HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: Choosing a knife (23 msgs / 928 lines)
1) From: Dave
I know there are some foodies out there, so I'm hoping for a little help.
A couple weeks ago I dropped my favorite knife, an 8" Sabatier chef's knife:http://tinyurl.com/2dcyclhttp://tinyurl.com/2fv292
and the blade broke off near the bolster. So I need a replacement. I
can't afford this one (but it would be really nice):http://tinyurl.com/2484mlor perhaps a Lamsonsharp:http://tinyurl.com/28mg49I'd like to keep it under about a hundred and a quarter">http://tinyurl.com/2hkf7wI'm leaning toward a Wusthof:http://tinyurl.com/2484mlor perhaps a Lamsonsharp:http://tinyurl.com/28mg49I'd like to keep it under about a hundred and a quarter
Thanks for the help;-)
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps

2) From: James Leach
Sad news!
That Fujiwara is sexy! I have a Wustof, and i'm pretty happy with it's edge
holding ability, considering it's stainless steel. i have no experience with
the others.  The Wustof i have is from the full tang "professional" series,
but i would imagine the one you linked to is equal in blade quality.
On Dec 28, 2007 1:43 PM, Dave  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Sandra Andina
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I went with Cook's Illustrated's recommendations a while ago and got a  
Forschner Victorinox at Pike Place Cutlery in Seattle. The top-rated  
chef's knife had (and still has) a plastic handle (the plastic one was  
out of stock and I went with a wooden one) and unlike more expensive  
knives is stamped, not forged. Its flexibility, sharpenability, handle  
comfort and blade shape (facilitating "rocking" while cutting) made it  
the top contender at CI magazine. Oh, and it was only thirty bucks.  
Before that, I used a 6" Chicago Cutlery.
Sandy
On Dec 28, 2007, at 12:43 PM, Dave wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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I went with Cook's =
Illustrated's recommendations a while ago and got a Forschner Victorinox =
at Pike Place Cutlery in Seattle. The top-rated chef's knife had (and =
still has) a plastic handle (the plastic one was out of stock and I went =
with a wooden one) and unlike more expensive knives is stamped, not =
forged. Its flexibility, sharpenability, handle comfort and blade shape =
(facilitating "rocking" while cutting) made it the top contender at CI =
magazine. Oh, and it was only thirty bucks. Before that, I used a 6" =
Chicago Cutlery.Sandy
On Dec 28, 2007, at 12:43 PM, =
Dave wrote:
I know there are some foodies out there, so I'm hoping for = a little help. A couple weeks ago I dropped my favorite knife, an 8" = Sabatier chef's knife: http://tinyurl.com/2dcyclhttp:/= /tinyurl.com/2fv292 and the blade broke off near the bolster. So I = need a replacement. I can't afford this one (but it would be really = nice):http://tinyurl.com/2hkf7wI'm leaning toward a = Wusthof:http://tinyurl.com/2484mlor perhaps a = Lamsonsharp:http://tinyurl.com/28mg49I'd like to keep it under = about a hundred and a quarter Thanks for the help;-) -- = Dave Some days... It's just not worth chewing through the = leather = straps homeroast = mailing = listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo = change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, = unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings= Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-6--629677387--

4) From: Sandra Andina
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Should also mention I own a Sabatier, but hardly ever use it--it's  
carbon steel, not high-carbon stainless.  I am also a huge believer in  
buying knives individually for different tasks and mixing brands  
according to what feels good in my hand and is highly rated by sources  
I respect. I have Wusthof and Henckels utility and paring knives, as  
well as a Wusthof Granton edge slicer.
On Dec 28, 2007, at 12:58 PM, Sandra Andina wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Should also mention I own a =
Sabatier, but hardly ever use it--it's carbon steel, not high-carbon =
stainless.  I am also a huge believer in buying knives individually =
for different tasks and mixing brands according to what feels good in my =
hand and is highly rated by sources I respect. I have Wusthof and =
Henckels utility and paring knives, as well as a Wusthof Granton edge =
slicer.
On Dec 28, 2007, at 12:58 PM, Sandra Andina =
wrote:
I went with Cook's = Illustrated's recommendations a while ago and got a Forschner Victorinox = at Pike Place Cutlery in Seattle. The top-rated chef's knife had (and = still has) a plastic handle (the plastic one was out of stock and I went = with a wooden one) and unlike more expensive knives is stamped, not = forged. Its flexibility, sharpenability, handle comfort and blade shape = (facilitating "rocking" while cutting) made it the top contender at CI = magazine. Oh, and it was only thirty bucks. Before that, I used a 6" = Chicago Cutlery.Sandy On Dec 28, 2007, at 12:43 PM, = Dave wrote:
I know there are some foodies out there, so I'm hoping for = a little help. A couple weeks ago I dropped my favorite knife, an 8" = Sabatier chef's knife: ">http://tinyurl.com/2fv292and =">http://tinyurl.com/2dcyclhttp://tinyurl.com/2fv292and = the blade broke off near the bolster. So I need a replacement. = I can't afford this one (but it would be really = nice):http://tinyurl.com/2hkf7wI'm leaning toward a = Wusthof:http://tinyurl.com/2484mlor perhaps a = Lamsonsharp:http://tinyurl.com/28mg49I'd like to keep it under = about a hundred and a quarter Thanks for the help;-) -- = Dave Some days... It's just not worth chewing through the = leather = straps homeroast = mailing = listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo = change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, = unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings= Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-7--629346911--

5) From: Bonnie Polkinghorn
Hello Dave,
My advice would be to go into a quality knife shop and handle the knives you
are interested in.  Each knife has a different feel and weight in your
hand.  It has to feel good to you.
Personally, I don't like style of the knives you are looking at, the ones
with the hollow bumps, are they called Santuko?.  I like the old fashioned
ones and my favorite is the 8" Wusthof classic, but that's because I like
the way it feels when I hold it and cut with it.
If you loved your Sabatier, why don't you get the same one?  The link you
sent shows it exactly in your price range.
My friends own Sonoma Cutlery,http://www.sonomacutlery.com,give them a
call, they love to talk about knives, ask for Dylan or Jodi, tell them I
recommended them, 1-800-542-8854, they are on Pacific time.  Note:  Sonoma
Cutlery does not sell any coffee, brewing or roasting equipment.
Good luck,
Bonnie Polkinghorn
On Dec 28, 2007 10:43 AM, Dave  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: peterz
Nope I am not a cook, but C is.
Back in the day, when we made money, we would buy the best knives we 
could think of. Well, nothing more expensive than Henkles, but we did 
try quite a few different brands in that price range.
Did not know any better. :)
One day I found in a thrift store a knife with a white plastic handle, 
and bought it for a quarter, remembering that lots of butcher shops use 
them back east.
This turned out to be the best knife we ever had!
Where to get more?
Searches on google were useless :(
One day whilst shopping in Costco, I spied something that looked the 
same, in the restaurant supply section.
A set of two for less than ten bucks!
Worth the risk, thought I.
Yes, very much so.
They are the same brand as the find in the thrift store.
They are wonderful!
We bought more, of different sizes! Even  Steak knives! (Paring knives)
Have been using them for more than 2 years now with nothing more than a 
touch up with a steel now and again.
Did I say C loves them?
I made a carry case for them, and she takes them to cook for church 
functions.
Other folks at the church asked where we got such great knives, and upon 
learning,
have given up their more expensive yuppie hi name knives in favor of these.
Husbands give them to spouses for Christmas and birthday gifts!
Oh my,
The secret is now out!
PeterZ
Looked on Costco web site, and they did not show up, too inexpensive I 
guess.
Dave wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Patrick R. Sklenar
Dave wrote:
<Snip>
Dave,
    I've had a full set of J.A.Henckel's knives for over a decade.  
"Professional S" handles (http://tinyurl.com/ywrjzs*). I love them.   
Based on your links, three blades, all currently $80 on Amazon, that you 
might be interested in are the
    8" Chef's Knife: http://tinyurl.com/2fhgml*    7" Santoku Knife: http://tinyurl.com/2684er*    There are definitely better blades out there.  There are definitely ">http://tinyurl.com/2gqer8*    8" Hollow ground Chef's Knife: http://tinyurl.com/2fhgml*    7" Santoku Knife: http://tinyurl.com/2684er*    There are definitely better blades out there.  There are definitely 
far more expensive blades out there.  But take care of these and they do 
a good job for many, many years.
    pat----

8) From: zane
my wife works for a woodowrking tool company and they import these japanese
knives that are pretty amazing.  and a way better deal than buying from a
big store.  they are hand made, layered steel.  we keep buying them for
wedding presents and my mother bought several as well.  everyone raves about
them.  they are the only people that import them and the guy in japan only
makes so many a year.http://www.bridgecitytools.com/ok_default.htmlthey are called japanese hattori knives.
this may seem like a plug, but i really like them, and think the
craftsmanship is about as good as it gets in terms of the japanese style
blades.
~zane

9) From: Sandra Andina
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The hollow bumps are what's called "Granton ovals," which some say  
faciliate easier slicing. "Santuko" is a particular shape originating  
in Japan, a hybrid of a traditional chef's knife and Oriental veggie  
knife. Works great for some (I have one by Wusthof), but others prefer  
a more traditional triangular shape.
On Dec 28, 2007, at 1:05 PM, Bonnie Polkinghorn wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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The hollow bumps are what's =
called "Granton ovals," which some say faciliate easier slicing. =
"Santuko" is a particular shape originating in Japan, a hybrid of a =
traditional chef's knife and Oriental veggie knife. Works great for some =
(I have one by Wusthof), but others prefer a more traditional triangular =
shape.
On Dec 28, 2007, at 1:05 PM, Bonnie Polkinghorn =
wrote:
Hello Dave,   My advice = would be to go into a quality knife shop and handle the knives you are = interested in.  Each knife has a different feel and weight in your = hand.  It has to feel good to you.   = Personally, I don't like style of the knives you are looking at, = the ones with the hollow bumps, are they called Santuko?.  I like = the old fashioned ones and my favorite is the 8" Wusthof classic, but = that's because I like the way it feels when I hold it and cut with it. =   If you loved your Sabatier, why don't you = get the same one?  The link you sent shows it exactly in your price = range.   My friends own Sonoma Cutlery, http://www.sonomacutlery.com,= give them a call, they love to talk about knives, ask for Dylan or Jodi, = tell them I recommended them, 1-800-542-8854, they are on Pacific = time.  Note:  Sonoma Cutlery does not sell any coffee, brewing = or roasting equipment.   Good = luck,   Bonnie Polkinghorn =   On Dec 28, 2007 = 10:43 AM, Dave <dbcraw> wrote: = I know there are some = foodies out there, so I'm hoping for a little help. A couple weeks = ago I dropped my favorite knife, an 8" Sabatier chef's knife: http://tinyurl.com/2fv292and the blade broke =">http://tinyurl.com/2dcyclhttp://tinyurl.com/2fv292and the blade broke = off near the bolster. So I need a replacement. I can't afford this = one (but it would be really nice): http://tinyurl.com/2hkf7wI'm leaning toward a = Wusthof: =http://tinyurl.com/2484mlor perhaps a Lamsonsharp: http://tinyurl.com/28mg49I'd like to keep it = under about a hundred and a quarter Thanks for the help;-) = -- Dave Some days... It's just not worth chewing = through the leather = straps homeroast = mailing list =http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change = your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go = to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = --Apple-Mail-8--628557277--

10) From: Mike Chester
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

11) From: Loyd Blankenship
I really love the 8" Wusthof Culinar chef's knife -- I got one for my
sister and it's her favorite knife now as well. If you're mainly going
to be breaking down veg, however, the Culinar Santuko blade is
fantastic.
-- 
Make a small loan, Make a big difference - Kiva.org

