HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Behmor P4 Profile (40 msgs / 1179 lines)
1) From: Bob Hazen
Since I started using my Behmor, I have struggled with momentum.  I found 
with my IR1, that getting a few seconds into 2nd was my preference.  As 
others have said, with a hot air roaster, it's easy to stop the roast 
quickly.  Not so with a drum roasting.  Hit cool and it keeps on ticking!  I 
also learned that with the IR1, extending the 1st lower temp stage from 3min 
to 5min brought out body in the coffee and was more to my taste.  So why not 
try to slow things down with the Behmor?  Up to now, I've been using the P1 
and P2 profiles and struggling to get just into 2nd, but not too far.  It's 
difficult to know when to hit cool and coast up into 2nd.  I've discounted 
using the slow profiles until yesterday when it occurred to me (thanks to 
some other posts) that maybe I was hitting 1st too fast and hot.  So I tried 
P4.  I roasted half a pound of horse on P4-D with no added time.  1st 
happened at 12'15" and ended at 13'45" then I let it go for almost another 
minute hitting cool when I first heard 2nd.  Initially, I thought I'd gone 
too far and 2nd was going to increase to a roll as with other profiles. 
Instead it just continued very gently for another minute.  Still thinking 
I'd gone too far, albeit gently, I was delighted with the coffee after a 
day's rest.
So in short, I'd say don't discount the slower profiles.  I'll be roasting 
the same coffee/profile again and attempt to anticipate 2nd by 30 seconds or 
so to see how that plays out.
YMMV....
Bob

2) From: Les
Thanks for sharing.  I have not tried P4 yet, maybe tonight.
Les
On Dec 22, 2007 3:30 PM, Bob Hazen  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Aaron Scholten
I like the P4 for kona's  or AME, it works very well for them.
Aaron

4) From: Sandra Andina
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Found myself with 560 gm. of Kona Kowali left to roast for 2 friends  
tonight as part of their Christmas gifts.  So I divided it into 2  
batches of 280 gm. ea. (a bit more than 1/2 lb.) and left it at P1 but  
hit "1 lb." and chose program B--20 min. total. Finished first crack  
(a good, long aggressive first crack) with about 6 min to go, which  
would have been City--heard the first gentle "szzt" of second about a  
minute later and immediately hit "cool" with the door open a tad. Both  
batches turned out a perfect City+ and the bean munch confirmed a  
lively acidic snappiness rather than sourness.
Sandy
On Dec 22, 2007, at 5:30 PM, Bob Hazen wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Found myself with 560 gm. of =
Kona Kowali left to roast for 2 friends tonight as part of their =
Christmas gifts.  So I divided it into 2 batches of 280 gm. ea. (a =
bit more than 1/2 lb.) and left it at P1 but hit "1 lb." and chose =
program B--20 min. total. Finished first crack (a good, long aggressive =
first crack) with about 6 min to go, which would have been City--heard =
the first gentle "szzt" of second about a minute later and immediately =
hit "cool" with the door open a tad. Both batches turned out a perfect =
City+ and the bean munch confirmed a lively acidic snappiness rather =
than sourness.Sandy
On Dec 22, 2007, at 5:30 PM, Bob =
Hazen wrote:
Since I started using my Behmor, I have struggled with = momentum.  I found with my IR1, that getting a few seconds into 2nd = was my preference.  As others have said, with a hot air roaster, = it's easy to stop the roast quickly.  Not so with a drum roasting. =  Hit cool and it keeps on ticking!  I also learned that with = the IR1, extending the 1st lower temp stage from 3min to 5min brought = out body in the coffee and was more to my taste.  So why not try to = slow things down with the Behmor?  Up to now, I've been using the = P1 and P2 profiles and struggling to get just into 2nd, but not too far. =  It's difficult to know when to hit cool and coast up into 2nd. =  I've discounted using the slow profiles until yesterday when it = occurred to me (thanks to some other posts) that maybe I was hitting 1st = too fast and hot.  So I tried P4.  I roasted half a pound of = horse on P4-D with no added time.  1st happened at 12'15" and ended = at 13'45" then I let it go for almost another minute hitting cool when I = first heard 2nd.  Initially, I thought I'd gone too far and 2nd was = going to increase to a roll as with other profiles. Instead it just = continued very gently for another minute.  Still thinking I'd gone = too far, albeit gently, I was delighted with the coffee after a day's = rest. So in short, I'd say don't discount the slower profiles. =  I'll be roasting the same coffee/profile again and attempt to = anticipate 2nd by 30 seconds or so to see how that plays = out. YMMV.... Bob = homeroast = mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings= Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-7-1053740730--

