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Topic: Wet/dry processing (9 msgs / 288 lines)
1) From: John Despres
As I understand things, dry process beans produces lots of chaff and wet 
does not.
I just roasted 230g of El Salvador Cup of Excellence-Bella Vista in my 
Gene Cafe and got tons of chaff. Tom's notes on this bean says it's wet 
processed.
There were no problems whatsoever, but in my continuing education, I 
pose this question: Is there more to this processing business I'm not 
hip to?
John A C Despres
Hug your kidshttp://www.sceneitallproductions.com

2) From: John Despres
As I understand things, dry process beans produces lots of chaff and wet 
does not.
I just roasted 230g of El Salvador Cup of Excellence-Bella Vista in my 
Gene Cafe and got tons of chaff. Tom's notes on this bean says it's wet 
processed.
There were no problems whatsoever, but in my continuing education, I 
pose this question: Is there more to this processing business I'm not 
hip to?
John A C Despres
Hug your kidshttp://www.sceneitallproductions.com

3) From: Tom Ulmer
Hi John...
At the risk of sounding crass; yes.

4) From: John Despres
I don't think my entire original post went through. It should have read
"As I understand things, dry process beans produces lots of chaff and 
wet does not.
I just roasted 230g of El Salvador Cup of Excellence-Bella Vista in my 
Gene Cafe and got tons of chaff. Tom's notes on this bean says it's wet 
processed.
There were no problems whatsoever, but in my continuing education, I 
pose this question: Is there more to this processing business I'm not 
hip to? "
I was actually, hoping for a bit more information than a yes/no answer.
For some reason my posts are not being sent to me as part of the list - 
Yeah, I already checked my preferences and everything seems correct and 
nothing's changed. I get everyone else's post but not my own.
Per Mr. Ulmer's response, I can see they are being posted, but not back 
to me...
JD
Tom Ulmer wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182http://www.sceneitallproductions.com

5) From: Tom Ulmer
Possibly someone with more sense than me will chime in. 
I have read where folks have posted that there is a correlation between wet
and dry processing and the amount of chaff produced during the roast. This
does not reconcile with what I've noticed - affirming your indications.
However, the amount of chaff produced in the roast has no significance in my
roasting or cooling method so it isn't something I necessarily put much
thought to unless some blows up my nose or in my eyes.

6) From: John Despres
I'm certain my roast was not affected at all - just looking to become a 
bit more knowledgeable. The amount of beans and the resulting chaff 
quantity were, I think spot-on for the roaster; there were no clogs or a 
lot left on the beans post roast; the machine handled the job perfectly.
I just wanna be smarter!
John
Tom Ulmer wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kidshttp://www.sceneitallproductions.com

7) From: raymanowen
Neither crass nor the truncated version, I restate the obvious question-
"How did it taste?"
I thought that was the only concern- Sori na lang... -ro
On Jan 5, 2008 1:22 PM, Tom Ulmer  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

8) From: Eddie Dove
John,
It is a generalization that holds true most of the time.  Dry-process
(DP) coffees are certainly known for producing a goodly portion of
chaff, which is why the drum on your Gene Cafe has that line on it
indicating maximum filling point for DP beans so that the system is
not over-burdened with chaff.  However, there are always exceptions
and one was posted in in the not-too-distant past:
"For those who still believe DP coffees inherently have more chaff
than WP coffees rather than primarily a milling issue think again.
Guatemala - Finca San José Ocaña, a WP coffee, quite possibly has the
most chaff of any bean varietal I've ever roasted in 7 years
roasting." - miKe mcKoffee
The monikers of WP and DP are certainly worthy of note for determining
your roasting profile.
Hope this helps ...
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Referencehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On Jan 5, 2008 1:09 PM, John Despres  wrote=
:
<Snip>
m/>

9) From: C. Herlihy
Tom Ulmer  wrote:
 I don't claim to have more sense than anyone, but I do have experience in growing and processing coffee.  As far as I can tell it's more than anything the final dry milling that determines how much chaff stays on the beans. A lower tech dry mill always leaves a lot of chaff, and if dry processed coffee is involved there will also be some bits of dried cherry skin as well as the inner silverskin(chaff). You never want to see that, and specialty coffee shouldn't have any. Specialty grade Brazil (the small percentage of primo stuff from there) is often dry processed, but carefully dry milled and needn't be loaded with chaff.   A state of the art dry mill, which I'd expect a COE coffee to be run through, can be adjusted to really polish the beans after perfect sorting, or left a touch looser so as not to scrub them too hard. They'll keep better that way.  Also, some coffee varietals have deeper and tighter cracks on the flat side which hold on tight to some chaff that can't be
 milled out and this is exaggerated further in higher grown beans with even tighter cracks.
 Maybe Tom has more or better insights on the subject....
  Charlie


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