HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Actual roasting question! (20 msgs / 1192 lines)
1) From: homeroast
--_fbbaad9f-d4a3-4adc-b2f8-bba693ddbe8d_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Hello everyone,
 
          So I've often wondered if you miss a particular beans "best" roas=
t degree if it throws the bean off so much that it won't be good?
 
I guess what I am asking is will any home-roasted bean taste better that st=
ore bought or can you actually ruin a bean depending on how it was roasted(=
Assuming you roast past first and don't turn the beans into charcoal)??  I'=
d like to try and figure out if I am doing anything wrong.
 
I ask because from reading some of the descriptions of coffee on the list I=
 just don't seem to get these results.  I am a cream/sugar person but I alw=
ays taste my coffee black before I add anything as a sort of  'cupping'.  I=
 will say that everything I've ever roasted is waaaay more tolerable to me =
black than anything store-bought.  What is also amazing is that I can tell =
big differences in taste even after adding a bit of cream/sugar.  I have co=
me across many coffees I flat out didn't like even with cream/sugar in them=
.
 
I will admit another issue is that I've never kept track of anything.  I ha=
ve just now started to log everything so I'm sure that will help.  I didn't=
 even keep track of some of the coffee's that we truly enjoyed and now I ha=
ve to find them all over again!
 
I'm currently using the SC/TO setup and a Solis maestro plus.  I brew mostl=
y in a french press anywhere from 3-4 minutes.  On the Solis it says I am '=
4' clicks finer than the coarsest setting.  I'm not familiar with exactly h=
ow the grind should look though.  I have tried finer grinds for drip just t=
o see how the solis grinds and it seems to me that it grinds waaaay on the =
fine side compared to what the grinder actually says.
 
I might as well add that this last batch of beans I did are 2 years old and=
 have been sitting in the plasitc SM bags they came in.  Not sure what a st=
ale bean looks like.  They look/smell ok to me.  Lately my coffee seems too=
 bitter.  I don't mind a little bitter(love guinness!) but it just seems li=
ke it was pure bitterness.  I do have fresh greens from SM and will be roas=
ting those soon, hopefully with better results.
 
So if anyone has some advice for this old noob I would sure appreciate it.
 
Ron
 
 
 
 
 
          
From: allon: homeroast: Re: =
+Avoid Roasted PeanutsDate: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 09:57:51 -0500
On Jan 18, 2008, at 2:38 AM, Andy Thomas  wrote:
If you can blow air throught he beans -- as in a popper or a collander-and-=
fan setup -- you should be able to blow the Styrofoam out of the beans. Do =
it outside...in someone else's yard. :-)
These aren't whole peanuts; teeny fragments of styrofoam stuck to the beans=
 with static. Air MIGHT be enough, but I wouldn't rely on it without furthe=
r inspection. And hey, it was only 2# of beans, so not really worth the ext=
ra effort.
The ideal would be to charge the beans with the same charge as the peanut b=
its. What is the dielectric constant of green NMPP?
-
allon
Climb to the top of the charts! Play the word scramble challenge with st=
ar power.http://club.live.com/star_shuffle.aspx?icid=starshuffle_wlmailtextlink_ja=n=
--_fbbaad9f-d4a3-4adc-b2f8-bba693ddbe8d_
Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
FONT-SIZE: 10pt;
FONT-FAMILY:Tahoma
}
Hello everyone,
 
          So I've often wonder=
ed if you miss a particular beans "best" roast degree if it throws the bean=
 off so much that it won't be good?
 
I guess what I am asking is will any home-roasted bean taste better that st=
ore bought or can you actually ruin a bean depending on how it was roasted(=
Assuming you roast past first and don't turn the beans into charcoal)??&nbs=
p; I'd like to try and figure out if I am doing anything wrong.
 
I ask because from reading some of the descriptions of coffee on the list&n=
bsp;I just don't seem to get these results.  I am a cream/sugar person=
 but I always taste my coffee black before I add anything as a sort of=
  'cupping'.  I will say that everything I've ever roasted is waa=
aay more tolerable to me black than anything store-bought.  What is al=
so amazing is that I can tell big differences in taste even after =
;adding a bit of cream/sugar.  I have come across many coffees I flat =
out didn't like even with cream/sugar in them.
 
