fruity Central Americans. 
And I always need beans to clean my grinder with, so if I mess up a 
little batch it won't be a total waste. I was just wondering if you had 
any other suggestions about how to intelligently deal with the odds and 
ends.
Also, it has occurred to me that the only way I can relate to the word 
"profile" is in terms of time only...how long between cracks, do I want 
City+ or Full City, etc. I am clueless as to why someone would want to 
"stretch out first crack", etc., etc. I"m not ready to go there yet, but 
I'm curious. Can you give me a little idea of where I"m going once I get 
the basics down? I'm not ready to start working with other parameters 
yet, but I am curious.
Thanks...
Jeff

2) From: Floyd Lozano
Mystery blend!  They usually taste (unexpectedly) great and I can never
reproduce them.  I have a 4lb 'Nine bean' blend (i roast in 1/2 lb
increments, and some of this was nearing a year old coffee) that I threw
together and friends loved it.  And if they don't, you can always grind it
up and put it in the office coffee pot.  Guaranteed it will taste
outstanding, relatively speaking!
Stretching the time out between 1st and 2nd crack is about 2 things really -
one, the flavor tends to be better in your coffee - usually more sweetness
comes though, I find.  But I think it's really more about achieving a
controlled roast - if you are blowing into 2nd crack within seconds of 1st
ending, you've lost control of the process and are at the whim of fate and
fortune at that point.  Slow down and smell the beans!
-F
On Dec 6, 2007 1:36 PM, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
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3) From: Allon Stern
On Dec 6, 2007, at 1:36 PM, Jeff Anderson wrote:
<Snip>
Hah! I was gonna ask the same question.
And what do you mean "beans to clean my grinder with" ?  Isn't the  
idea that the beans get ground up and need to be cleaned? Or do you  
use them to clean out the rice or grindz residue, if you use those to  
clean the grinder?
-
allon

4) From: Dave
On Dec 6, 2007 10:36 AM, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>
I put all those little bits in a bag and call it Dave's AMU for all *A*ll *M
*ixed *U*p. Darn good coffee. sometimes unexpectedly great. But never
duplicable.
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps

5) From: Jim Gundlach
Jeff,
I just mix them up, roast,  and think of it as an effort to replicate  
Tom's Monkey Blend. On stretching the time between first and second  
crack, the idea is that there are a lot of wonderful reactions taking  
place at that temperature and if you stretch it you get more of the  
things that make these coffees great.
      pecan jim
On Dec 6, 2007, at 12:36 PM, Jeff Anderson wrote:
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6) From: raymanowen
"I always need beans to clean my grinder..." The Hell, you say!
2 and 3 oz coffee bag tailings sounds reasonable to me. It becomes an
opportunity if you buy coffee in 1 and 2 pound baggies, and roast that
quantity in a week or less. This tailings stash will last quite well in the
original plastic bags in a cool, dark place.
How did you come to decide not to mix light, fruity central Americans?
If A is good and B is good, where's the logic that A+B will be ungood?
Any time you get coffee, the beans are unlikely to have all come from the
same shrub. It's already a mix, from the same origin!
When we roast coffee, we already tacitly accept the slight differences from
bean to bean in the same lot, otherwise we'd tether the roaster to prevent
the Crack from blowing it plumb off the table. Nice that they don't all
crack simultuously- 1000 bean Pickup!
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Say again, How you clean your grinder?
On Dec 6, 2007 11:36 AM, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
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7) From: Jeff Anderson
Sorry, this was supposed to be to someone off list, but if anyone wants 
to chime in, have at it...
Jeff Anderson wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Jeff Anderson
Bingo. I use them to clean out the Grindz residue.
Allon Stern wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Jeff Anderson
In a word, ignorance. I was trying to figure out something logical, but 
"mystery blend" sounds good, and a lot more fun than trying to do 
something logical. ;-). Thanks everyone for contributing to my 
education. How do I clean my grinder? I run Grindz through it, then some 
coffee to wash the Grindz residue out, and occasionally clean the burrs 
with a brush, but I'm open to suggestions. It seems like I heard Minute 
Rice will do the same thing as Grindz. Is that true?
"How did you come to decide not to mix light, fruity central Americans?
If A is good and B is good, where's the logic that A+B will be ungood?"
"I always need beans to clean my grinder..." The Hell, you say!
2 and 3 oz coffee bag tailings sounds reasonable to me. It becomes an 
opportunity if you buy coffee in 1 and 2 pound baggies, and roast that 
quantity in a week or less. This tailings stash will last quite well in 
the original plastic bags in a cool, dark place.
How did you come to decide not to mix light, fruity central Americans?
If A is good and B is good, where's the logic that A+B will be ungood?
Any time you get coffee, the beans are unlikely to have all come from 
the same shrub. It's already a mix, from the same origin!
When we roast coffee, we already tacitly accept the slight differences 
from bean to bean in the same lot, otherwise we'd tether the roaster to 
prevent the Crack from blowing it plumb off the table. Nice that they 
don't all crack simultuously- 1000 bean Pickup!
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Say again, How you clean your grinder?

10) From: Cameron Forde
Jeff,
On the question of stretching out the time between first and second,
it is my understanding that some people do this to mute unpleasant
acidity.  Specifically, there is a component of green bean called
chlorogenic acid that decomposes at temperatures between first and
second crack.  This acid causes upset stomachs in some people and thus
the desire to eliminate it.  Stretching the roast presumably allows
more time for this decomposition and decreases the amount of this acid
in the roasted bean.
Cameron
On Dec 6, 2007 12:38 PM, Jeff Anderson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
ceforde

11) From: Homeroaster
Toss them all together for some unexpected surprises.  No rules.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

12) From: Tim Harvey
Ken Davids has a nice chapter in his home roast book about what beans go well with others.
Tim
---- Jeff Anderson  wrote: 
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13) From: Tim Harvey
P2 on the Behmor right? (In re the upset stomach acid destruction between 1 & 2nd)
---- Cameron Forde  wrote: 
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14) From: gin
Hi Jeff:
I just roast the small bags or mix um up and roast them
surprise coffee!!!
ginny
---- Jeff Anderson  wrote: 
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