HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Aeropress vs. Chemex vs. Bodum vs. Technivorm/Clarity/Presto (32 msgs / 827 lines)
1) From: Sean Sweet
All the information on drip & press coffee is as wonderful as it is
confusing and intimidating.  I understand that both taste and budget are
very personal, but am wondering if someone can spell out, in a paragraph or
two, the pluses and minuses of the AP, Chemex and a 'proper' drip machine,
like the Technivorm.
For background: Until recently, I was Bodum (with whatever I've recently
roasted, typically Central Americans or East Africans) in the morning and
espresso (have a humble thermoblock I pull shots of Intely's Black Cat or
49th Parallel's Epic from) in the afternoon.  Then I read here about the
Aeropress.  Jumped on one, which makes a very nice Americano (not as full of
bright notes as a Clover prepared cup, of course, but in the same general
ballpark) but I feel I'm missing out on some of what I used to taste in a
regular press.  Am also concerned about the amount of coffee necessary to
make a good AP cup.  The puck is quite satisfying to expel, but uses roughly
twice the coffee as in the Bodum.
What I am hoping to learn from the group: Should I be giving a Chemex a
whirl, or do I need to stick with the AP and tweak my grounds to water
ratios (and possibly other factors)?  Or does my finicky palate suggest that
I should return to Bodum?
I can see myself keeping the AP for camping and road trips, but reverting
back to my espresso machine for lattes and Americanos (and possibly the
Bodum for morning cups).  Also like the idea and look of a Technivorm, but
$230 is a bit of a stretch (more than my grinder - a Gaggia MM).
Cheers in advance for the suggestions and comments.
Sean

2) From: Brett Mason
Hey Sean,
Any paper filter has trouble competing with a press.  Period.  It's
the rich oils that you miss...
For what it is, the AP is great.  I have one right here.  But it has a
filter, and THAT steals the dazzle.  Some have gone to modifying the
filter.  That's when I go back to my french press...
Same will be true of anything using a filter.
  (Broad statement - here come the in-defense-of-paper-filter proponents)
If you want to get closer to the press method, get a swissgold filter
and a pour over system to match...  I use my Melitta CLarity - cost me
$19.99, is no longer available, but brews like a technivorm.
If you want to modify the brewer, use Aaron's posted fix to enhance
the temperature of the drip - and add a gold filter.  Voila!
No easy answers...
Brett
On 1/8/08, Sean Sweet  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

3) From: Scott Marquardt
Poly in the Aero, but also do some major repenting of whatever techniques
are using twice the grind and giving you little on the high end. With due
respect to Alan, ignore the instructions and put your own smarts to work.
You'll soon be using a lot more water, for one thing.
The Aero, done right, will beat a Clover blind. No proof of that, yet . .
.      ;-)
Anyway, I'm a manual nut myself so of course I'd say the Chemex is a great
idea. For my part, I don't like ceding control to automation in brewing,
unless that automation is perfect and tweakable.
YMMV!
On Jan 8, 2008 1:21 PM, Sean Sweet  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Erik Snapper
Since you like press pot, I recommend the #4 SwissGold filter and a #4 cone
holder from SM. I find that it gives me a cleaner cup with more clarity but
all the richness of a press pot, for minimal investment. Only downside is
that initially it can be hard to control the flow rate (hence brew time)
with this setup.
The AP is so useful for trips that you should keep tweaking your technique.
I use the AP on trips but prefer the swissgold at home.
Lastly, I plan to try the Chemex filters in the #4 cone holder. I'm not sure
how good the fit will be, but it should be workable. You may wish to try
that as well.
On Jan 8, 2008 11:21 AM, Sean Sweet  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Ed Needham
Someone else will have to make the Aeropress comparison, but the difference 
between a manual pourover like the Chemex is in the flexibility you have in 
the temperature of the water, the method of pouring the water, and the 
configuration of the filter and filter holder.  The Chemex filter is a 
folded square or circle that has three layers on one side and one layer on 
the other side when folded correctly.  The Chemex has a fairly steep slope 
on the sides and is smooth glass, rather than a ribbed filter holder with a 
hole in the bottom.  So extraction and filtration would be different between 
the two.
I personally think a well rounded coffeegeek should have a variety of coffee 
devices and be fairly experienced with each one.  A TV would be nice, a 
Chemex is my daily choice, and an Aeropress is one I keep putting off 
purchasing.  Not sure why.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