I will admit another issue is that I've never kept track of anything. =
 I have just now started to log everything so I'm sure that will help. =
; I didn't even keep track of some of the coffee's that we truly enjoyed an=
d now I have to find them all over again!
 
I'm currently using the SC/TO setup and a Solis maestro plus.  I brew =
mostly in a french press anywhere from 3-4 minutes.  On the Solis it s=
ays I am '4' clicks finer than the coarsest setting.  I'm not familiar=
 with exactly how the grind should look though.  I have tried finer gr=
inds for drip just to see how the solis grinds and it seems to me that it g=
rinds waaaay on the fine side compared to what the grinder actually sa=
ys.
 
I might as well add that this last batch of beans I did are 2 years old and=
 have been sitting in the plasitc SM bags they came in.  Not sure what=
 a stale bean looks like.  They look/smell ok to me.  Lately my c=
offee seems too bitter.  I don't mind a little bitter(love guinness!)&=
nbsp;but it just seems like it was pure bitterness.  I do have fresh g=
reens from SM and will be roasting those soon, hopefully with better result=
s.
 
So if anyone has some advice for this old noob I would sure appreciate it.<=
BR>
 
Ron
 
 
 
 
 
          
From: allon
To: homeroast
Subje=
ct: Re: +Avoid Roasted Peanuts
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 09:57:51 -0500
=
On Jan 18, 2008, at 2:38 AM, Andy Thomas <adt0611> wrote:
If you can blow air throught he beans -- as i=
n a popper or a collander-and-fan setup -- you should be able to blow the S=
tyrofoam out of the beans. Do it outside...in someone else's yard. :-)
These aren't whole peanuts; teeny fragments of styrofoam stuck to the =
beans with static. Air MIGHT be enough, but I wouldn't rely on it without f=
urther inspection. And hey, it was only 2# of beans, so not really worth th=
e extra effort.

The ideal would be to charge the beans with the same charge as the pea= nut bits. What is the dielectric constant of green NMPP?
- allon
Climb to the top of the charts!= Play the word scramble challenge with star power. Play now! = --_fbbaad9f-d4a3-4adc-b2f8-bba693ddbe8d_--

2) From: homeroast
------=_Part_6680_19013918.1200696933048
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Disposition: inline
Here comes a comment from an Old Boob hisself.
The problem with achieving the flavors from coffee has less to do with the
roast or your method of roasting than it does the grinder, IMO.
There is a Grind Adjustment Ring in the Solis Maestro series of grinders,
which means you can recalibrate the grinder. I received mine set to grind
much finer than the grind icons. Kyle Anderson, pres. Baratza, was extremel=
y
helpful.
Drop him a line at  and tell him your grinder is
grinding too fine. At the least, he will send instructions on how to
recalibrate your grind adjustment.
Cheers, Mabuhay, tung h -RayO, aka Opa
Sweet Maria's does not sell good coffee- it was rejected before they took
delivery.
On Jan 18, 2008 9:44 AM, Ron Feroni < rferoni> wrote:
<Snip>
s
<Snip>
now
<Snip>
 I
<Snip>
 a
<Snip>
ms
<Snip>
.
<Snip>
f
<Snip>
huffle_wlmailtextlink_jan>
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
------=_Part_6680_19013918.1200696933048
Content-Type: text/html; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Disposition: inline
Here comes a comment from an Old Boob hisself.
The problem with achi=
eving the flavors from coffee has less to do with the roast or your method =
of roasting than it does the grinder, IMO. 
There is a Grind Adjustm=
ent Ring in the Solis Maestro series of grinders, which means you can recal=
ibrate the grinder. I received mine  set to grind much finer than the grind=
 icons.
Kyle Anderson, pres. Baratza, was extremely helpful. 
Drop him a lin=
e at <kyle.anderson=
.net> and tell him your grinder is grinding too fine. At the least, =
he will send instructions on how to recalibrate your grind adjustment.
Cheers, Mabuhay, tung h -RayO, aka Opa
Sweet Maria's =
does not sell good coffee- it was rejected before they took delivery.
On Jan 18, 2008 9:44 AM, Ron Feroni <
rferoni=
m> wrote:
Hello everyone,
 
          So I've often wo=
ndered if you miss a particular beans "best" roast degree if it t=
hrows the bean off so much that it won't be good?
 
