HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Drumm Motor Ideas (24 msgs / 614 lines)
1) From: Jamie Dolan
HI,
I recently acquired (ok it was free to me) my brothers 5 pound
stainless steel drumm from RK drumms.
He has not used it in quite a while, the problem he had was that he
kept burning up rotisserie motors when using it.
I have seen some rather expensive motors for these drums online, which
I might buy sometime.
I thought you might have some ideas as to what would make a good motor
for the drum. (I just know someone is going to tell me to crank it by
hand. lol)
Thanks
Jamie

2) From: Aaron
I believe RK sells motors specifically for his drums.   Go check out his 
page.
Aaron

3) From: Rich
Jamie,
Cut and paste this URL back together and look at the DCM-249.  It will 
turn the drum fast enough and will take the abuse.  I bought one to use 
with an RK but ordered the Behmor instead.  If this interests you I can 
show you how to build the mounts and the connections to the drum shaft.
URL:http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/category.cgi?query=&type=store&category&orderbyVENTORY%2Estore%5Fquantity%2CORGANIZATION%2Ecategory%2CINVENTORY%2Ebrand%2CINVENTORY%2Emodel&start&limitcategory=&template=Motors%2Ehtml&searchfields=&match=&searchtype=Rich
Jamie Dolan wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Neil Atwood
If one of Ron's drums is too expensive, and if you are handy, I've seen a
few powered very effectively by a 12v car windshield wiper motor.
You can pick one up at a wreckers for a few dollars, add a 12v car battery
and a trickle charger, and the only thing left to work out is the drive
coupling to drum.
If you're interested, I'll try and dig up some images...
Regards
Neil A.
Blue Mountains, Ozhttp://minstrygrounds.net.au- A blog about selecting, roasting and drinking
fine coffee

5) From: PJ
How about peddles and a sprocket chain :o)
PJ

6) From: Jamie Dolan
Hi Rich;
Thanks!  That looks perfect.  Making a mount seems like it would be
fairly easy to figure out. (suggestions are still more than welcome)
Do you make a direct connection to the drum or do you use some kind of
gear or pully?
Do you use a transformer and feed it with power from a 110 outlet?
Thanks again!
Jamie

7) From: Ed Needham
http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?UID08011419225558&item=5-1183&catname=
This is the same motor that RK used to use.  I'm not sure what he sells now, 
but I have one, and if you're handy with fabricating your own mounting 
bracket, it's a good one for $40.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

8) From: Jamie Dolan
I forgot to ask, What speed to I want the drum to turn at, 60 rpm
sounds too fast.
Building a mount and using one of these little motors seems like a
perfect solution.
I more than welcome any pictures / diagrams that anyone has to offer.
Thank you again
Jamie

9) From: Neil Atwood
60 rpm is fine Jamie. My RK Drum turned at 57rpm for a number of years.
Here's one article on the topic:http://www.haddon.org/Coffee/Roasting/WindscreenWiperRoasting.htm
Regards
Neil A.
Blue Mountains, Ozhttp://minstrygrounds.net.au- A blog about selecting, roasting and drinking
fine coffee

10) From: Ed Needham
60RPM makes for a good roast.  Much faster though and the beans would stick 
to the sides from the centrifugal force.  I think someone did the math and 
it was somewhere above 60, but I know 57 RPM is just fine in my 5 pound drum 
roaster.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

11) From: Rich
You can use a battery and a decent little battery charger.  This will be 
much easier than building a 120v power supply as you need 12 volts at 
about 10 amp max.  Hence a 12 volt motorcycle battery and a battery 
charger.  The battery supplies the extra juice.  there are two lugs on 
the motor that were designed for the rubber mounts used in the car. 
Electrical conduit clamps will hold it down to a block of wood.  On the 
end of the drum you need a right angle arm that will contact the ball on 
the motor output.  Motor goes round and pushes arm and drum.  This is 
easy to pick up and dump as there is no tricky connection to deal with. 
  The axis of the motor output arm and the drum need to be in reasonable 
alignment.  Height is somewhat important.  Aluminum or steel angle from 
the big box store will provide all of the bracketery required.  Some 
even comes with slots and holes which will eliminate drilling.
Any half good battery will work so buying a new one is not required. 
Lawn mower starting batteries work good also.  This solution all depends 
on what you have on hand.  Stall current is over 15A so building a 120 
->12vDC power supply is not a low cost undertaking unless you already 
have a parts collection.
Jamie Dolan wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Jim De Hoog
Jamie,
I use a two speed cordless drill on the lowest speed and set the trigger with a zip tie to turn my Ice Bucket Roaster. Pics are available on Tom's homeroaster photo sharing site.
Jim "Ice Bucket Roaster" De Hoog
----- Original Message ----
From: Jamie Dolan 
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday, January 14, 2008 6:40:26 PM
Subject: +Drumm Motor Ideas
HI,
I recently acquired (ok it was free to me) my brothers 5 pound
stainless steel drumm from RK drumms.
He has not used it in quite a while, the problem he had was that he
kept burning up rotisserie motors when using it.
I have seen some rather expensive motors for these drums online, which
I might buy sometime.
I thought you might have some ideas as to what would make a good motor
for the drum. (I just know someone is going to tell me to crank it by
hand. lol)
Thanks
Jamie