6) From: Larry Johnson
Sean, you asked for pluses and minuses and I haven't seen many in the
other posts, so I'll jump in - reluctant as I am because I don't have
several of the brew methods you are asking about. I have two French
presses, two Moka pots, a Swissgold pourover, a Presto Scandinavian,
and an Aero Press. My favorite coffee comes from (in this order) the
French presses, the Aero Press, Moka pot, Swissgold pourover, and last
(and least) the Presto.
NOTE: When I mention "mud" in some of the following brew methods,
understand that the amount of mud in the cup depends on the amount of
fines produced by your grinder. I have a measly, poor Solis Maestro.
With a better grinder, YMMV.
The French press makes the best coffee (to me), but there's always a
bit of mud in the last swallow or two, and cleanup isn't the easiest.
Grind consistency is pretty important. From the time you pour in the
(nearly boiling) water, it takes about 3 - 4 minutes to brew.
The Aero Press runs a close second in flavor and is my travel brewer
of choice. Water temp is not very critical; about 160 degrees or
thereabouts and I can get that from the mickeymouse brewer in my hotel
room. Grind consistency is much less important, it brews a great cup
in under a minute, no mud in the cup, and cleanup is very easy. If you
want more of the coffee oils to come through, contact Scott Marquardt
(thanks again Scott) for some neat poly felt filters.
The Bialetti Moka Pot calls itself a "stovetop espresso maker". It's
not, but it makes a pretty intense cup, very clean, grind consistency
is not super-critical but more important than with the AP. Cleanup is
easier than the French Press but more work than the AP. Brewing with
the MP is more work as well. Also; you brew right on the stove element
or a hot plate. Some gas stove burners just aren't made for it and
it's obviously tough to use in travel. There's some control over
things like coffee/water ratio, brewing time, etc, but not much.
The Swissgold pourover is quick and easy, cleanup is a breeze, and you
have a lot of control over the process. Some mud but not much. I just
haven't mastered the thing to the point that I can brew as tasty a cup
as with the FP or the AP.
I bought the last 2 Prestos my local K-Mart had at $20 each (they
don't make 'em anymore I'm told) but I have yet to brew a pot in it
that I really like. I've tried paper filters and the swissgold filter,
but I'm just not happy with it. That's ok because I'm the only coffee
drinker here and brewing one cup at a time is fine with me. Other
people seem to like these brewers, but I don't.
Hope this helps.
On Jan 8, 2008 2:21 PM, Sean Sweet  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

7) From: Bryan Wray
Wow, I don't have an AP (I also don't know why I haven't purchased one yet...) but I think cleaning up the FP is a breeze, so I probably would love cleaning the AP.  All I do for cleaning the FP is dump the grounds into the garbage, fill with water, dump whatever is left down the drain, repeat, take a scrubby brush (like the ones used for cleaning steam wands on machines) and scrub the filter, rinse, fill the FP with water one more time, add 1/2 teaspoon of cafiza, insert filter and plunge to the bottom.  Takes about as long to do as it does to read... if AP cleanup is easier than that I should be in for a treat.  Then again... I'm used to cleaning commercial bunn brewers, 9-10 airpots, 3 portafilters, 3 espresso grinders, 2 bulk grinders and a 3 group commercial machine at least every other night, so not much seems difficult anymore!! ha!
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
NaDean's Coffee Place
Kalamazoo, MI
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens of Cafe Grumpy in NYC.
       
---------------------------------
Looking for last minute shopping deals?  Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.