5) From: Bryan Wray
Here's another Behmor roaster with a vote for the slower profiles.  I roast a lot for SO espresso, and I find with the more aggressive profiles I get a lot of that sourness that we have been speaking of (read as overly bright), and the slower profiles seem to mute this brightness a lot.  I usually use P4 for espresso roasts and P2-P3 for press/drip roasts. YMMV, but I like the product of the slower profiles.
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
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6) From: Les
Bryan,
Do you roast a one pound batch or half pound?  I am drinking a drip pot of
El Savaldor that I did on P2 and I am finding that it is excellent.  A very
complex and rich cup of coffee.
Les
On Dec 24, 2007 7:40 AM, Bryan Wray  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Eddie Dove
Les,
Details please.  I begin playing with my Behmor this week and owe some
roasts to Aaron!
I want them to be perfect!
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Referencehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On Dec 24, 2007 10:06 AM, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Rich
Bry,
How much coffee are you roasting when you find the final product is 
overly bright when using the P-1 profile?
Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: John Despres
Good morning. Could you help a new guy out and define slower profiles? 
I'm not using a Behmor, but a Gene Cafe. Details being different, I'm 
tinkering and learning... Maybe slower would work for me as well, but I 
don't know what "slow" is.
Also, what's a "SO" espresso?
John
Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182http://www.sceneitallproductions.com

10) From: Bryan Wray
Depends on where I need to take it.  If I am roasting to anything darker than city+ then I roast 1/2lb on the 1lb setting to make sure I will have enough time.  I almost always do this anyway, but if I know it is going to be something really lightly roasted, then sometimes I will do up to 14 oz on the 1lb setting, but never a full batch for fear of not making it all the way through first.  I have more problems with the Behmor not allowing me enough time than running a roast too far into second.
If I really need to do a full pound and am not going to have enough time to run 2 batches (which rarely happens) then I will put in a pound on P1, time maxed out, then start.  This is the only way that I roast a full pound though.  The Behmor can definitely roast a full pound, I just like the more mellow tastes that I get on a slower profile, which generally requires a less than full load in the basket.
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
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11) From: Bryan Wray
It's all over the place, sometimes I roast 1/2 lb and it's too bright, sometimes a full pound and it's too bright.  I think it's just that the inside of the bean is quite a bit lighter than the surface of the bean causing "acidity shock" as we have come to call it in the shop (or "tongue grabbers," I like that one too...).  Not just the typical overly bright coffees either (Kenya, Eth, some Centrals, etc...) - I actually got quite an acidity blast from a Sumatra of all things (roasted in a full pound batch on P1)... so it really depends.
Maybe some days the roasting gods are with me and other days they aren't... who knows...
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
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12) From: Bryan Wray
SO should technically be typed S.O., I'm just lazy and it stands for Single Origin Espresso (i.e. not a blend).
Slower profiles refer to 5 preset profiles on the Behmor.  "P1" is the most aggressive (or fastest) profile with "100% power all the time" from start to finish.  100% is in the temperature neighborhood of about 480F-485F. "P5" is the least aggressive (or slowest) profile with 70% (about 375F) for the first 33% of the roast cycle, then 80% (about 410F) for the next 33% of the cycle, then 90% (about 450F) for the remaining 34% of the cycle.
From the manual:http://behmor.com/roasterheat_specifications.htmlHTH
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
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13) From: Aaron
Wow, I find it interesting that you can't get full heat out of the 
behmor...  I have done several 1 pound roasts and easily got them to 
second crack on various coffees.   Not to be insulting but you do know 
you can use the keys to increase the roast time several minutes don't 
you?  The trick here is wait until it's several minutes into the roast, 
your first crack starts THEN boost the minutes... that way you are 
adding minutes to the 'hot cycle' of the behmors profile and not 
prolonging a perhaps warmup cycle by adding them right away.... if you 
look at the curves.
Aaron