12) From: Edward Bourgeois
Many knife co. have several lines and some are now made in China.
Bought a Buck pocket knife for my nephew for xmas and was told by a
knowledgeable salesman to stay away from the China made blades(some
Bucks are made in China now) as they are very inconsistent in metal
quality.
On Dec 28, 2007 2:29 PM, Mike Chester  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Slinkster
Dave wrote:
<Snip>
I really like my 5" Kyocera ceramic santoku.  Large enough for most 
jobs, small enough to use with a very small cutting board when space is 
tight such as when I pack my kit to cook dinner at my mother's-in-law 
place in her 1/3-the-size-of-mine kitchen.  The rest of my knives are 
mostly Wusthof.  I do have a couple of restaurant-grade DexterRussel 
knives that I picked up when I was in college that seem to be both 
indispensible and indestructible so perhaps a trip to the local 
restaurant supply house is in order?

14) From: Rich
You can find them at SAMs also.  And any decent restaurant supply has 
them.  They are the Sani-Safe by Dexter Russel.  Made in USA by the way, 
also Stain free High Carbon steel.  I run mine on an old pocket fishing 
fillet knife diamond hone.  They are sharp and hold an edge.
peterz wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Dave
On Dec 28, 2007 10:43 AM, Dave  wrote:
<Snip>
Thanks for the input. I really appreciate all the constructive advice.
I really like the idea of going to a cutlery store and trying the
knives for feel. I'll have to look up a local one. The one I knew
about closed a couple months ago (before I broke my knife)...
My wife gave me a 7" Kitchenaid santoku for Christmas, but it doesn't
feel like its going to replace the sabatier.
Thanks again!
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps

16) From: Bill
Rich mentioned an old diamond hone, so I thought I'd throw in my input on
sharpeners, too.  Why not??!!  After all, our knives are only as good as
their edges.  Anyway, Spyderco makes a fantastic sharpening system, cheaper
than many of the electrics and can produce an edge that is ludicrously,
fantastically sharp.  Or not so sharp, it depends what you want.  I use it
on all of my hunting knives, as well as kitchen knives.  Here's the link:http://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details.php?productwIf we're gonna be OT, thought I'd go off topic of the OT!!!
Bill
On Dec 28, 2007 5:51 PM, Dave  wrote:
<Snip>

17) From: John Brown
their stones are very good if you have the time to do it right.
at one time that was all i used. they have been around for thirty or so 
years.  when i asked they told me the stones were artificial sapphire. 
but DMT is also very good and quicker to use. 
Bill wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Roger Lebow
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Dave, to be contrarian (why should I stop now?) I refer you to an 
article by Mark Bittman in the NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/09/dining/09mini.html?_r=1&oref=sloginThis is an article that shows how one can outfit a kitchen in high 
style for $200-300, buying solely from restaurant supply stores (that's =
important!). Since the article appeared in May of this year and may not =
be readily accessible to non-subscribers, let me extract what he says 
about knives:
I started with an eight-inch, plastic-handle stainless alloy chef’s 
knife for $10. This is probably the most essential tool in the kitchen. =
People not only obsess about knives (and write entire articles about 
them), but you can easily spend over $100 on just one. Yet go into any =
restaurant kitchen and you will see most of the cooks using this same 
plastic-handle Dexter-Russell tool. (Go to the wrong store and you’ll =
spend $20 or even $30 on the same knife.)
Well, that said, I will allow that my chef's knife is an 8" Henckels 
that I've had since the earth cooled. But you may bet that if I were to =
replace this knife I'd go for the Dexter-Russell!
Cheers,
Roger in sun-drenched SoCal
Bring on the rain!
On Dec 28, 2007, at 10:43 AM, Dave wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
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Dave, to be contrarian (why should I stop now?) I refer you to an
article by Mark Bittman in the NY Times:http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/09/dining/09mini.html?_r=1&oref=sloginThis is an article that shows how one can outfit a kitchen in high
style for $200-300, buying solely from restaurant supply stores
(that's important!). Since the article appeared in May of this year
and may not be readily accessible to non-subscribers, let me extract
what he says about knives:
I started with an eight-inch,
plastic-handle stainless alloy chef’s knife for $10. This is probably
the most essential tool in the kitchen. People not only obsess about
knives (and write entire articles about them), but you can easily
spend over $100 on just one. Yet go into any restaurant kitchen and
you will see most of the cooks using this same plastic-handle
Dexter-Russell tool. (Go to the wrong store and you’ll spend $20 or
even $30 on the same knife.)
Well, that said, I will allow that my chef's knife is an 8" Henckels
that I've had since the earth cooled. But you may bet that if I were
to replace this knife I'd go for the Dexter-Russell!
Cheers,
Roger in sun-drenched SoCal
Bring on the rain!
On Dec 28, 2007, at 10:43 AM, Dave wrote:
I know there are some foodies out there, so I'm hoping for a
little help.
A couple weeks ago I dropped my favorite knife, an 8" Sabatier chef's
knife:http://tinyurl.com/2dcyclhttp://tinyurl.com/2fv292
and the blade broke off near the bolster. So I need a replacement. I
can't afford this one (but it would be really nice):http://tinyurl.com/2484mlor perhaps a Lamsonsharp:http://tinyurl.com/28mg49I'd like to keep it under about a hundred and a quarter">http://tinyurl.com/2hkf7wI'm leaning toward a Wusthof:http://tinyurl.com/2484mlor perhaps a Lamsonsharp:http://tinyurl.com/28mg49I'd like to keep it under about a hundred and a quarter
Thanks for the help;-)
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps

19) From: Steven Van Dyke
At 12:54 AM 12/29/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
Bill's right - Sal started Spyderco around that sharpener and just 
got into making knives because of all the time he spent sharpening 
cheap knives at shows.  He thought he could do better and he was right.
My personal preference in knives is Benchmade - http://www.benchmade.com  They *do* have a kitchen set but it's 
pricey.  *Nice*, but pricey.
If you want the Cadillac of sharpeners look at the EdgePro - http://www.edgeproinc.com My ever-indulgent wife got me a 'Pro' 
model for Christmas a few years ago.  Those he makes himself so each 
one is signed - mine has my name on it as well as his but I don't 
know if that's standard or just because he knew it was a Christmas gift.
Going back to kitchen knives, ours are a mix of Chicago Cutlery and 
some *very* old 'Old Hickory' knives.  My maternal grandfather was a 
blacksmith and when I was 4 I could sharpen a knife on a grinder - 
one pass on each side, steel off the burr and you're holding a razor 
blade.  Of course, my 'fillet' knife has an unusually heavy spine 
because it began it's life as a butcher knife. ;) 

20) From: John Brown
the Dexter Russell knives are good general purpose kitchen knives.
440 C stainless steel.  the rockwell hardness is very likely to be in 
the mid to lower 50's.  which means they should be easy to sharpen, but 
won't hold the edge for long.  the same steel can be hardened to the 
upper 50's and be a better edge holding blade, but here is where product 
liability comes in.  it will be easier to break the blade by misuse.  
which might mean blood on the cutting board.
<Snip>