8) From: Larry Johnson
Cleanup for the AP: Unscrew the perforated filter holder, push out the
puck (nice solid chunk of grounds w/ the filter) into the trash, pull
the plunger out, a quick wash of the three parts, set aside to dry. I
could clean 2 or 3 APs in the time it takes me to properly clean the
FP. But I do love the coffee from the FP; it's worth the little bit of
extra cleanup.
On Jan 8, 2008 9:34 PM, Bryan Wray  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J

9) From: Sandra Andina
--Apple-Mail-1-350374745
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	format=flowed;
	delsp=yes
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
That's fine for home, but just imagine my doing that in a motel room  
in the morning, while we're trying to pack up, check out, and load the  
car so we can hit the road early. My bandmates just take their paper  
filters full of spent grounds and toss them in the wastebasket, and  
don't even rinse off the plastic cones because they don't mind the  
taste.   With the AP, I just shoot the puck into the wastebasket or  
toilet, and rinse off the rubber bottom. (We usually brew into our  
travel mugs). No grounds at all for me or the maids to clean up.
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
On Jan 8, 2008, at 8:34 PM, Bryan Wray wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-1-350374745
Content-Type: text/html;
	charset-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
That's fine for home, but just =
imagine my doing that in a motel room in the morning, while we're trying =
to pack up, check out, and load the car so we can hit the road early. My =
bandmates just take their paper filters full of spent grounds and toss =
them in the wastebasket, and don't even rinse off the plastic cones =
because they don't mind the taste.   With the AP, I just shoot the =
puck into the wastebasket or toilet, and rinse off the rubber bottom. =
(We usually brew into our travel mugs). No grounds at all for me or the =
maids to clean up. =
Sandy Andinawww.myspace.com/sandyandina 
On Jan 8, 2008, =
at 8:34 PM, Bryan Wray wrote:
Wow, I = don't have an AP (I also don't know why I haven't purchased one yet...) = but I think cleaning up the FP is a breeze, so I probably would love = cleaning the AP.  All I do for cleaning the FP is dump the grounds = into the garbage, fill with water, dump whatever is left down the drain, = repeat, take a scrubby brush (like the ones used for cleaning steam = wands on machines) and scrub the filter, rinse, fill the FP with water = one more time, add 1/2 teaspoon of cafiza, insert filter and plunge to = the bottom.  Takes about as long to do as it does to read... if AP = cleanup is easier than that I should be in for a treat.  Then = again... I'm used to cleaning commercial bunn brewers, 9-10 airpots, 3 = portafilters, 3 espresso grinders, 2 bulk grinders and a 3 group = commercial machine at least every other night, so not much seems = difficult anymore!! ha! -Bry Bryan Wray NaDean's = Coffee Place Kalamazoo, MI "It is my hope that people realize = that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a = culinary art"- Chris Owens of Cafe Grumpy in NYC.
Looking for last = minute shopping deals?
Find them fast with Yahoo! = Search. = --Apple-Mail-1-350374745--

10) From: Sean Cary
Scott - have you ever tried a Swiss Gold material in the AP?  I have your
poly material and due to my move last spring and subsequent deployment here
never did the AP modification.
Wondering if the metal mesh material would be as thin as paper and still
allow all the oils through w/o needing to modify the AP?
Sean
somewhere around 30ish to be home...under 30 to leave wonderful Camp
Fallujah.
On Jan 9, 2008 1:47 AM, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Sean M. Cary
Major USMC
Tempus Fugit, Memento Mori

11) From: Rosemary Pietrasz
--Apple-Mail-4-408446259
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
just coming in out of the shadows to throw in my .02..I use the AP  
which is great, and I use a Bodum Swiss Gold drip, also good. My  
latest experiment has been using something I got for brewing tea. Its  
a Teavana. It has a very fine wire mesh and is best described as  
cross between a drip and a french press. You can control the water  
temp, the brew time, and it lets the oils through w/o the mud.  :-)
On Jan 9, 2008, at 12:42 AM, Sean Cary wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-4-408446259
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
just coming in out of the shadows to throw in my .02..I use the AP =
which is great, and I use a Bodum Swiss Gold drip, also good. My latest =
experiment has been using something I got for brewing tea. Its a =
Teavana. It has a very fine wire mesh and is best described as cross =
between a drip and a french press. You can control the water temp, the =
brew time, and it lets the oils through w/o the mud. :-)