14) From: Bob Hazen
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Bryan,
Your comments about brightness and being concerned about getting all the =
way through 1st set me to thinking.  (No small feat on Christmas Eve!).  =
Folks have talked of line voltage affecting other roasters and the =
Behmor should be affected in the same manner.  It makes complete sense =
to me if the Behmor has an unregulated resistive heater.  The =
dissipation of a resistor is related to the >square< of the voltage, so =
small line voltage variations could be significant.  I'm wondering if =
your line voltage is all over the map.  That you're getting too bright =
coffee at times, but are also concerned about getting all the way =
through first, might indicate line voltage variations.  If your result =
is too bright, does the roast go maximum time (indicating it's slowly =
underroasted) or do you cut it short (perhaps roasted too fast or hot).  =
One way to deal with line voltage issues is the use of a variac as =
others have mentioned.  It would work well if you want to experiment =
with the line voltage, but you will always have to keep an eye on it's =
output voltage.  Certainly, it can be adjusted, but it will give a =
percentage of your input voltage.  So if your line changes, so will the =
variac output.  Another way would be to use a Sola transformer.  They =
are >regulating< transformers that make use of a technique called =
ferroresonance.  They're expensive, heavy, and get pretty warm.  Other =
than that...  (grin)  You may spend as much for the transformer as the =
Behmor cost you.  However, they regulate their output to a fixed voltage =
that's independent of input voltage.  So any line variations become of =
no concern.
Bob

15) From: John Despres
Why, yes, it does.
Thanks, Bryan
Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182http://www.sceneitallproductions.com

16) From: Bob Hazen
Aaron,
I meant to say that as well...  The dreaded premature click, I suppose. 
Anyway,  I've not had any trouble hitting 2nd even with full pound roasts. 
It's staying out of 2nd that's been my challenge.  The momentum thing is 
taking some work to get used to.  Insufficient roast hasn't been an issue 
for me.
Also, on the added time issue.  I discussed it with Joe Behm on the phone as 
the manual completely fogged my brain.  It turned out to be simpler than I 
thought.  If you add time before you start the roast, you'll get the longer 
roast time you wanted and the percentages for each stage will stay the same. 
If you add the time after the roast starts, it will add the time to the last 
stage only.  It doesn't matter when in the roast cycle you add the time if 
it's already started.
For example if you have 15 minutes on the clock and each stage is 33% (not 
necessarily a real profile; chosen for math simplicity) you'll get three 5 
minute stages.  If you use the same profile and increase it to 18 minutes 
 >before< you start, you'll get three 6 minute stages.  However, if you start 
the roast with 15 minutes on the clock and somewhere during the roast you 
add three minutes, you will get two 5 minute stages followed by an 8 minute 
stage.
More difficult is the concept of changing time before the roast to adjust 
all the stage times and then re-adjusting time during the roast to change 
the overall roast time back to where you started.  It's best to sketch this 
out on paper, methinks; especially with P2.
With all that said, I think it's a waste of time to try to hit the 
end-of-roast time.  As long as you have enough time to hit cool at your 
discretion, you're ok.  If you want to adjust the warm-up ramp, then picking 
a roast time (A, B, C or D) and/or changing time before the roast lets you 
do that.  Once you get the roast going, you can always add time if you think 
it is going to shut off before you're ready.
Now that P2 is still a tricky one....
Bob

17) From: Sandra Andina
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Just did B/P2 for a lb. of Tanzania Meru to FC.
On Dec 24, 2007, at 9:40 AM, Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Just did B/P2 for a lb. of =
Tanzania Meru to FC.
On Dec 24, 2007, at 9:40 AM, Bryan =
Wray wrote:
Here's another Behmor roaster with a vote for the slower = profiles.  I roast a lot for SO espresso, and I find with the more = aggressive profiles I get a lot of that sourness that we have been = speaking of (read as overly bright), and the slower profiles seem to = mute this brightness a lot.  I usually use P4 for espresso roasts = and P2-P3 for press/drip roasts. YMMV, but I like the product of the = slower profiles. -Bry Bryan Wray NaDean's Coffee = Place/ Dino's Coffee Lounge Kalamazoo, MI "It is my hope = that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery = service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
Be a better = friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it = now. Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-13--970689717--

18) From: Sandra Andina
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Same here/
On Dec 24, 2007, at 10:54 AM, Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Same here/
On Dec =
24, 2007, at 10:54 AM, Bryan Wray wrote:
Depends on where I need to take = it.  If I am roasting to anything darker than city+ then I roast = 1/2lb on the 1lb setting to make sure I will have enough = time. = Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-14--970653650--

19) From: Sandra Andina
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Note that after 2:00 the boost/cut 15-sec. buttons don't work.   
Another key is to listen to from which parts of the machine those  
clicks are coming, and to keep the light off till first crack. You  
need to be able to distinguish between the clicks of the heating  
elements switching on and off (and need the light off to confirm that)  
and the snaps of first crack, which with the slower roasts can be  
similar.
On Dec 24, 2007, at 11:30 AM, Aaron wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Note that after 2:00 the =
boost/cut 15-sec. buttons don't work.  Another key is to listen to =
from which parts of the machine those clicks are coming, and to keep the =
light off till first crack. You need to be able to distinguish between =
the clicks of the heating elements switching on and off (and need the =
light off to confirm that) and the snaps of first crack, which with the =
slower roasts can be similar.
On Dec 24, 2007, at 11:30 AM, =
Aaron wrote:
Wow, I find it interesting that you can't get full heat = out of the behmor...  I have done several 1 pound roasts and easily = got them to second crack on various coffees.   Not to be = insulting but you do know you can use the keys to increase the roast = time several minutes don't you?  The trick here is wait until it's = several minutes into the roast, your first crack starts THEN boost the = minutes... that way you are adding minutes to the 'hot cycle' of the = behmors profile and not prolonging a perhaps warmup cycle by adding them = right away.... if you look at the = curves. Aarohttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings= Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-15--970404724--

20) From: Bryan Wray
Fully aware of the +/-, I think the main thing is either line voltage or heavy chaff coffees (probably more likely).  Now that I am looking over my roasting log, the ones that really seem to struggle to make it are the ones with a lot of chaff (IMV, Tree Dried Natural, etc...), so I don't know if it is just overloading the circulation in the chamber or what, but that probably has something to do with it in some capacity.  It's not anything that really bothers me, I can easily do 14oz as dark as I want, and a full 16oz on some beans, just not others.  And as far as overly bright, there are a lot of variables after the roaster too.  Rest, water temp on the machine (espresso shots), dose, grind... about 3 times as many variables on the handle side of the portafilter as the spout side...  I'm not saying that the roaster is totally responsible for bright coffee, just that I have noticed a lot of the batches I run on the more aggressive profiles seem to run a little brighter,
 that's all.
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
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21) From: Bryan Wray
This post is confusing to me... why do you need the light off?  Also, the buttons most certainly work after 2:00... not sure what you mean here...
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
---------------------------------
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22) From: Sandra Andina
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I need the light off so I can more easily see the heating elements  
glow and fade. And on my machine, the +/- buttons don't seem to  
respond after there is only 2:00 left to go on the readout.
On Dec 24, 2007, at 2:34 PM, Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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I need the light off so I can =
more easily see the heating elements glow and fade. And on my machine, =
the +/- buttons don't seem to respond after there is only 2:00 left to =
go on the readout.
On Dec 24, 2007, at 2:34 PM, Bryan Wray =
wrote:
This post is confusing to me... why do you need the light = off?  Also, the buttons most certainly work after 2:00... not sure = what you mean here... -Bry Bryan Wray NaDean's = Coffee Place/ Dino's Coffee Lounge Kalamazoo, MI "It is my = hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine = delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens. =
Never miss a = thing. = Make Yahoo your homepage. Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-18--969316365--