I guess what I am asking is will any home-roasted bean taste better that st=
ore bought or can you actually ruin a bean depending on how it was roasted(=
Assuming you roast past first and don't turn the beans into charcoal)??=
  I'd like to try and figure out if I am doing anything wrong.
 
I ask because from reading some of the descriptions of coffee on the list&n=
bsp;I just don't seem to get these results.  I am a cream/sugar pe=
rson but I always taste my coffee black before I add anything as a sor=
t of  'cupping'.  I will say that everything I've eve=
r roasted is waaaay more tolerable to me black than anything store-bought.&=
nbsp; What is also amazing is that I can tell big differences in taste =
;even after adding a bit of cream/sugar.  I have come across many=
 coffees I flat out didn't like even with cream/sugar in them.
 
I will admit another issue is that I've never kept track of anything.&n=
bsp; I have just now started to log everything so I'm sure that will he=
lp.  I didn't even keep track of some of the coffee's that we =
truly enjoyed and now I have to find them all over again!
 
I'm currently using the SC/TO setup and a Solis maestro plus.  I b=
rew mostly in a french press anywhere from 3-4 minutes.  On the Solis =
it says I am '4' clicks finer than the coarsest setting.  I=
9;m not familiar with exactly how the grind should look though.  I hav=
e tried finer grinds for drip just to see how the solis grinds and it seems=
 to me that it grinds waaaay on the fine side compared to what the gri=
nder actually says.
 
I might as well add that this last batch of beans I did are 2 years old and=
 have been sitting in the plasitc SM bags they came in.  Not sure what=
 a stale bean looks like.  They look/smell ok to me.  Lately my c=
offee seems too bitter.  I don't mind a little bitter(love guinnes=
s!) but it just seems like it was pure bitterness.  I do have fre=
sh greens from SM and will be roasting those soon, hopefully with better re=
sults.
 
So if anyone has some advice for this old noob I would sure appreciate it.<=
br>
 
Ron
 
 
 
 
 
          
From: allon=
oactive.org
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Avoid=
 Roasted Peanuts
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 09:57:51 -0500
On Jan 18, 2008, at 2:38 AM, Andy Thomas <adt0611> wrote:
If you can blow air throught he beans -- as i=
n a popper or a collander-and-fan setup -- you should be able to blow the S=
tyrofoam out of the beans. Do it outside...in someone else's yard. :-)
These aren't whole peanuts; teeny fragments of styrofoam stuck to =
the beans with static. Air MIGHT be enough, but I wouldn't rely on it w=
ithout further inspection. And hey, it was only 2# of beans, so not really =
worth the extra effort.
The ideal would be to charge the beans with the same charge as the pea=
nut bits. What is the dielectric constant of green NMPP?
-
allon
Climb to the top of the charts!  =
Play the word scramble challenge with star power. 
Play now!

-- "When the theme hi= ts the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty Wichita (ex= - NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976 ------=_Part_6680_19013918.1200696933048--

3) From: homeroast
Hello Ron,
You asked, "So I've often wondered if you miss a particular beans
"best" roast degree if it throws the bean off so much that it won't be
good?"
Nope.  Unless you set fire to it or only bake the beans a little, you
will most likely find the coffee to be better than anything else you
have had.  "Missing" the roast, periodically will only help you decide
which level of roast is best for your taste buds.  After all, that is
what is is all about and everyone's tastes are different.
I have thoroughly enjoyed home-roasted coffee from a Cinnamon Roast
(didn't finish 1st crack) all the way through French Roast (Sweet
Maria's French Roast Blend) and everything in between.  Some coffees,
I like best when I roast two batches to different levels of roast,
then mix them together, a melange (Mexico Organic Nayarit Terruno
comes to mind).
My wife and I are diametrically apposed with respect to taste buds and
tasting coffee.  I only drink my coffee black and can smell and taste
every single thing in there and contemplate how I could have changed
the flavors by doing different things during the roast, whereas my
wife uses cream and sugar and says, "Mmmmmm, good coffee."  She does
humor though and always sips it black ...
RayO, gives great advice on the grinder; he would know.  Also, how old
are the burrs and when was the last time it was cleaned ... can
contribute to some bitterness.
When you get some of your new coffees, share some of your notes with
us and will will be glad to help!  We look forward to hearing more
from you!
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Stop telling God how big your storm is.
Instead, tell the storm how big your God is.
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Referencehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/

