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Topic: Birthday coffee (9 msgs / 277 lines)
1) From: Ken Mary
Holy crap, I'm 60 today and very glad to be alive. This season there was 
another holiday to celebrate, the one year anniversary of my heart attack
and emergency bypass surgery on Dec 18.
Reviewing my coffee history, here is my top ten list for birthday coffee:
10. Vietnam Robusta, always a choice for "change of palate". And after
drinking some you may really have to change your palate!
9.  Folger's preground decaf, after a few sips, the tongue and brain adapt
to the flavors. Being an engineer myself, I have an appreciation of the
Folgers engineers' expertise in designing and building equipment that can
turn garbage coffee into something drinkable.
8.  8 O'Clock, naturally belongs to the number 8 spot, the coffee that
started me on my homeroasting hobby by being so good and sometimes so
frustratingly bad due to so many stinkerbeans.
7.  The Unknown Coffee, my very first homeroast of the beans which came
packed in my new Melitta Aromaroast. Even at its estimated 18 years of
storage in some long forgotten warehouse, this coffee was the BEST I had
ever tasted up to that point. And that includes some famous national brand
gourmet roasted coffees. I do not want to gloss over this point lightly. My
very first inept roast of some ordinary bean almost two decades past its
prime was far better than the best the national roasters were selling to the
public at obscenely high prices. Wrap your brains around that, Gevalia and
Gloria Jeans!
6.  Brazil Cerrado, the estate was not recorded, my first roast of Sweet
Maria's coffee from a sample pack, way back on February 1, 2000. The Monte
Carmelo is one of my favorites today.
5.  Colombia Ibague Nevado, my second roast in 2000. If there was ever a
coffee that reinforced my desire to keep roasting, this was the one. Bright,
snappy, overpowering richness, ability to cut through any food, even greasy
spicy pork sausage, made it my number one coffee of that time. No Colombian
since has been that good. Apparently I was not so inept a roaster, I seemed
to have a natural aptitude for it. To this day I have had to toss out less
than a handful of roasts.
4.  Sumatra Mandheling, roasted city to city+ like a Colombian. "Sumatra"
was on the label of my favorite preroasted. Back then way before
homeroasting, were my first feelings of being "better than the rest", after
all, I was drinking SUMATRA!
3.  Uganda Bugisu, here I am getting hopelessly romantic about coffee. I
could easily get lost in the cup, so much flavor, so much chocolate, so many
different cup profiles and chocolate flavor variations from light to dark
roast. There are some very good Bugisus and some not so very good, but this
only adds to the adventure.
2.  Ethiopian Harar, a difficult choice between Harar and Sidamo. But lately
it seems much easier to find a good Harar than a Sidamo. This is serious
coffee territory. If I miss the sweetspot on a Sumatra or Colombian, no big
thing, but on a Harar I get angry. Drinking a good Harar, I am lost, but in
a different way than a Bugisu. I get intensely focused on the "proper" cup
character, the "path" that must be followed.
1.  Yemen Mocca Mattari, is what I will be roasting today. Yemens are
special occasion coffees. I would gladly offer a Harar to a friend, but
Yemens I do not share. Rather than the narrow path of a Harar, a Yemen gives
me the freedom to wander. I do not worry about the roast, as long as the
profile is close enough, the coffee will accommodate me. Yemens are a spirit
journey, a walkabout, a pilgrimage to the Earth Mother, a mystical
experience.
Best wishes to all of you in the new year. Eat healthy to be healthy.
--