21) From: MSMB
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I think the quality of the knife is mostly in the quality of the steel.
There is also the question of the way it is put together: its weight,
balance, the way the steel is attached to the handle.  For a restaurant the
plastic handle must be good because there is less risk from putting them in
the dishwasher; I imagine that wooden handles will deteriorate over time due
to the water in the dishwasher; it must be more time consuming to wash the
wooden handled knives by hand (which is what I do).  Just my guess.
The last time I bought knives-probably in the mid or early 1990s-I was lead
to believe that there was a lot of cheap steel in/from Asia that was being
used in making knives.  Lots of Asian imports were flooding our markets, but
they were just beginning to become popular in Spain, where I bought my last
knives.  At that time in Madrid you could still go into a corner hardware
store and buy a very high quality 10" chef's knife for probably under $20 (I
can't remember what I paid.), just as I think I recall it being possible in
the USA back in the 1950s and 1960s.  (the hard part was getting the knives
into the USA, because when I brought my knives into the USA in my suitcase
they had to be removed and I had to be escorted to my car by airport
security).  
But I wonder if the knives that now come from  China or Korea (or using
steel from there) continue to be so maligned.  From electronics to violins
I have seen and used really terrific products from Asia.  I am even now on
the verge of purchasing a Hyundai because I have heard that the quality is
so improved (if anyone has any experiences with the Hundai let me know; I
will have to make my purchase next week); and I never would have thought of
this in the past..  So, as with the car, it seems to me that one might be a
little surer with knives made in Europe of the USA, but with a little gamble
you might end up with a very good product from Asia at a very reasonable
price.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Roger Lebow
Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2007 4:17 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +OT: Choosing a knife
Dave, to be contrarian (why should I stop now?) I refer you to an article by
Mark Bittman in the NY Times:http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/09/dining/09mini.html?_r=1&oref=sloginThis is an article that shows how one can outfit a kitchen in high style for
$200-300, buying solely from restaurant supply stores (that's important!).
Since the article appeared in May of this year and may not be readily
accessible to non-subscribers, let me extract what he says about knives:
I started with an eight-inch, plastic-handle stainless alloy chef's knife
for $10. This is probably the most essential tool in the kitchen. People not
only obsess about knives (and write entire articles about them), but you can
easily spend over $100 on just one. Yet go into any restaurant kitchen and
you will see most of the cooks using this same plastic-handle Dexter-Russell
tool. (Go to the wrong store and you'll spend $20 or even $30 on the same
knife.)
Well, that said, I will allow that my chef's knife is an 8" Henckels that
I've had since the earth cooled. But you may bet that if I were to replace
this knife I'd go for the Dexter-Russell!
Cheers,
Roger in sun-drenched SoCal
Bring on the rain!
On Dec 28, 2007, at 10:43 AM, Dave wrote:
I know there are some foodies out there, so I'm hoping for a little help.
A couple weeks ago I dropped my favorite knife, an 8" Sabatier chef's knife:http://tinyurl.com/2dcyclhttp://tinyurl.com/2fv292
and the blade broke off near the bolster. So I need a replacement. I
can't afford this one (but it would be really nice):http://tinyurl.com/2484mlor perhaps a Lamsonsharp:http://tinyurl.com/28mg49I'd like to keep it under about a hundred and a quarter">http://tinyurl.com/2hkf7wI'm leaning toward a Wusthof:http://tinyurl.com/2484mlor perhaps a Lamsonsharp:http://tinyurl.com/28mg49I'd like to keep it under about a hundred and a quarter
Thanks for the help;-)
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps

22) From: Kathleen Tinkel
Unless you want to buy dozens and dozens of knives (as I have done in 
the 40 years I have been trying to equip my kitchen properly!) you 
really must really test and feel the possible contenders. Hand feel 
is critical, especially for a chef's knife.
My hands are small and not particularly strong, so maybe perversely, 
I prefer a forged, fairly heavy chef's -- it can do much of the work 
instead of me. I also like one that rocks (rather than with a 
straight-edged blade).
I have three French-made chef's knives: 8, 10, and 12-inch. The 10 is 
my favorite all-round knife -- I use it to smash garlic, mince 
parsley (the rocking motion helps here), cut through slabs of meat, 
and everything in between.
My favorite smaller knife is a Forschner 7-inch utility knife, 
stamped, not forged. Mine is almost 30 years old, still takes and 
holds a good edge, has a nice handle. We abuse it all the time, and 
still it endures.
I guess my point is that so long as the quality of blade, handle, and 
construction are decent the main thing is to find a knife (or knives) 
that suit your hand and body and the type of work you do with them.
As others here have said, that calls for hands-on examination. Paying 
more doesn't necessarily guarantee a good fit for you. And no picture 
or mere description will do. Unless, of course, you want to end up 
with dozens of knives, many of them rarely (or never) used. 

23) From: bb
I don't agree with this.  I think you need to have one decent knife.  The
only nice knives I have are mychefs knives, because they have more heft, and
my utility knife which I use for veg.  Other than that, every knife I own is
a Forschner (Victorinox) and handedly recommend them over dexter.  They take
a much better edge, and they too are so cheap that you can abuse the hell
out of them, and just pitch them if anything especially bad happens.
On 12/29/07, Roger Lebow  wrote:
<Snip>


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