On Jan 9, 2008, = at 12:42 AM, Sean Cary wrote:
Scott - = have you ever tried a Swiss Gold material in the AP? I have your poly = material and due to my move last spring and subsequent deployment here = never did the AP modification. Wondering if the metal mesh = material would be as thin as paper and still allow all the oils through = w/o needing to modify the AP? Sean somewhere around 30ish to = be home...under 30 to leave wonderful Camp Fallujah. On Jan 9, 2008 1:47 AM, Scott Marquardt <scott.marquardt = > wrote: Poly in the Aero, but also do some major repenting of = whatever techniques are using twice the grind and giving you little on = the high end. With due respect to Alan, ignore the instructions and put = your own smarts to work. You'll soon be using a lot more water, for one = thing. The Aero, done right, will beat a = Clover blind. No proof of that, yet . . . ;-) = Anyway, I'm a manual nut myself so of course I'd say = the Chemex is a great idea. For my part, I don't like ceding control to = automation in brewing, unless that automation is perfect and = tweakable. = YMMV! On Jan 8, 2008 1:21 PM, Sean Sweet <sean.sweet> wrote: All the information = on drip & press coffee is as wonderful as it is confusing and = intimidating. I understand that both taste and budget are very = personal, but am wondering if someone can spell out, in a paragraph or = two, the pluses and minuses of the AP, Chemex and a 'proper' drip = machine, like the Technivorm. For background: Until recently, I = was Bodum (with whatever I've recently roasted, typically Central = Americans or East Africans) in the morning and espresso (have a humble = thermoblock I pull shots of Intely's Black Cat or 49th Parallel's Epic = from) in the afternoon. Then I read here about the Aeropress. = Jumped on one, which makes a very nice Americano (not as full of bright = notes as a Clover prepared cup, of course, but in the same general = ballpark) but I feel I'm missing out on some of what I used to taste in = a regular press. Am also concerned about the amount of coffee = necessary to make a good AP cup. The puck is quite satisfying to = expel, but uses roughly twice the coffee as in the Bodum. What I = am hoping to learn from the group: Should I be giving a Chemex a whirl, = or do I need to stick with the AP and tweak my grounds to water ratios = (and possibly other factors)? Or does my finicky palate suggest that = I should return to Bodum? I can see myself keeping the AP for = camping and road trips, but reverting back to my espresso machine for = lattes and Americanos (and possibly the Bodum for morning cups). Also = like the idea and look of a Technivorm, but $230 is a bit of a stretch = (more than my grinder - a Gaggia MM). Cheers in advance for the = suggestions and comments. Sean =
-- Sean M. = Cary Major USMC Tempus Fugit, Memento = Mori = --Apple-Mail-4-408446259--

12) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Personally I would consider a Yama Vacuum Brewer with a Cona Glass 
Rod. Vac brew has a lot on common with a good drip brew, but it can 
really bring out qualities in milder coffees. On the weekends I use a 
vacuum brewer in the AM and an aeropress if I want a little more 
later. During the week we use Technivorms. I like Chemex a lot too, 
but in the winter our place is cold and you loose a lot of heat out 
the top.
Tom
All the information on drip & press coffee is as wonderful as it is 
confusing and intimidating.  I understand that both taste and budget 
are very personal, but am wondering if someone can spell out, in a 
paragraph or two, the pluses and minuses of the AP, Chemex and a 
'proper' drip machine, like the Technivorm.
For background: Until recently, I was Bodum (with whatever I've 
recently roasted, typically Central Americans or East Africans) in 
the morning and espresso (have a humble thermoblock I pull shots of 
Intely's Black Cat or 49th Parallel's Epic from) in the afternoon. 
Then I read here about the Aeropress.  Jumped on one, which makes a 
very nice Americano (not as full of bright notes as a Clover prepared 
cup, of course, but in the same general ballpark) but I feel I'm 
missing out on some of what I used to taste in a regular press.  Am 
also concerned about the amount of coffee necessary to make a good AP 
cup.  The puck is quite satisfying to expel, but uses roughly twice 
the coffee as in the Bodum.
What I am hoping to learn from the group: Should I be giving a Chemex 
a whirl, or do I need to stick with the AP and tweak my grounds to 
water ratios (and possibly other factors)?  Or does my finicky palate 
suggest that I should return to Bodum? 
I can see myself keeping the AP for camping and road trips, but 
reverting back to my espresso machine for lattes and Americanos (and 
possibly the Bodum for morning cups).  Also like the idea and look of 
a Technivorm, but $230 is a bit of a stretch (more than my grinder - 
a Gaggia MM).
Cheers in advance for the suggestions and comments.
Sean
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

13) From: Dave
google for teavana doesn't turn up any items. There is a tea
distributor, some shops and a realtor, but I can't find a teavana...
Is it a tea infuser? What does it look like?
Thanks!
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps
On Jan 9, 2008 11:21 AM, Rosemary Pietrasz  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Dave Huddle
Have a look at www.teavana.com   There's a bunch of  tea makers & infusers.
Dave
Westerville, OH
On 1/9/08, Dave  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: kevin creason
my wife has the small model of that tea maker, she won't let me try coffee
in it *yet*... It goes like this:
1. put in tea
2. pour in hot water
3. let steep
4. set on mug and it opens valve in bottom that allows the brew to drain
straight into mug via gravity.http://www.sbsteas.com/Amazing-Tea-Brewer-Set-I-pr-124.htmlThink of a Solo one-cup pour over with a valve from one of the stop-and-pour
drip brewers.
It would probably have to be a very coarse grind to drain without pressure
like the AP. Sometimes I have to really bear down on the AP or french press.
The french pull is interesting, a little cleaner, but makes too small an
amount (in too long a time compared to the AP) and I'm always afraid it'll
splash me out the pour spouts or pour holes.
On Jan 9, 2008 1:21 PM, Rosemary Pietrasz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
-Kevin
Admit your errors before someone else exaggerates them. - Andrew V. Mason

16) From: Dave
My wife has a glass tea pot with a metal filter that fits in the top:
fill filter with tea,
pour in hot water,
steep,
lift out filter with leaves.
I'll bet it would make good coffee too.
I wouldn't dare suggest it to her though.
I never thought of it before.
Good idea.
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps
On Jan 9, 2008 2:01 PM, kevin creason  wrote:
<Snip>

17) From: Sean Sweet
Thanks, as always, Larry.  I grind for the AP the same as I do for my
thermoblock espresso - 4 or 5 notches from finest on my Gaggia MM.  Much
finer than for FP.  I'll try cutting back on the coffee and adding more
water post-Aeropressing.
<Snip>

18) From: ray
This is just a bran fart for the bohmar use a prescreen the size of the
Bohmar drum screen and shake out your beans before adding them to the bohmar
save those beans for use in a different roaster or smaller drum problem
solved............

19) From: Dave
On Jan 9, 2008 4:10 PM, ray  wrote:
<Snip>
Put the beans in the Behmor drum, put it in the machine, hit the cool
button, let it run a few minutes, dump the beans that were too small
from the chaf tray, and roast.
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps

20) From: Tim Harvey
Bran gives me gas too.
---- ray  wrote: 
=============
This is just a bran fart for the bohmar use a prescreen the size of the
Bohmar drum screen and shake out your beans before adding them to the bohmar
save those beans for use in a different roaster or smaller drum problem
solved............

21) From: kevin creason
ROFLTICAD
On Jan 9, 2008 9:35 PM, Tim Harvey  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
-Kevin
Admit your errors before someone else exaggerates them. - Andrew V. Mason

22) From: Treshell
<Snip>
This is a copy of an email from a month or so ago.   You might also try the
method of inverting the whole thing as is talked about in a very long CG
thread.  Maybe someone on here could write that up for you.
 