23) From: Bob Hazen
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Sandy,
Good point!  I've wondered just what mode the Behmor is in at any given =
time.  The glow of the heating elements is a good idea.  It would be =
great to have a mode indication in the display....  Perhaps just some =
LEDs...  It would simple to do....  I'm thinking mods now....   Uh-oh... =
 There goes my warranty...
Joe:  Plans for version 2.0?
Bob
   You need to be able to distinguish between the clicks of the heating =
elements switching on and off (and need the light off to confirm that) =
and the snaps of first crack, which with the slower roasts can be =
similar.

24) From: Aaron
Ok im curious why do you need the light off to distinguish the cracks?  
The light doesn't cycle so it's relay should not make any noise.
Aaron

25) From: Aaron
I have one of those 20 dollar Kill A watt devices on my machine... well 
actually it's a 2500 dollar inverter but I have one of those tied into 
it.  You can see exactly how many watts the thing is taking, and when 
the elements are on or off and not have to rely on the glow.
aaron

26) From: Bryan Wray
That might be something you want to get looked at, but probably the reason they don't respond is because you have already maxed out the time.  After you hit a certain point on certain profiles you can't add any more time.  I've added 15 seconds 1 second before the roast ends, but at the same time, if I have already hit the maximum time for a roast, I might not be able to add any time even if the roast still has 19:00 minutes to go.  I'm getting kind of tired, and my brain is running at about 60% right now so hopefully this makes sense.
The heating element thing definitely makes sense, but I guess I was never really that worried about it (when it's on, when it isn't...).  I just kind of studied the profile charts in the manual and went from there as far as when the roaster is going to be at what temperature and such... dunno...
my .02
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
---------------------------------
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27) From: Sandra Andina
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Because to me, sometimes first crack can sound like the click of the  
heating elements turning on and off, and that's easier to see with the  
light off.
On Dec 24, 2007, at 3:12 PM, Aaron wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Because to me, sometimes first =
crack can sound like the click of the heating elements turning on and =
off, and that's easier to see with the light off.
On Dec =
24, 2007, at 3:12 PM, Aaron wrote:
Ok im = curious why do you need the light off to distinguish the cracks? =  The light doesn't cycle so it's relay should not make any = noise. Aaron = homeroast mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings= Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-19--965761097--

28) From: Les
Eddie,
I am drinking a very fine blend from the RK drum.  I am so new to the  
Behmor, my suggestion is to send him a good RK roasted coffee!  I  
have done two roasts on P4 and 4 roasts on P2.  I hit the P2 with  
first crack just starting before 1st crack.  I ended up with an  
excellent roast.  Rich and  a lot of complexity.  I Went with P2 and  
the max time.  When the roast was going for about 5 min. hit the plus  
counter to get max time.  I then subtracted 30 seconds when full  
power came back on at the end.  I'll be trying this again!
Les
On Dec 24, 2007, at 8:13 AM, Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: Rich
After reading all of the posts to this thread I have a question.  If I 
roast 16 oz of green beans starting at 68 degrees and select the P-4 1 
Lb. profile followed, after roast start, with the addition of time to 
the max of 24:30 will this roast reliably reach second crack before cool 
starts?  I have found that P-1 will reach past the start of second crack 
but is somewhat aggressive and leaves the center of the bean under 
roasted.  Verified by cutting bean in half and looking with a 
microscope.  It seems that P-1 is too much heat energy delivered to the 
bean in too short a time period resulting in centerline under roast. 
The previous posts tend to support this theory.
So, how is p-4 and max time with 1 lb of beans working for you?
Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>