4) From: homeroast
Ron,
Generally, the only "Bad" roasts I've had were those that I baked by
roasting too slow.  I did a lot of these when I was experimenting with
trying to slow down my iRoast. A baked roast can taste pretty bad.
--mike
On Jan 18, 2008 11:44 AM, Ron Feroni  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: homeroast
--_19650835-d03a-4768-9b49-b3aa1d7623a8_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
RayO, everyone,
 
          I emailed Kyle so just waiting for a response now.  I failed to m=
ention that I also have a Mazzer(luigi?)I got off ebay a year or so ago.  I=
 only used it a few times though as I am in the process of making a spout f=
or it.  It was sort of on the back-burner.  I think maybe I'll push up the =
project a bit so I can actully use it.  Then I will be able to compare brew=
 results between the Solis and the Mazzer.  I even have new burrs in the Ma=
zzer! 
 
Thanks,
Ron 
From: raymanowen: homeroast: Re: +=
Actual roasting question!Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 15:55:33 -0700Here comes a =
comment from an Old Boob hisself.The problem with achieving the flavors fro=
m coffee has less to do with the roast or your method of roasting than it d=
oes the grinder, IMO. There is a Grind Adjustment Ring in the Solis Maestro=
 series of grinders, which means you can recalibrate the grinder. I receive=
d mine set to grind much finer than the grind icons. Kyle Anderson, pres. B=
aratza, was extremely helpful. Drop him a line at  and tell him your grinder is grinding too fine. At the least, he will se=
nd instructions on how to recalibrate your grind adjustment. Cheers, Mabuha=
y, tung h -RayO, aka OpaSweet Maria's does not sell good coffee- it was =
rejected before they took delivery.
On Jan 18, 2008 9:44 AM, Ron Feroni < rferoni> wrote:
Hello everyone,           So I've often wondered if you miss a particular b=
eans "best" roast degree if it throws the bean off so much that it won't be=
 good? I guess what I am asking is will any home-roasted bean taste better =
that store bought or can you actually ruin a bean depending on how it was r=
oasted(Assuming you roast past first and don't turn the beans into charcoal=
)??  I'd like to try and figure out if I am doing anything wrong.  I ask be=
cause from reading some of the descriptions of coffee on the list I just do=
n't seem to get these results.  I am a cream/sugar person but I always tast=
e my coffee black before I add anything as a sort of  'cupping'.  I will sa=
y that everything I've ever roasted is waaaay more tolerable to me black th=
an anything store-bought.  What is also amazing is that I can tell big diff=
erences in taste even after adding a bit of cream/sugar.  I have come acros=
s many coffees I flat out didn't like even with cream/sugar in them.  I wil=
l admit another issue is that I've never kept track of anything.  I have ju=
st now started to log everything so I'm sure that will help.  I didn't even=
 keep track of some of the coffee's that we truly enjoyed and now I have to=
 find them all over again!  I'm currently using the SC/TO setup and a Solis=
 maestro plus.  I brew mostly in a french press anywhere from 3-4 minutes. =
 On the Solis it says I am '4' clicks finer than the coarsest setting.  I'm=
 not familiar with exactly how the grind should look though.  I have tried =
finer grinds for drip just to see how the solis grinds and it seems to me t=
hat it grinds waaaay on the fine side compared to what the grinder actually=
 says.  I might as well add that this last batch of beans I did are 2 years=
 old and have been sitting in the plasitc SM bags they came in.  Not sure w=
hat a stale bean looks like.  They look/smell ok to me.  Lately my coffee s=
eems too bitter.  I don't mind a little bitter(love guinness!) but it just =
seems like it was pure bitterness.  I do have fresh greens from SM and will=
 be roasting those soon, hopefully with better results.  So if anyone has s=
ome advice for this old noob I would sure appreciate it. Ron              =
 