2) From: Les
Ken,
Thank you for sharing your thoughts.  I identify with you on many points.  I
combine point 10 and 9 and identify with "church " coffee.  If one is
feeling hassled by roasting, a few sips of the brew they call coffee at
church will bring one back to the straight and narrow quickly.  I am missing
Uganda Bugisu and I am hoping Tom will find some this year.  Two coffees I
would change or add to your list:
1. Pacamara beans.  A good Pacamara is a delight into chocolate bliss!
2. The Gesha offerings this year were outstanding.  I enjoyed all three
origins.  A complex mysterious cup with complexity that always brought
pleasure with each sip.
Les
On 12/28/07, Ken Mary  wrote:
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3) From: Sandra Andina
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Happy birthday, Ken! Go with the Yemen Mokha.
Sandy
On Dec 28, 2007, at 11:56 AM, Ken Mary wrote:
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Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Happy birthday, Ken! Go with =
the Yemen Mokha.Sandy
On Dec 28, 2007, at 11:56 AM, =
Ken Mary wrote:
Holy crap, I'm 60 today and very glad to be alive. This = season there was another holiday to celebrate, the one year = anniversary of my heart attack and emergency bypass surgery on Dec = 18. Reviewing my coffee history, here is my top ten list for = birthday coffee: 10. Vietnam Robusta, always a choice for "change = of palate". And after drinking some you may really have to change = your palate! 9.  Folger's preground decaf, after a few sips, = the tongue and brain adapt to the flavors. Being an engineer myself, = I have an appreciation of the Folgers engineers' expertise in = designing and building equipment that can turn garbage coffee into = something drinkable. 8.  8 O'Clock, naturally belongs to the = number 8 spot, the coffee that started me on my homeroasting hobby by = being so good and sometimes so frustratingly bad due to so many = stinkerbeans. 7.  The Unknown Coffee, my very first = homeroast of the beans which came packed in my new Melitta = Aromaroast. Even at its estimated 18 years of storage in some long = forgotten warehouse, this coffee was the BEST I had ever tasted up to = that point. And that includes some famous national brand gourmet = roasted coffees. I do not want to gloss over this point lightly. = My very first inept roast of some ordinary bean almost two decades = past its prime was far better than the best the national roasters = were selling to the public at obscenely high prices. Wrap your brains = around that, Gevalia and Gloria Jeans! 6.  Brazil = Cerrado, the estate was not recorded, my first roast of Sweet Maria's = coffee from a sample pack, way back on February 1, 2000. The = Monte Carmelo is one of my favorites today. 5.  Colombia = Ibague Nevado, my second roast in 2000. If there was ever a coffee = that reinforced my desire to keep roasting, this was the one. = Bright, snappy, overpowering richness, ability to cut through any = food, even greasy spicy pork sausage, made it my number one coffee of = that time. No Colombian since has been that good. Apparently I was = not so inept a roaster, I seemed to have a natural aptitude for it. = To this day I have had to toss out less than a handful of = roasts. 4.  Sumatra Mandheling, roasted city to city+ like a = Colombian. "Sumatra" was on the label of my favorite preroasted. Back = then way before homeroasting, were my first feelings of being "better = than the rest", after all, I was drinking SUMATRA! 3. =  Uganda Bugisu, here I am getting hopelessly romantic about coffee. = I could easily get lost in the cup, so much flavor, so much = chocolate, so many different cup profiles and chocolate flavor = variations from light to dark roast. There are some very good Bugisus = and some not so very good, but this only adds to the = adventure. 2.  Ethiopian Harar, a difficult choice between = Harar and Sidamo. But lately it seems much easier to find a good = Harar than a Sidamo. This is serious coffee territory. If I miss the = sweetspot on a Sumatra or Colombian, no big thing, but on a Harar I = get angry. Drinking a good Harar, I am lost, but in a different way = than a Bugisu. I get intensely focused on the "proper" cup character, = the "path" that must be followed. 1.  Yemen Mocca Mattari, = is what I will be roasting today. Yemens are special occasion = coffees. I would gladly offer a Harar to a friend, but Yemens I do = not share. Rather than the narrow path of a Harar, a Yemen gives me = the freedom to wander. I do not worry about the roast, as long as = the profile is close enough, the coffee will accommodate me. Yemens = are a spirit journey, a walkabout, a pilgrimage to the Earth Mother, = a mystical experience. Best wishes to all of you in the = new year. Eat healthy to be = healthy. -- h= omeroast mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings= Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-5--629980566--

4) From: Les
Happy Birthday Ken, got too focused on the coffee and not the special day!
Les
On 12/28/07, Sandra Andina  wrote:
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5) From: RK
Happy Birthday Ken,
RK

6) From: Dave
Happy Birthday Ken! Enjoy that Yemen, I like 'em too.
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps

7) From: Dave Kvindlog
Happy Birthday, Ken.  Sounds like you're celebrating the right way...by
roasting coffee.  That's my kind of day.  Hope your roast is supurb and your
day special.
Best wishes,
Dave Kvindlog
iHomeroast
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
On Dec 28, 2007 11:56 AM, Ken Mary  wrote:
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8) From: Bill
Happy birthday, Ken.  Hope it was a good one.  And thanks for the wonderful
thoughts on great coffees!Bill
On Dec 28, 2007 6:15 PM, Dave Kvindlog  wrote:
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9) From: Steven Van Dyke
At 11:56 AM 12/28/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
Happy Birthday Ken!
Glad you're still here to celebrate it. 


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