30) From: Bryan Wray
In my experience, I don't usually reach second, or if I do, I will only get 5 snaps or so into second during the cooling cycle (on P4).  I have no problems hitting second on P1, but I have the same problems you do, under-roasted in the middle.  I should play around with P3 more...
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place/
Dino's Coffee Lounge
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
       
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31) From: Rich
That is my thoughts also.  If there was more time available to tag onto 
the end of P-4 it should be the ideal profile for a good 1 lb roast.  A 
P-3 profile would provide a little more overall energy to the beans at 
the front end but the tradeoff would be a loss of 1 minute of total 
roast time.  Even going to max time at the end leg might not do it.
I think that either P-3 or P-4 are probably the better profiles for a 1 
lb batch to get a good roast, if the total time is long enough.  The 
problem is that the total max time seems to be a bit short to get to C+, 
FC or FC+ with any degree of reliability.  P-3 looks to be a better 
place to start though.
I keep looking for the Battle Short switch for the idiot interlock circuit..
Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>

32) From: Tim Harvey
Line voltage definately affects the Behmor.  I tried a location different than normal and had a hard time reaching any second cracks w/max time.  I checked the voltage of my normal location and got 110.  the different location was about 103v.  not much difference, but definately affected the roast.  I noticed the same thing on my popper roasts using the same 2 outlets.
---- Bob Hazen  wrote: 
=============
Bryan,
Your comments about brightness and being concerned about getting all the way through 1st set me to thinking.  (No small feat on Christmas Eve!).  Folks have talked of line voltage affecting other roasters and the Behmor should be affected in the same manner.  It makes complete sense to me if the Behmor has an unregulated resistive heater.  The dissipation of a resistor is related to the >square< of the voltage, so small line voltage variations could be significant.  I'm wondering if your line voltage is all over the map.  That you're getting too bright coffee at times, but are also concerned about getting all the way through first, might indicate line voltage variations.  If your result is too bright, does the roast go maximum time (indicating it's slowly underroasted) or do you cut it short (perhaps roasted too fast or hot).  
One way to deal with line voltage issues is the use of a variac as others have mentioned.  It would work well if you want to experiment with the line voltage, but you will always have to keep an eye on it's output voltage.  Certainly, it can be adjusted, but it will give a percentage of your input voltage.  So if your line changes, so will the variac output.  Another way would be to use a Sola transformer.  They are >regulating< transformers that make use of a technique called ferroresonance.  They're expensive, heavy, and get pretty warm.  Other than that...  (grin)  You may spend as much for the transformer as the Behmor cost you.  However, they regulate their output to a fixed voltage that's independent of input voltage.  So any line variations become of no concern.
Bob

33) From: Rich
Tim, I thought I saw somewhere that the Behmor was designed for 115vAC, 
if that is correct then 110 is a bit on the low side already and 103 is 
way low.  If that 103 volts is measured with no other load on the 
circuit you might have a problem that needs looking into.
Tim Harvey wrote:
<Snip>

34) From: Robert Yoder
Would the use of a variac help stretch out the C1-C2 interval (in the Behmo=
r)?  The entire roast profile?  I'm thinking of P1 with lowered or modulate=
d voltage.
 