From: allon: homeroast: Re: =
+Avoid Roasted Peanuts Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 09:57:51 -0500
On Jan 18, 2008, at 2:38 AM, Andy Thomas  wrote:
If you can blow air throught he beans -- as in a popper or a collander-and-=
fan setup -- you should be able to blow the Styrofoam out of the beans. Do =
it outside...in someone else's yard. :-) 
These aren't whole peanuts; teeny fragments of styrofoam stuck to the beans=
 with static. Air MIGHT be enough, but I wouldn't rely on it without furthe=
r inspection. And hey, it was only 2# of beans, so not really worth the ext=
ra effort. 
The ideal would be to charge the beans with the same charge as the peanut b=
its. What is the dielectric constant of green NMPP?
-
allon
Climb to the top of the charts!  Play the word scramble challenge with star=
 power. Play now!-- "When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Vir=
gil Fox at the Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
Climb to the top of the charts! Play the word scramble challenge with st=
ar power.http://club.live.com/star_shuffle.aspx?icid=starshuffle_wlmailtextlink_ja=n=
--_19650835-d03a-4768-9b49-b3aa1d7623a8_
Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
FONT-SIZE: 10pt;
FONT-FAMILY:Tahoma
}
RayO, everyone,
 
          I emailed Kyle =
so just waiting for a response now.  I failed to mention that I also h=
ave a Mazzer(luigi?)I got off ebay a year or so ago.  I only used it a=
 few times though as I am in the process of making a spout for it.  It=
 was sort of on the back-burner.  I think maybe I'll push up the proje=
ct a bit so I can actully use it.  Then I will be able to compare brew=
 results between the Solis and the Mazzer.  I even have new burrs in t=
he Mazzer! 
 
Thanks,
Ron 
From: raymanowen
To: homeroast
Subjec=
t: Re: +Actual roasting question!
Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2008 15:55:33 -0700<=
BR>
Here comes a comment from an Old Boob hisself.
The problem wi=
th achieving the flavors from coffee has less to do with the roast or your =
method of roasting than it does the grinder, IMO. 
There is a Grind =
Adjustment Ring in the Solis Maestro series of grinders, which means you ca=
n recalibrate the grinder. I received mine set to grind much finer than the=
 grind icons. Kyle Anderson, pres. Baratza, was extremely helpful. 
=
Drop him a line at <kyle.an=
derson> and tell him your grinder is grinding too fine. =
At the least, he will send instructions on how to recalibrate your grind ad=
justment. 
Cheers, Mabuhay, tung h -RayO, aka Opa
Sweet Ma=
ria's does not sell good coffee- it was rejected before they took delivery.=
On Jan 18, 2008 9:44 AM, Ron Feroni < rferoni> wrote:
Hello everyone,
 
       =
;   So I've often wondered if you miss a particular beans "best" =
roast degree if it throws the bean off so much that it won't be good?
&n=
bsp;
I guess what I am asking is will any home-roasted bean taste better=
 that store bought or can you actually ruin a bean depending on how it was =
roasted(Assuming you roast past first and don't turn the beans into charcoa=
l)??  I'd like to try and figure out if I am doing anything wrong.  
So if anyone has some advice for this old noob I would sure ap=
preciate it.
 
Ron
 
 
 
 
&n=
bsp;
          
From: allon
Subject: Re: +Avoid Roasted Peanuts 
Date: Fri, 18 J=
an 2008 09:57:51 -0500
On Jan 18, 2008, at 2:38 AM, Andy Thomas <adt0611> wrote:
If you can blow air throught he beans -- as in a=
 popper or a collander-and-fan setup -- you should be able to blow the Styr=
ofoam out of the beans. Do it outside...in someone else's yard. :-) =
These aren't whole peanuts; teeny fragments of styrofoam stuck to the =
beans with static. Air MIGHT be enough, but I wouldn't rely on it without f=
urther inspection. And hey, it was only 2# of beans, so not really worth th=
e extra effort. 
The ideal would be to charge the beans with the same charge as the pea=
nut bits. What is the dielectric constant of green NMPP?
-
allon
Climb to the top of the charts!  Play the word scramble challenge with=
 star power. Play now!=

-- "When the theme hits the bass, I dance= the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTze= r- 1976
Climb to the top of the charts! Play th= e word scramble challenge with star power. Pl= ay now! = --_19650835-d03a-4768-9b49-b3aa1d7623a8_--

6) From: homeroast
You will love that Mazzer!!!!
Eddie
-- 
Stop telling God how big your storm is.
Instead, tell the storm how big your God is.
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Referencehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On Jan 18, 2008 7:36 PM, Ron Feroni  wrote:
<Snip>
o
<Snip>
  I
<Snip>
for
<Snip>
ew
<Snip>
e
<Snip>
ely
<Snip>
is
<Snip>
ast
<Snip>
 I
<Snip>
'.
<Snip>
me
<Snip>
l
<Snip>
now
<Snip>
tly
<Snip>
4'
<Snip>
w
<Snip>
nd
<Snip>
ms
<Snip>
.
<Snip>
f
<Snip>
ns
<Snip>
er
<Snip>
ra
<Snip>
tar
<Snip>
hty
<Snip>

7) From: homeroast
You can roast so that you *miss* the characteristics of the bean that 
make it special. Whether that means you have ruined it is another 
question. For example, in general folks often roast Yirgs fairly light. 
You can have a good cup of coffee from a FC+ one, but it doesn't have 
the characteristic taste of a Yirgacheffe.
As for whether any home roasted bean will taste better than any store 
roasted bean, well, it probably depends on the store and the skill of 
the home roaster. I am quite sure that any bean Eddie, or Mike, or so 
many other folks here produce will beat hands down any bean I can buy in 
Red Deer, but my own roasts compared to the best beans available 
commercially in a little bigger city, urmmm, nope.
Vicki
Ron Feroni wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>

8) From: homeroast
Vicki
Did I understand you right that Yirgacheffe needs to go beyond FC+ if so 
what would you suggest   by the way I use a HG/BM     because of your site 
at coffeecrone it is very informative,detailed and so easy understood (even 
I could get it) thanks so much
PJ

9) From: homeroast
No. I roast my Yirgs to C+ in general. In fact, Tom once wrote, "Yirgs 
roasted too dark are just a crying shame!" See: http://sweetmarias.com/coffee.africa.ethiopia.html#eth_fto_YirgacheffeI have accidentally taken a Yirg further. It tastes OK, but not like a 
Yirgacheffe, at least not to me.
v
PJ wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: homeroast
My bitter taster seems different from others in that I have never tasted 
bitterness in any coffee ever.
Others have stated that brewing too cold can lead to bitterness. French
presses cool much too fast to keep optimal brewing temperature for the
proper time. You should boil two volumes of water for your press, the first
is to heat up the press pot. Dump this after 30 seconds or so, add grounds
to the press and then the remaining water. You can also insulate the press
with a cloth cover during the steep.
Another problem with most press users is grinding way too coarse. I
recommend a grind a step or two above espresso. You may have to reduce the
amount of grounds.
Roasting too dark may lead to bitterness. I always avoid going more than a
few snaps into second. Faster profiles with a few snaps leave more beans at
fullcity- and IMO better taste than slower profiles with most of the beans
at fc to fc+. These darker roasts convert the sweet chocolate flavors into
bittersweet. Maybe this is what you do not like.
If your old greens have dried out, you may have to roast them more
carefully. The temperature may rise faster than normal. You can try to
rehydrate old beans. Others have had good results adding some water to the
beans and leaving them sit for 15 minutes to an hour. A rough calculation
shows that one tablespoon of water (15 ml) will raise a pound of beans from
9% to 12% moisture.
-- 

11) From: homeroast
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------050604000405090801070100
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Hey, Ken.  Aside from SM 's general moisture content chart 
http://www.sweetmarias.com/moisturecontents.html),is there another way 
to learn the content of each bean before roasting? I don't know if at 
the moment, in depth moisture information would be of help, but what the 
heck, let's throw it into the mix of things to think about. There are 
tools to measure wood moisture, but the two probes are too far apart to 
get into a single bean...
Just trying to stay confused :-)
John
Ken Mary wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions 
JD's Coffee Provoked Ramblings 
--------------050604000405090801070100
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
  