13) From: Rich
50 to 60 is the recommended speed.  That is one turn a second, or a 
little less.
Jamie Dolan wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
a long time ago I made a machine using a self contained bbq spit 
motor, which was a little bit slow but worked with the large diameter 
drum i made for it.
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

15) From: Brett Mason
Mine is just under 60 RPM.
Speed is not the problem, since the drum is enclosed in the grill...
Lack-of-speed IS a problem, because beans can scorch...
Brett
On Jan 14, 2008 7:35 PM, Jamie Dolan  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

16) From: homeroast
Dang, here I go again agreeing with you Brett! A huge misconception with
many is that drum roasting is or should be primarily conductive from the
drum. Not. But rather convection. Fast tumbling beans are heated by the air
in the drum as they tumble, convection. Bruce reported from his two day
visit last week at the factory with our just completed USRC 8 pounder it's
RPM is actually faster than 60RPM. But he didn't accurately time it by watch
or chronograph etc. Once we get it I'll put it to a stop watch.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffeehttp://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://www.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
	Sent: Monday, January 14, 2008 7:20 PM
	To: homeroast
	Subject: Re: +Drumm Motor Ideas
	
	Mine is just under 60 RPM.  
	
	Speed is not the problem, since the drum is enclosed in the grill...
	Lack-of-speed IS a problem, because beans can scorch...
	
	Brett
	
	On Jan 14, 2008 7:35 PM, Jamie Dolan < jamiedolan> wrote:
	
		I forgot to ask, What speed to I want the drum to turn at,
60 rpm 
		sounds too fast.
		
		Building a mount and using one of these little motors seems
like a
		perfect solution.
		
		I more than welcome any pictures / diagrams that anyone has
to offer.
		
		Thank you again
		
		Jamie-- 
	Cheers,
	Brett
	
http://homeroast.freeservers.com

17) From: homeroast
------=_Part_20466_13416069.1200372244928
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline
Made my day...
Fastest year so far...  Usually takes until August before Mike & I agree...
We're much more buddy-like in our old age...
Brett
On Jan 14, 2008 10:39 PM, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com------=_Part_20466_13416069.1200372244928
Content-Type: text/html; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline
Made my day...
Fastest year so far...  Usually takes until August before Mike & I agree...
We're much more buddy-like in our old age...
Brett
On Jan 14, 2008 10:39 PM, miKe mcKoffee <
mcKona> wrote:
Dang, here I go again agreeing with you Brett! A huge misconception with
many is that drum roasting is or should be primarily conductive from the
drum. Not. But rather convection. Fast tumbling beans are heated by the air
in the drum as they tumble, convection. Bruce reported from his two day
visit last week at the factory with our just completed USRC 8 pounder it's
RPM is actually faster than 60RPM. But he didn't accurately time it by watch
or chronograph etc. Once we get it I'll put it to a stop watch.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
http://www.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:
http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archives
http://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/        From: 
homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
        Sent: Monday, January 14, 2008 7:20 PM
        To: homeroast
        Subject: Re: +Drumm Motor Ideas
        Mine is just under 60 RPM.
        Speed is not the problem, since the drum is enclosed in the grill...
        Lack-of-speed IS a problem, because beans can scorch...
        Brett
        On Jan 14, 2008 7:35 PM, Jamie Dolan < jamiedolan> wrote:
                I forgot to ask, What speed to I want the drum to turn at,
60 rpm
                sounds too fast.
                Building a mount and using one of these little motors seems
like a
                perfect solution.
                I more than welcome any pictures / diagrams that anyone has
to offer.
                Thank you again
                Jamie
                
                homeroast mailing list
                http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast                To change your personal list settings (digest options,
vacations, unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings>        --">http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings>        --
        Cheers,
        Brett
        http://homeroast.freeservers.comhomeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to 
">http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
-- Cheers, Brett http://homeroast.freeservers.com------=_Part_20466_13416069.1200372244928--

