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Topic: New to roasting--please forgive the obvious questions (4 msgs / 125 lines)
1) From: David Rossell
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi everyone,
 
I just received a Behmor roaster as a holiday gift (best present ever!) =
and
have begun roasting coffee.  Things are going great with most beans, but
decafs and peaberries are giving me trouble.  I've been roasting in
half-pound batches with the P1 profile, just because I'm trying to mess =
with
only one variable right now as I'm learning-time.
 
The decafs are looking like French roast while still in their first =
crack
(They generated a fair bit of smoke as well.).  What's important in
determining the state of a coffee's roast-is it color or the position at
which you stop the roast relative to the first and second cracks?
 
The peaberries I've roasted seem to have a very long, drawn-out first =
crack
such that the first crack seems almost to blend into the second.  Am I a
little crazy?  
 
Apologies if these questions are covered in the archives.  If they are,
please let me know roughly where and I'll dig around for them.
 
Thanks,
 
David Rossell
drossell
Administrator of Network Services and Planning
Norwood School
8821 River Rd.
Bethesda, MD 20817
(301) 841-2178
 

2) From: Bryan Wray
French roast in first crack isn't possible... perhaps you missed first crack and you are actually in second crack?  Also, there should be no smoke at first crack.  I have had the same situations as you when working with (some) peaberries, so you are not alone on this one.  Not just peaberries, too.  I have had a lot of beans that seem to have 1st and second run almost into each other.  I am finding that to help this I need to be running a slower/gentler/whatever profile (P3,P4,P5) and use a higher batch rating (i.e. if roasting 1/4, set it on 1/2) to ensure that you will be able to get enough time and the machine won't max out.  This doesn't always work, and I usually roast for SO espresso anyway, so this approach is preferred anyway, but I do find it helps 1st crack to have less outliers.  But when doing this you will have to manually cool the roast so you really have to be paying attention.  Also, I would not try this until you are sure that you are correctly hearing both
 cracks.
HTH
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
---------------------------------
Never miss a thing.   Make Yahoo your homepage.

3) From: Jason Greenberg
Our Gracious Host has a nice description of how decaf's different athttp://sweetmarias.com/coffee.others.decafs.htmlBasically, they start darker, so roast by sound and smell (hard to use touch
and taste at 420 degrees). They can reach 1st and 2nd crack at lower
temperatures, transition between 1 and 2 quicker, and develop surface oil
with lighter degrees of roast than untreated beans.
As for your last question, I don't know if you are or not, but a little
crazy is usually a good thing.

4) From: raymanowen
"first crack seems almost to blend into the second.  Am I a little crazy? "
Nope. The beans don't all crack at the same time, or it would be *BANG!,
BANG!, *DONE!
If you're adding heat too rapidly during First Crack, the first ones to
Crack will already be at Second Crack before 1st is all done, so they'll
just blend together.
The "bean mass thermocouple" and the cracks will just sit there and lie to
your face.
I think one thing to be explored is the heat transfer of roasted coffee
compared to green coffee. Coffee beans roast at the surface first, unless
you subscribe to Magic Physics. I think that roasted layer retards the heat
transfer to the bean's interior.
If you have the blast furnace turned up, you are forming insulating roasted
layers before the center receives adequate thermal energy. You can neither
see nor smell the center, so most of the bean is not as far advanced as the
surface.
Has someone found a way to see, smell or measure beyond the surface? If so,
patent it! You have a Tiger by the tail.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On Dec 19, 2007 10:26 AM, David Rossell  wrote:
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-- 
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"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976


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