  
Hey, Ken.  Aside from SM 's general
moisture content chart
(http://www.sweetmarias.com/moisturecontents.html),is there another
way to learn the content of each bean before roasting? I don't know if
at the moment, in depth moisture information would be of help, but what
the heck, let's throw it into the mix of things to think about. There
are tools to measure wood moisture, but the two probes are too far
apart to get into a single bean...
Just trying to stay confused :-) 
John
Ken Mary wrote:
  My bitter taster seems different from others in that I have never tasted 
bitterness in any coffee ever.
Others have stated that brewing too cold can lead to bitterness. French
presses cool much too fast to keep optimal brewing temperature for the
proper time. You should boil two volumes of water for your press, the first
is to heat up the press pot. Dump this after 30 seconds or so, add grounds
to the press and then the remaining water. You can also insulate the press
with a cloth cover during the steep.
Another problem with most press users is grinding way too coarse. I
recommend a grind a step or two above espresso. You may have to reduce the
amount of grounds.
Roasting too dark may lead to bitterness. I always avoid going more than a
few snaps into second. Faster profiles with a few snaps leave more beans at
fullcity- and IMO better taste than slower profiles with most of the beans
at fc to fc+. These darker roasts convert the sweet chocolate flavors into
bittersweet. Maybe this is what you do not like.
If your old greens have dried out, you may have to roast them more
carefully. The temperature may rise faster than normal. You can try to
rehydrate old beans. Others have had good results adding some water to the
beans and leaving them sit for 15 minutes to an hour. A rough calculation
shows that one tablespoon of water (15 ml) will raise a pound of beans from
9% to 12% moisture.
  
-- 
John A C Despres
 
  John A C Despres
  John A C Despres
  14
  17
  2004-08-19T12:50:00Z
  2008-01-11T19:46:00Z
  1
  32
  187
  1
  1
  218
  11.5606
 
 
  Print
  75
  Clean
  Clean
  
  false
  false
  false
  MicrosoftInternetExplorer4
 
 
 
<!--
 /* Style Definitions */
 p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
	{mso-style-parent:"";
	margin:0in;
	margin-bottom:.0001pt;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:12.0pt;
	font-family:"Times New Roman";
	mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
	{color:blue;
	text-decoration:underline;
	text-underline:single;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
	{color:purple;
	text-decoration:underline;
	text-underline:single;}
@page Section1
	{size:8.5in 11.0in;
	margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;
	mso-header-margin:.5in;
	mso-footer-margin:.5in;
	mso-paper-source:0;}
div.Section1
	{page:Section1;}
-->
 /* Style Definitions */
 table.MsoNormalTable
	{mso-style-name:"Table Normal";
	mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
	mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
	mso-style-noshow:yes;
	mso-style-parent:"";
	mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
	mso-para-margin:0in;
	mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
	mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
	font-size:10.0pt;
	font-family:"Times New Roman";
	mso-ansi-language:#0400;
	mso-fareast-language:#0400;
	mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

