HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Outside Roasting was: OT: Satellite Internet was: Re: +reading list w/ gmail (7 msgs / 189 lines)
1) From: Bill
I'm not Jim, but I haven't roasted above 32 degrees in a month here in
Cheyenne.  I'm using a heat gun and loving it!  Today it was in the 40s,
tomorrow is supposed to be in the 50s.  Of course, I roasted a ton on the
1st and won't need any until next week...when it will be below freezing
again!
Brrrrr!
Bill
On Jan 3, 2008 8:43 PM, Paul Martin  wrote:
<Snip>

2) From: Paul Helbert
I'm not Jim either.
I've been messing about with air poppers in cold weather in an unheated
garage. The only modification to any of them has been to bypass the thermal
cut-out switch. I decided to retry a unit which had previously never been
able to get to first crack except on a hot day.
On 31 December, at ambient 38F, this machine (cold), loaded with three
ounces of Invalsa's Bolivian 4A Cumbre Suprimissimo (or whatever they call
it) stalled after ten minutes at 380F and would not go higher until I
drastically limited air flow at 16 minutes (by placing a 300 ml beaker
directly on the outlet).  At 20 minutes I terminated the roast at 460F.
Cooled between two colanders in front of fan. FC+ (oily).
On 2 January, at ambient 20F, I loaded the same machine (pre-heated one
minute) with three ounces of SM Guate. Antigua F. Retana Yellow Bourbon, but
this time I used a ten inch aluminum chimney and hand held inverted beaker
over the chimney (a gloved hand would have been smart) to control air flow.
These beans required no initial stirring. Seven minutes into the roast 380F,
applied the beaker, modulating the air flow by raising or lowering the
beaker while watching the thermometer and the movement of the beans. The
glass beaker bottom (now top) allows visibility of the bean mass. Got first
crack at eight minutes, a few initial second cracks at thirteen minutes.
Stopped at thirteen minutes at an indicated 425F. Cooled between two
colanders in front of fan. City.
As always, my experiments have too many variables. Usually I have to stir
some during the first few minutes with this type of popper. I need to see if
it was the different beans or the chimney which allowed the 2 Jan run to go
without stirring or if it was it related to the ambient temperature or
preheat.
This is about my tenth attempt to control the roast, in one machine or
another, by restriction of the outflow air. Previous experimentation
centered around glass lamp chimneys on fountain type air poppers. Some
fountain type poppers, those with the screen in bottom center (in spite of
the persistent mantra of "experts") work very well with chimney to keep the
beans from flying out. Some of my very best, repeatable roasts have been
with fountain poppers.
I'm still trying to find the perfect exhaust air throttle. A butterfly
damper comes to mind, and I may make one.  Perhaps a variable hole sort of
throttle would work better... ?
How's that for keeping it on topic!
Paul
-- 
You can win a war like you can win an earthquake.
                                              -- Bumper sticker

3) From: Paul Helbert
I'm not Jim either.
I've been messing about with air poppers in cold weather in an unheated
garage. The only modification to any of them has been to bypass the thermal
cut-out switch. I decided to retry a unit which had previously never been
able to get to first crack except on a hot day.
On 31 December, at ambient 38F, this machine (cold), loaded with three
ounces of Invalsa's Bolivian 4A Cumbre Suprimissimo (or whatever they call
it) stalled after ten minutes at 380F and would not go higher until I
drastically limited air flow at 16 minutes (by placing a 300 ml beaker
directly on the outlet). At 20 minutes I terminated the roast at 460F.
Cooled between two colanders in front of fan. FC+ (oily).
On 2 January, at ambient 20F, I loaded the same machine (pre-heated one
minute) with three ounces of SM Guatemalan Antigua F. Retana Yellow Bourbon,
but this time I used a ten inch aluminum chimney and hand held inverted
beaker over the chimney (a gloved hand would have been smart) to control air
flow. These beans required no initial stirring. Seven minutes into the roast
380F, applied the beaker, modulating the air flow by raising or lowering the
beaker while watching the thermometer and the movement of the beans. The
glass beaker bottom (now top) allows visibility of the bean mass. Got first
crack at eight minutes, a few initial second cracks at thirteen minutes.
Stopped at thirteen minutes at an indicated 425F. Cooled between two
colanders in front of fan. City.
As always, my experiments have too many variables. Usually I have to stir
some during the first few minutes with this type of popper. I need to see if
it was the different beans or the chimney which allowed the 2 Jan run to go
without stirring or if it was it related to the ambient temperature or
preheat.
This is about my tenth attempt to control the roast, in one machine or
another, by restriction of the outflow air. Previous experimentation
centered around glass lamp chimneys on fountain type air poppers. Some
fountain type poppers, those with the screen in bottom center (in spite of
the persistent mantra of "experts") work very well with chimney to keep the
beans from flying out. Some of my very best, repeatable roasts have been
with fountain poppers.
I'm still trying to find the perfect exhaust air throttle. A butterfly
damper comes to mind, and I may make one. Perhaps a variable hole sort of
throttle would work better... ?
How's that for keeping it on topic!
Paul
-- 
You can win a war like you can win an earthquake.
                                              -- Bumper sticker

4) From: Paul Helbert
I guess that double posting brings us back to the original (?) topic. My
*@&## "service provider". I had no idea the first message had gone through.
Sorry,
Paul

5) From: Mike Koenig
try putting your popper inside a cardboard box (stand it on it's end,
and leave the "top" open).  This way it will recirculate some warm
air.
Been doing that with an i-roast for years.
--mike
On Jan 3, 2008 10:43 PM, Paul Martin  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Dave Kvindlog
I was having troubles roasting in sub freezing temps using an air popper in
my unheated garage too.  Finally got satisfaction by varying the bean mass.
Not sure the weight (haven't invested in a scale yet), but the magic volume
was approximately 1/2 cup.  During warmer temps I generally roast ~1/3 cup.
The trick with this much mass is to tip the popper to get the beans moving.
I can initally get the beans rotating bottom to top (and back to front) with
the air popper tipped toward me at 20-30 degrees, then back off the angle
gradually as the beans dry out until i'm getting normal circular rotation at
0 degrees.  I sometimes use a teaspoon to help stir the beans in the early
stages to avoid burning the beans on the bottom.
The greater bean mass helps to retain the heat, and makes it possible to
achive greater bean temps despite the colder ambient temps.
Experiment, experiment, experiment (but never on your best beans!).  I got
some baked beans and vienna roasts before finding the middle ground of
success.
Thanks for the interesting idea of controlling air exhaust to control
temps.  I've often wondered if something like that might work.  I was
thinking of putting an inverted funnel or something on top as a chimney.  I
may try it now..
Good luck and happy roasting!
Dave Kvindlog
iHomeroast
Cedar Rapids, Iowa (where annual temps vary from -20 to 98 F)
On 1/4/08, Paul Helbert  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Jarred Vallozzi
Dave,
I was having the same trouble and corrected the problem by running my popper
in a cardboard box.  I taped up the box and cut a 4 inch diameter hole for
my glass chimney/exhaust.  The popper draws fresh air in from this opening,
which forces the air past the chimney and popper on its way to the intake.
As a result, the air is much warmer when it enters the intake.  I then
opened a side compartment in the box to allow fresh air to pass directly
into the intake and control roasting temp a little better.  I have now
roasted 140g with consistent results in 20 to 60 degree weather.
-Jarred
On Jan 13, 2008 12:53 PM, Dave Kvindlog  wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest