HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Watt roasting (5 msgs / 271 lines)
1) From: peterz
Gosh I hate to sound like sour grapes, but the reason I have not been 
posting much is because everything I have written for the last few 
months sounds (to me) like I am very unhappy with the world and everyone 
in it. Well, that is not the case, so I will try writing this.
It has always been amazing to me to read all the wonderful reviews of 
roasts done by home roasters. Many of you know I have been roasting with 
home made machines for a few years now; since before the IR2 came out 
and I had been waiting for months for it.
So far I have been using electricity only, and for better than a year 
now I have been using a bread machine/ turbo oven combination which has 
been highly modified.
Never have I tasted blueberry, or had any recognition of any other taste 
that home roasters enjoy. The coffee I roast is just great! Merely 
wonderful!
It was said that it is not a good idea to recirculate the smoke through 
the beans as they roast, so I have been working toward eliminating the 
smoke. Just leaving the TO  tipped so it does not seal seems to let out 
a lot of smoke and chaff, but this has not helped the taste either. I 
even built a bean cooler so The beans could run under cool air for a 
long time to be sure the roast had stopped. Nada! So I figured my 
profiling skills were lacking. Remember, I am trying to get beyond my 
great coffee to another level where coffee tastes like blueberry, and 
marmalade, and strawberries.. etc.
Now to Watt roasting.
I let my roaster run for a while empty to learn what wattage would 
generate 470F.
This turns out to be about 850 Watts. I have a Kill a watt meter plugged 
into a 25 amp Variac, with the heater of the roaster plugged into it.
I tried roasting at this wattage, but the beans (about 500 Gr) took too 
long to get to first crack, and after about 12 minutes I had to boost it 
to even finish the roast.
They tasted baked! The roast ran for less than 15 minutes all told.
So next time I roasted 400 Gr and started at 1450 watts until it reached 
350, then cut back to about 900W.
Even though the rate of increase in temp slowed down, I was still into 
2nd crack in about 11 minutes total.
The coffee is better, but not that great. Looks like I need to work on 
profile more.
Is any one else roasting by measuring Watts?
It seems like a good way to profile, but I may be off on another tangent.
Thanks for listening,
PeterZ
<Snip>