18) From: homeroast
The first big gearmotor I used to drive my five pound drum was a 30 RPM 
motor.  I worked fine, but it wa big, heavy and noisy.  The newer gearmotor 
which is a Japanese 57 RPM motor like thishttp://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?UID08011419225558&item=5-1183&catname=
is quieter, smaller, and aside from speeding the roast by maybe two minutes, 
works like a charm.  Both the 30 and 57 RPM motors allowed for an even 
roast.  A negative side effect of the 57 RPM motor is that since I use an 
open ended drum, the faster motor makes some of the beans jump out the 
opening.  I am looking for a quiet, smaller gearmotor with a slower RPM to 
solve the problem.  I can't use a resistor circuit with this motor to slow 
it down.  My next motor might be a DC motor.  Much easier to control the 
speed.
Actually, I'm thinking of building a whole new roaster, with a barrel shaped 
smoker design and a vent stack already built in.  It's all in a matter of 
time.  Then I'll have two big drum roasters.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

19) From: homeroast
<Snip>
<Snip>
I use a surplus center dc gearmotor no longer available. It is controlled
with a transformer and light dimmer. A bridge rectifier supplies the dc
current. I can vary the drum speed from about 5 to 50 rpm. The few low speed
roasts that I have done seem to give a different flavor, not necessarily
better or worse. The bean colors are more uneven at low speed resulting in a
sort of melange roast. A different rotisserie roaster with its original 3
rpm drive gives similar results. With low rpm, you should not exceed about
10% load volume (as green) or mixing may not be adequate.
The output shaft drives the spit rod directly, using the same socket
connector as the original rotisserie drive. The 2.5 inch long output shaft
keeps the oven heat away from the gearbox. The drive is face mounted with
machine screws to the outer oven enclosure. No pictures.
-- 

20) From: homeroast
Ken,
Sounds like the perfect setup.  Just curious, what would you say is the 
slowest acceptable speed for an even roast, based on your experience with 
changing speeds?  You have the RK Drum right?  If not, what is the diameter?
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

21) From: homeroast
Jamie,
I'm turning my homemade drum with a variable speed drill.  Coupled to
the end of the drum's rod, I have some threaded rod, with a standard
nut attached to the end (actually two, with a lockwasher in the middle
to keep them from turning on the thread).  A socket adaptor goes in
the chuck of the drill, and a socket the same size as the nut forms a
cheap but effective coupling.  I hold the drill up with a laboratory
stand and clamp,  and set the speed with a wire tie around the
trigger.
Works great, and only cost a few dollars, since I already had the drill.
--mike
On Jan 14, 2008 7:40 PM, Jamie Dolan  wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: homeroast
I did use these motors in the very beginning and they were a really good
motor but then the supply run out, that is why I do not use motors from
Surplus center anymore.
Once the supply is gone it is usually gone for good.
I decided to go with a company that can supply the same motor year to year.
I use all Dayton motors now and have been for about 2 yrs.
50 rpm is a good speed for a 8" dia. drum
The motor Ed pointed out at surplus center would be a vary good choice for a
home project.
57 rpm is OK
Love Joy couplings and insert drivers can be bought from the same company to
drive the spit rod.
I once had the stick rate figured out for my drums and if memory serves me I
think it is about 82 rpm to stick the beans to the side of the drum like an
amusement ride
.
Good luck
RK

23) From: homeroast
Ed,
No on the RK drum. I have made some very good roasts at 3 rpm in a screen
mesh drum. But for some reason, my similar design non-perforated metal drum
needs about 5 rpm to make a good roast. Both drum sizes are about 3x3 inches
(square cross section). I have done only a few intermediate speed roasts
near 10 or 15 rpm and these results are better than 5 rpm in terms of both
taste and evenness of bean color. Any taste or color differences between 10
or 15 and the maximum 50 rpm seem to be minor. However, the "problem" with
low speed roasts in my non-perf drum is a larger fluctuation in the
temperature readings. For example, at the maximum heating rate occurring
near 75C bean temp, the meter readout at low rpm varies as much as +/- 4C,
while at 50 rpm it is +/- 1C. This is assumed to be the result of the
contact of the thermocouple with hotter and colder beans. Nearly all of my
roasts are at 50 rpm since the lower temperature fluctuation gives more
stable readings for manual control. Also, the high speed gives me the
feeling that the temperature is equal throughout the entire bean mass.
My opinion on drum speed is go for the maximum. However, the design of the
lifting vanes will influence the rpm. Large vanes may throw beans forcefully
against the drum wall and result in broken beans. Small vanes or none at all
will allow maximum drum speed and minimal breakage.
If you buy a drum, go with the mfr's recommended speed.
--
----------
<Snip>
<Snip>

24) From: homeroast
Thank you everyone for all the great information and suggestions.
This will be a weekend project for me in the new few weeks.  I will
post back with my results once I get it up and going.
Thanks again
Jamie


HomeRoast Digest