HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OTR Coffee (10 msgs / 327 lines)
1) From: Bill
I find myself on the road about 5-7 days a month.  I have put together a bag
that I carry with me whenever I travel.  In the bag, I carry:A Bodum C-Mill
Blade Grinder
A 2T scoop
A water boiler
A 1L *$s Stainless French Press
Lots of homeroast... whatever is freshly roasted.
I have 2 questions:
1.  Is there a better way to brew coffee than an unbreakable french press?
 I like that it won't break, but it's a mess to clean.  The AP seems like an
option, but does it work with a blade grinder?  How does it do at making
several cups in succession?  Are there other unbreakable options for travel
coffee?
2.  Is there a better option than the whirly-blad grinder?  I used a GSI
lexan JavaGrind, but it simply would not grind well... Should I look at the
Zass Turkish Mill?  Or is the blade fine?
Appreciate the input!
Bill

2) From: Jerry Procopio
Last year we took a 33 day cruise.  I took enough homeroast with me, vac 
sealed in small packages - along with an AP, whirly grinder, water 
boiler and stainless steel travel mugs.  Whirly grind may not be the 
best, but the AP handled it well - as well as successive brews (well two 
- sometimes three in a row anyway).  Cleanup is easy - just a puck to 
get rid of.  This was one of my concerns on a cruise ship where one 
really has to make an effort not to let *any* grounds go down the sink 
drain.
Jerry
Bill wrote:
<Snip>
begin:vcard
fn:JavaJerry
n:;JavaJerry
org;quoted-printable:JavaJerry's™ Custom Home Roasted Coffee Beans ;RK Drum roasting in Chesapeake, VA
email;internet:JavaJerry
title:HomeRoaster
tel;cell:757.373.3500
note;quoted-printable:JavaJerry's™ Custom Home Roasted Coffee Beans
=
	RK Drum roasting in Chesapeake, VA
x-mozilla-html:TRUE
urlhttp://members.cox.net/javajerry/javajerry.shtmlversion:2.1
end:vcard

3) From: ray
AEROPRESS AEROPRESS AEROPRESS Is the perfect traveling companion for what
you want its tough un breakable plastic and not to expensive $25.00 to
$30.00 and dose a great job for espresso or Americana coffee. Just google
your search engine for one

4) From: Barry Luterman
I use an AP and Zass Turkish and the results are excellent. Clean up is a
breeze, no taste of plastic from the French Press and no fines from over
extraction because of the whirly bird. In addition, if I can't  get water
hot enough for a French Press it is still hot enough for the AP.The Turkish
Zass takes up less room in my luggage and works without electricity. The
manual feature allows for camping trips and travel in foreign countries.
On Jan 1, 2008 7:18 PM, Bill  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Steven Van Dyke
At 11:18 PM 1/1/2008, you wrote:
<Snip>
Bill,
The AP is *great* for travel coffee - the paper filter helps keep the 
fines from the whirly blade out and the shorter extraction time cuts 
the bitter flavors.
The *best* travel grinder is the Turkish Zass.  The fallback one is 
the cheap plastic one you can get from places like REI - they have 
two versions, one of which is a disk shape that requires you to hold 
it over a cup or other object to act as the 'body'.
I've got a small suitcase I've lined with stiff foam (one of those 
green 'sleeping pads' they sell for camping) subdivided into 
compartments to carry my coffee stuff. 

6) From: Larry Johnson
My kit consists of a Trosser grinder, an AP, a good travel mug (12 oz), and
a one-cup immersion heater. I use the coffee maker in the hotel room for hot
water, but have the one-cup heater for backup. I only travel by car these
days (working for the state limits my range), so the size of the Trosser is
no big deal. If I were going by plane, I would get one of the Zass Turkish
or just carry my Bodum whirly-blade.
On 1/2/08, Bill  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