The person that became obsessed with getting it right went this way.  What
they came up with on CG list is called Polyester Filter Felt, comes in 12x1=
2
sheets at a cost of $1.26 each.  It is sold by McMaster-Carr and is part #
6376 T11
Try this to get to themhttp://www.mcmaster.com/ then type in- polyester filter felt 5 microns
Then scroll down page.  I ordered 2 12x12 sheets that I had with in 2 days
at a total cost of $7.77
Polyester Filter Felt
Ideal for very fine filtering of water, organic solvents, organic acids,
petroleum oils, weak alkalies, and mineral acids. Sold in individually
packaged sheets for convenience. Max. temperature is 300  F. Color is
white.
          12" x 12"
5 Micron         Sheets    Sheets
Rating    Thick.    Each    Each
It works very well and seems to be reuseable for ever.
Treshell

23) From: Treshell
<Snip>
Someone might also tell you about how they thinned it a little for the extra
thickness of the new filter.  Me I did the other and shaved the edge of the
filter.
Treshell

24) From: Bill
When backpacking we carry an MSR filter.  It's like half infuser/half
pourover.  It sits in the cup, you pour or scoop boiling water through the
grounds, then you can let it sit for a few in the water if you need to.  The
Aeropress would be nice, but a bit bulky and a bit heavy for backpacking.
 Definitely nicer for traveling, though!Bill
On Jan 9, 2008 8:50 PM, kevin creason  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Gary Taylor
What is a WC9K?

26) From: Randall Nortman
On Thu, Jan 10, 2008 at 09:11:04AM -0600, Gary Taylor wrote:
<Snip>
That's the nickname this mailing list seems to have given to a coffee
brewing method I "invented" a few months ago -- stands for
"WonderClown 9000", as I sometimes use the handle "WonderClown"
online.  I guess it's a play on the "Behmor 1600".  Anyway, the method
is currently best described in this coffeegeek thread:http://www.coffeegeek.com/forums/coffee/machines/335303I suppose if it catches on, I should make a website for it or
something.  Just to reiterate my disclaimer, I have no commercial
interest in this idea, and no intellectual property rights that I know
of, so I think posting about it is not against the list policy.  You
can try this method without paying me a dime.  In fact, even if you
did want to pay me, I have nothing to sell you.
-- 
Randall

27) From: Gary Taylor
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
OK thanks Randall, I should have figured it out since I've (gt) been =
trying it.
Gary

28) From: Randall Nortman
On Thu, Jan 10, 2008 at 10:04:44AM -0600, Gary Taylor wrote:
<Snip>
Ah!  You're gt over on coffeegeek.  So you're really a co-inventor,
and it might as well be called the GT9K.
-- 
Randall

29) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
LOL the "poor mans clover" 
Has been dubbed by some as the WonderClown 9000 so we shortned it to
WC9K
The reason for Wonderclown is because I think he/she was one of the
posters on Coffee Geek that started the idea of doing this...(I could be
wrong about the name but that is what I have understood it to be)
YMMV!!!!
Dennis

30) From: Gary Taylor
<Snip>
Well I don't know about that but I've been having fun with it.
Gary (gt)

31) From: John Brown
i put the beans in the  canister then shake the canister for a few 
seconds.  this works for me.
ray wrote:
<Snip>

32) From: Scott Marquardt
On Jan 8, 2008 11:42 PM, Sean Cary  wrote:
<Snip>
There are issues with use of metal in the AP -- but it works, yes. There's
extensive discussion of that in the big AP thread at CG (including some
photomicrographs I took of an SG filter).
I don't use metal for a couple reasons, the most important being that fines
are transmitted. Swiss Gold filters are terribly elegant (as the photos
attest), but they're pretty coarse filters. As I recall, the nylon FP
filters from SM are finer.
I do have a simple way of making the poly work with the AP without modding
the cap, but alas simple does not always mean inexpensive to tool up and do.
I remain spoiled by poly. Now and then I still use paper, just for the heck
of it. Not every cup of coffee has to be perfect, after all.  ;-)
Everywhere I've used poly (including large pourover jobs), what I like most
about it is its fast throughput. Almost all literature and coffee maker
design in the past many years has emphasized tuning brewing devices to
retard throughput to be sure the brew duration is long enough. IMO, the
result has been devices that assume too much; grind variation, especially,
affects whether such devices really extract properly or, often enough,
over-extract. Fast throughput CANNOT prevent a manual pourover from
extracting sufficiently, but it absolutely empowers the user to avoid
over-extraction and coffee waste. The level of control it gives is what this
control freak is after.
- S


HomeRoast Digest