Happy Roasting and Happy New Years everyone!
 
robert yoder> From: rich-mail> To: homeroast=
com> Subject: Re: +Behmor P4 Profile> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2007 11:57:15 -0600=
<Snip>
 > if that is correct then 110 is a bit on the low side already and 103 is =
<Snip>
t you might have a problem that needs looking into.> > Tim Harvey wrote:> >=
 Line voltage definately affects the Behmor. I tried a location different t=
han normal and had a hard time reaching any second cracks w/max time. I che=
cked the voltage of my normal location and got 110. the different location =
was about 103v. not much difference, but definately affected the roast. I n=
oticed the same thing on my popper roasts using the same 2 outlets.> > > > =
<Snip>
======> > Bryan,> > > > Your comments about brightness and bein=
g concerned about getting all the way through 1st set me to thinking. (No s=
mall feat on Christmas Eve!). Folks have talked of line voltage affecting o=
ther roasters and the Behmor should be affected in the same manner. It make=
s complete sense to me if the Behmor has an unregulated resistive heater. T=
he dissipation of a resistor is related to the >square< of the voltage, so =
small line voltage variations could be significant. I'm wondering if your l=
ine voltage is all over the map. That you're getting too bright coffee at t=
imes, but are also concerned about getting all the way through first, might=
 indicate line voltage variations. If your result is too bright, does the r=
oast go maximum time (indicating it's slowly underroasted) or do you cut it=
 short (perhaps roasted too fast or hot). > > > > One way to deal with line=
 voltage issues is the use of a variac as others have mentioned. It would w=
ork well if you want to experiment with the line voltage, but you will alwa=
ys have to keep an eye on it's output voltage. Certainly, it can be adjuste=
d, but it will give a percentage of your input voltage. So if your line cha=
nges, so will the variac output. Another way would be to use a Sola transfo=
rmer. They are >regulating< transformers that make use of a technique calle=
d ferroresonance. They're expensive, heavy, and get pretty warm. Other than=
 that... (grin) You may spend as much for the transformer as the Behmor cos=
t you. However, they regulate their output to a fixed voltage that's indepe=
ndent of input voltage. So any line variations become of no concern.> > > >=
 Bob > >

35) From: raymanowen
Oh, my Heavens!
"...got 110.  the different location was about 103v.  not much
difference..."
NOT TRUE. It's a 14% power change for a resistive heater.
The place is a Firetrap! Too many amateur Sparkys- 110v is practically a
Brownout, and I'd register a complaint with your electric utility. Most
electric appliances are specified at 120v on the nameplate in the last 30
years. 50 years ago, Heathkits were rated at 117v.
110v gives 9% less resistive power than 115v, and 103v is 20% lower power
than 115v.
Not that much? Exactly that much, and it sounds like it's keeping the
roaster well below its rated performance.
Math wizards, Step Right Up!
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Better keep 9-1-1 on your speed dial!
On Dec 31, 2007 10:38 AM, Tim Harvey 
wrote:
<Snip>

36) From: Rich
Just checked the Behmor home site.  The Behmor is specified at 1630w / 
15A 120vAC.  Less than 120 volts and you are having a power supply 
problem.  If your meter is accurate, then you are having a serious 
problem if you are reading 103 or 110 at an outlet.  Ray is more than 
correct.  Somehow I doubt that it is the utilities problem.
raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>