7) From: Sandra Andina
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My OTR setups:
A. Traveling by car, with two other bandmates who bring their own  
preground flavored (yecch) coffee with Melitta #2 pourovers, Splenda  
and half-and-half on ice:
A cloth tote bag containing:
Bodum Mini-Ibis electric kettle
Zass Turkish
Aeropress, filters, AP scoop (use the handle to stir)
Small paper basket filters in case there's an auto-drip machine in the  
room (have lost at least one Swissgold).
Extra #2 filter papers for my bandmates
Stainless steel double-sided coffee scoop (for my bandmates)
For each 2 days on the road, 1/4 lb. beans (and half as much decaf  
beans)
Plastic travel mug from truck stop
B. Flying with the family:
A small rollaboard (checked baggage) suitcase (or if enough room,  
packed in my rolling garment carrier) containing:
Same as above minus the Melitta #2 filters, plus a small French press  
in case one contrarian prefers a different varietal
1/4 lb. of each varietal per day; half as much decaf
Whirly-blade grinder (for grinding larger volumes)
I normally eschew the travel mug, as the hotels in which we stay  
usually provide china mugs; and we normally stay put for the duration  
of our trip so I needn't have "one on the road" each morning enroute  
to the next destination. And I don't keep coffee stuff in my carryon  
bags, to avoid questions and delays going through security--that dang  
laptop, cane, shoes, coat (and occasional musical instrument) are  
enough of a hassle.
Distressingly, I am noticing more and more hotels (especially luxury  
hotels) have replaced their conventional 4-cup auto-drip machines (I  
take the filter packs home with me for emergencies--or guests who  
actually prefer that stuff) with single-cup drip machines that use  
little flat filter packs and disposable plastic trays.  One or two had  
a Keurig system in the lobby breakfast bar--not too bad, but I still  
have to have my coffee before I can throw on my sundress or sweats and  
go get my breakfast; and Wingate Inns have huge airpots of freshly  
(and strongly) brewed Green Mt. coffees.  The Green Mt. filter packs  
for their in-room machines are pretty darn good if you brew with half  
as much water.
Happy New Year (no coffee yesterday because I needed to sleep and  
avoid drying my vocal cords, but my first official morning cup of the  
New Year was a Rocket Fuel ristretto today),
Sandy
On Jan 2, 2008, at 5:42 AM, Steven Van Dyke wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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My OTR setups:
A. =
Traveling by car, with two other bandmates who bring their own preground =
flavored (yecch) coffee with Melitta #2 pourovers, Splenda and =
half-and-half on ice:
A cloth tote bag = containing:Bodum Mini-Ibis electric kettleZass = TurkishAeropress, filters, AP scoop (use the handle to = stir)Small paper basket filters in case there's an auto-drip = machine in the room (have lost at least one Swissgold).Extra = #2 filter papers for my bandmatesStainless steel double-sided = coffee scoop (for my bandmates)For each 2 days on the road, = 1/4 lb. beans (and half as much decaf beans)Plastic travel = mug from truck stop
B. Flying with the = family:
A = small rollaboard (checked baggage) suitcase (or if enough room, packed = in my rolling garment carrier) containing:Same as above minus = the Melitta #2 filters, plus a small French press in case one contrarian = prefers a different varietal1/4 lb. of each varietal per day; = half as much decafWhirly-blade grinder (for grinding larger = volumes)
I = normally eschew the travel mug, as the hotels in which we stay usually = provide china mugs; and we normally stay put for the duration of our = trip so I needn't have "one on the road" each morning enroute to the = next destination. And I don't keep coffee stuff in my carryon bags, to = avoid questions and delays going through security--that dang laptop, = cane, shoes, coat (and occasional musical instrument) are enough of a = hassle.
Distressingly, I am = noticing more and more hotels (especially luxury hotels) have replaced = their conventional 4-cup auto-drip machines (I take the filter packs = home with me for emergencies--or guests who actually prefer that stuff) = with single-cup drip machines that use little flat filter packs and = disposable plastic trays.  One or two had a Keurig system in the = lobby breakfast bar--not too bad, but I still have to have my coffee = before I can throw on my sundress or sweats and go get my breakfast; and = Wingate Inns have huge airpots of freshly (and strongly) brewed Green = Mt. coffees.  The Green Mt. filter packs for their in-room machines = are pretty darn good if you brew with half as much water.
Happy New Year (no coffee = yesterday because I needed to sleep and avoid drying my vocal cords, but = my first official morning cup of the New Year was a Rocket Fuel = ristretto today),Sandy On Jan 2, = 2008, at 5:42 AM, Steven Van Dyke wrote:
= At 11:18 PM 1/1/2008, you wrote: I find myself on the road about = 5-7 days a month.  I have put together a bag that I carry with me = whenever I travel.  In the bag, I carry: A Bodum C-Mill Blade = Grinder A 2T scoop A water boiler A 1L *$s Stainless French = Press Lots of homeroast... whatever is freshly roasted. I = have 2 questions: 1.  Is there a better way to brew coffee than = an unbreakable french press?  I like that it won't break, but it's = a mess to clean.  The AP seems like an option, but does it work = with a blade grinder?  How does it do at making several cups in = succession?  Are there other unbreakable options for travel coffee? = 2.  Is there a better option than the whirly-blad = grinder?  I used a GSI lexan JavaGrind, but it simply would not = grind well... Should I look at the Zass Turkish Mill?  Or is the = blade fine?   Appreciate the input! = Bill Bill, The AP is *great* for travel coffee = - the paper filter helps keep the fines from the whirly blade out and = the shorter extraction time cuts the bitter flavors. The *best* = travel grinder is the Turkish Zass.  The fallback one is the cheap = plastic one you can get from places like REI - they have two versions, = one of which is a disk shape that requires you to hold it over a cup or = other object to act as the 'body'. I've got a small suitcase = I've lined with stiff foam (one of those green 'sleeping pads' they sell = for camping) subdivided into compartments to carry my coffee = stuff. Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina = = --Apple-Mail-13--178694886--

8) From: Bill
Jerry, Ray, Barry, Larry, Sandy, and Steven (the lone non-y person!),
Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions.  Sounds like I'm pretty
much on track to take my coffee snobbery On The Road... And it looks like
I'm doing pretty well!  I think I'll look into the Aeropress... Seems like
the way to go.  I was unsure if the AP could use whirly-blade grinds...I'm
glad to hear that it can!  I think I'll wait for a while on the Zass turkish
grinder.  But I appreciate the excited reviews of it!!!
Thanks again, and safe travels!
Bill
On Jan 2, 2008 5:15 PM, Sandra Andina  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Steven Van Dyke
At 09:10 PM 1/2/2008, you wrote:
<Snip>
Glad we could  help. :)
On our last trip we added a nice Melita whirly blade and some filters 
for the small drip pots - that way I can make the ever-indulgent wife 
a *pot* of coffee.  It's not as good as the AP cups (which aren't as 
good as our super-auto at home), but it's *much* better than the 
'stuff' they provide.  I don't  have room in my 'coffee world' bag 
for the whirly but I can tuck it into my 'regular' suitcase. 

10) From: Larry Johnson
No prob, Bill. We road warriors have to look out for each other. ;-)
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J


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