2) From: Jim Gundlach
Peter,
      If you are setting your standard with an empty roaster, you are  
under estimating the amount of heat required to take the beans to the  
desired temperature.  In other words it will take more watts to take a  
full roaster to 470 than it will an empty roaster.   I'd keep the full  
watts up until it reached first crack.
      pecan jim
On Dec 10, 2007, at 8:45 PM, peterz wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
--Apple-Mail-39--7387028
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Peter,
I know I was amazed and surprised when I was actually able to detect  
blueberry tones. It has only happened for me when I roasted some of  
the Idido Misty Valley (IMV) from Fall of 2006. Although I obtained  
some IMV which Tom obtained in Jan 07 I could NOT detect any  
blueberry notes from it. I recently roasted some Ethiopia Harar Horse  
Lot 14659 and did not detect any blueberry immediately after the  
roast but could almost imagine it. I am hoping to actually detect  
some blueberry after resting for 3 days.  I suspect others can detect  
things that I cannot. It happens to me about lots of things in life.  
But that does not mean my life and my coffee aren't excellent, they are.
I understand the new batch of IMV gives strawberry notes. I will soon  
be trying to detect that.
I do believe the Behmor is giving improving my ability to control and  
duplicate roasts. I am hopeful
dave
On Dec 10, 2007, at 6:45 PM, peterz wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-39--7387028
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Peter,I know I was amazed and surprised when I was =
actually able to detect blueberry tones. It has only happened for me =
when I roasted some of the Idido Misty Valley (IMV) from Fall of 2006. =
Although I obtained some IMV which Tom obtained in Jan 07 I could NOT =
detect any blueberry notes from it. I recently roasted some Ethiopia Harar =
Horse Lot 14659 and did not detect any blueberry immediately after the =
roast but could almost imagine it. I am hoping to actually detect some =
blueberry after resting for 3 days.  =
I suspect others can detect things that I cannot. It happens to me about =
lots of things in life. But that does not mean my life and my coffee =
aren't excellent, they are.
I understand the new batch = of IMV gives strawberry notes. I will soon be trying to detect = that.
I do = believe the Behmor is giving improving my ability to control and = duplicate roasts. I am hopeful
dave = On Dec 10, 2007, at 6:45 PM, peterz wrote:
Gosh I = hate to sound like sour grapes, but the reason I have not been posting = much is because everything I have written for the last few months sounds = (to me) like I am very unhappy with the world and everyone in it. Well, = that is not the case, so I will try writing this.It has always been amazing to me to read all the = wonderful reviews of roasts done by home roasters. Many of you know I = have been roasting with home made machines for a few years now; since = before the IR2 came out and I had been waiting for months for = it.So far I have been using = electricity only, and for better than a year now I have been using a = bread machine/ turbo oven combination which has been highly = modified.Never have I tasted blueberry, = or had any recognition of any other taste that home roasters enjoy. The = coffee I roast is just great! Merely wonderful!It was said that it is not a good idea to = recirculate the smoke through the beans as they roast, so I have been = working toward eliminating the smoke. Just leaving the TO  tipped so it does not seal = seems to let out a lot of smoke and chaff, but this has not helped the = taste either. I even built a bean cooler so The beans could run under = cool air for a long time to be sure the roast had stopped. Nada! So I = figured my profiling skills were lacking. Remember, I am trying to get = beyond my great coffee to another level where coffee tastes like = blueberry, and marmalade, and strawberries.. etc. Now to = Watt roasting.I let my roaster run for a while = empty to learn what wattage would generate 470F.This turns out to be about 850 Watts. I have a Kill = a watt meter plugged into a 25 amp Variac, with the heater of the = roaster plugged into it.I tried = roasting at this wattage, but the beans (about 500 Gr) took too long to = get to first crack, and after about 12 minutes I had to boost it to even = finish the roast.They tasted baked! The roast ran = for less than 15 minutes all told.So next time = I roasted 400 Gr and started at 1450 watts until it reached 350, then = cut back to about 900W.Even though = the rate of increase in temp slowed down, I was still into 2nd crack in = about 11 minutes total.The coffee is = better, but not that great. Looks like I need to work on profile = more.Is any one else roasting by = measuring Watts?It seems like a good way to = profile, but I may be off on another tangent. Thanks = for listening, PeterZ homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = = --Apple-Mail-39--7387028--

4) From: Edward Bourgeois
Peter I use a similar setup nowhttp://coffee-roasting.blogspot.com/and my older setup was very similar to yours(BM/CO. I roasted a fine
kenyan with my BM/CO a while back with a cupping auction judge who
thought the roast was excellent. I use a kill a watt/ variac too but
use the voltage reading to monitor and log. I only have about 50
roasts on my newest roaster and am just starting to get it dialed in.
I roasted some Misty a month ago with plenty of blueberry.  I have
wondered about limited air flow but am not sure it's much of a
problem. I generally roast a quart(1 1/2lb) at a time.
On Dec 10, 2007 10:19 PM, Dave Ehrenkranz  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
I use a nonperforated drum with a one inch hole in the end for thermocouple
access. Whatever smoke is generated during first crack does get mixed into
the beans but I cannot taste any adverse effects. Second crack smoke may be
different but I nearly always stop before second.
<Snip>
12 minutes to first is not out of line, but the times spent in the heatup
and development phases may be.
<Snip>
If the heat input is faster than mixing can distribute it evenly through the
beans then you may get scorching. I am not sure if scorching gives the baked
taste you mention, but these profile times should not be baking the beans.
One clue to baked beans is a lower than normal expansion.
I also use the Kill-A-Watt meter. My most common profile is a simple two
stage, full power to a predetermined bean temperature then reduced heat to
the finish. Normal time from startup to first crack is 9 to 11 minutes, and
first crack to finish at city level is 1.5 to 3 minutes.
You must set the heat reduction temperature so that all the first crack pops
are done well before second begins. For the final heat setting, experiment
until you get the ramp at the finish temperature between 5 and 15F per
minute. Just to give you an idea, my initial heat is 1100w, switching at 355
to 375F, final heat 550w. More recently I have been wanting a brighter cup
so the switching temperature was raised to 390 to 400F keeping both heat
settings the same. This gives a strong, rapid first crack. But the last pops
of first are now much closer to the start of second and roast level is city+
to make sure first crack is done.
--


HomeRoast Digest