37) From: Aaron
You also might want to check the wiring in your fuse panel, and inside 
the receptacles.  Older houses, especially those which may have had 
aluminum wiring in them, the lugs can loosen up with age and cause this 
problem as well I have seen.  All wire can loosen with time on the lugs 
but aluminum because it's so soft, tends to be one of the worse for 
this.  Note: *TURN THE POWER OFF BEFORE DOING THIS* or you might very 
well end up doing the 60 cycle shuffle.
Give all the lugs a good cranking down make sure they are tight.  At 
that point, if you find some that are significantly loose, you might 
want to check inside the receptacle then and make sure that's all tight 
as well..  Another cause I have seen is the plugs themselves just become 
worn out.  They can corrode, get spread and not make good contact etc, 
and over time cause a big voltage drop internally.  A new one costs a 
few bucks at a hardware store.  It's hard to really see if one is loose 
inside unless you know what you are looking for, or it is evident ie 
corrosion.  Does the plug part get really warm when you roast.  If so 
then that's an indication you have a problem more nearer the plug / 
receptacle area.  Might want to try replacing the plug see if that helps 
too.  (assuming you dont have sub standard wiring coming to the plug in 
the first place(
Note:  If you are NOT an electrician, or have NO idea really what I just 
said or what you are doing then DO NOT attempt this yourself.
Also, if you said it earlier, I missed it and apologize but what is the 
voltage at the receptacle before you turn on your device.  If it's up 
where it belongs to begin with then yes you have a problem.  If it's 
kind of low to begin with, then the problem is probably with the power 
company's feed to the house.  If you do have the panel cover off, check 
the voltage across the main before and after you start your roaster.  
The change should be pretty insignificant.
Nobody here can tell you, yes, it is THIS or THAT causing the problem 
without taking an actual look at it, because that's like me telling you 
over the phone, that knock in your car is the doofulator valve 
sticking... yah Riiiiiighttt!!!!  but we can give you ideas where to 
start looking.
worse case, bring one of your electrician friends with some fresh coffee 
to come take a look at it for you.  Tell em. here Ill make you some of 
your own beans... oh DARN IT!!  the voltage is too low, I can't roast 
it,  Heyy... you are a sparky right?  ya think you can look at 
this.....  ok sneaky but it might work :)
Happy new year
Aaron

38) From: gin
good morning Aaron, happy new year.
g
---- Aaron  wrote: 
<Snip>

39) From: Michael Wascher
Not quite. 103 VAC is unexpectedly low & is a problem, but 110 VAC at a
loaded duplex outlet is perfectly acceptable.
120 VAC is the *nominal voltage*. Electrical equipment should be designed to
operated over a range of voltages higher than & lower than this nominal
voltage.
In the US the *goal *for power companies is to hold the voltage delivered at
120 VAC +/- 6%. So you could have as little as 112.8 VAC supplied to your
house. Assuming your power company is meeting their *goal*.
The National Electrical
Code(NEC)
allows no more than a 3%
voltage drop for residential applications.
So if you are at 112.8 VAC coming in to your house, there could be another
3.4 VAC drop in the house wiring. That gets you down to 109.4 volts at the
duplex outlet.
I would expect a consumer device sold in the US that is rated to operate on
*nominal *120 VAC input would be designed to operate properly for voltages
as low as 109.4 VAC measured at the device's AC plug.
BTW, the top end is about 127.2 VAC (assuming 0 voltage drop in the house
wiring).
--MikeW
*Disclaimer, I am an electrical engineer, but consumer devices is not my
area of specialty.*
On Jan 1, 2008 1:49 AM, Rich  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"About the time we think we can make ends meet, somebody moves the ends."
--Herbert Hoover

40) From: Tim Harvey
wow, when you look at it that way........ My house is only about 11 yrs old too!
TIM
---- raymanowen wrote: 
=============
Oh, my Heavens!
"...got 110.  the different location was about 103v.  not much
difference..."
NOT TRUE. It's a 14% power change for a resistive heater.
The place is a Firetrap! Too many amateur Sparkys- 110v is practically a
Brownout, and I'd register a complaint with your electric utility. Most
electric appliances are specified at 120v on the nameplate in the last 30
years. 50 years ago, Heathkits were rated at 117v.
110v gives 9% less resistive power than 115v, and 103v is 20% lower power
than 115v.
Not that much? Exactly that much, and it sounds like it's keeping the
roaster well below its rated performance.
Math wizards, Step Right Up!
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Better keep 9-1-1 on your speed dial!
On Dec 31, 2007 10:38 AM, Tim Harvey 
wrote:
<Snip>


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