John A C Despres

Hug your kids

616.437.9182 Scene It All Productions

JD’s Coffee Provoked Ramblings

--------------050604000405090801070100--

12) From: homeroast
------=_Part_3433_9037710.1200751937856
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline
I use my presspot differently, Ken.  I grind very coarse, and use quite a
bit more coffee than most do.  I get a nice sweet pot this way...
I mention it, because msot folks seem to like their presspot with a very
fine grind, and I don't.  I am an equal-opportunity contrarian at times, and
this is one...
Happy Pressin,
Brett
On Jan 19, 2008 7:45 AM, Ken Mary  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com------=_Part_3433_9037710.1200751937856
Content-Type: text/html; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline
I use my presspot differently, Ken.  I grind very coarse, and use quite a bit more coffee than most do.  I get a nice sweet pot this way...
I mention it, because msot folks seem to like their presspot with a very fine grind, and I don't.  I am an equal-opportunity contrarian at times, and this is one...
Happy Pressin,
Brett
On Jan 19, 2008 7:45 AM, Ken Mary <kdmary> wrote:
My bitter taster seems different from others in that I have never tasted
bitterness in any coffee ever.
Others have stated that brewing too cold can lead to bitterness. French
presses cool much too fast to keep optimal brewing temperature for the
proper time. You should boil two volumes of water for your press, the first
is to heat up the press pot. Dump this after 30 seconds or so, add grounds
to the press and then the remaining water. You can also insulate the press
with a cloth cover during the steep.
Another problem with most press users is grinding way too coarse. I
recommend a grind a step or two above espresso. You may have to reduce the
amount of grounds.
Roasting too dark may lead to bitterness. I always avoid going more than a
few snaps into second. Faster profiles with a few snaps leave more beans at
fullcity- and IMO better taste than slower profiles with most of the beans
at fc to fc+. These darker roasts convert the sweet chocolate flavors into
bittersweet. Maybe this is what you do not like.
If your old greens have dried out, you may have to roast them more
carefully. The temperature may rise faster than normal. You can try to
rehydrate old beans. Others have had good results adding some water to the
beans and leaving them sit for 15 minutes to an hour. A rough calculation
shows that one tablespoon of water (15 ml) will raise a pound of beans from
9% to 12% moisture.
--
homeroast mailing list
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
-- Cheers, Brett http://homeroast.freeservers.com------=_Part_3433_9037710.1200751937856--

13) From: homeroast
Vicki makes and excellent point.  Were I to live near places that
roast and brew exceptional coffee, my perspective might be different.
Eddie
-- 
Stop telling God how big your storm is.
Instead, tell the storm how big your God is.
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Referencehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On Jan 19, 2008 5:40 AM, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: homeroast
Go get a cup of Starbucks if you need to taste burnt bitter coffee!
PS: expensive too!

15) From: homeroast
I keep convincing myself that the original moisture in reasonably fresh 
beans is not important, and that the roast can be controlled if needed by
watching the bean temperature response and crack sound.
I just roasted a Mexican Chiapas which seems to have very high moisture,
first crack is more or less continuous popping from start to finish. I am
thinking about giving this lot of beans more drying time or a slower profile
to remove more water before first. I have not been getting the
superchocolatey flavors typical of this origin.
The real way to measure moisture is to heat a weighed quantity of beans in
an oven at 105C for a suitable time until there is no more weight change.
But then who has enough time and the proper equipment to do this?
--
----------
<Snip>
<Snip>
single bean...
<Snip>

16) From: homeroast
I agree about who has extra time - Then what to do with the dried out 
beans? Quick roast 'em?
So, a steady, continued popping in first crack is an indicator of higher 
moisture? That's good to know and will now be noted as such in my logs.
Ken Mary wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions 
JDs Coffee Provoked Ramblings 

17) From: homeroast
brett won't like this, but i agree with him. ;)
i really think ken has the contrarian viewpoint as the directions with
presses suggest a coarser grind. iirc.
fwiw, i have an insulated (vacuum) press pot (stainless by nisan). i
think SM sells an insulated stainless pot. i have also seen a double
wall glass pot on bodum's site.
On 1/19/08, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
-Kevin
Admit your errors before someone else exaggerates them. - Andrew V. Mason

18) From: homeroast
------=_Part_7713_11067080.1200927551868
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline

On 1/21/08, kevin creason  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com------=_Part_7713_11067080.1200927551868
Content-Type: text/html; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline
<a small mob of large-grinding contrarians is seen hastening through the streets, carrying sweet smelling french presses and displaying hideous grins>
On 1/21/08, kevin creason <ckevinj> wrote:
brett won't like this, but i agree with him. ;)
i really think ken has the contrarian viewpoint as the directions with
presses suggest a coarser grind. iirc.
fwiw, i have an insulated (vacuum) press pot (stainless by nisan). i
think SM sells an insulated stainless pot. i have also seen a double
wall glass pot on bodum's site.
On 1/19/08, Brett Mason <homeroast> wrote:
> I use my presspot differently, Ken.  I grind very coarse, and use quite a
> bit more coffee than most do.  I get a nice sweet pot this way...
>
> I mention it, because msot folks seem to like their presspot with a very
> fine grind, and I don't.  I am an equal-opportunity contrarian at times, and
> this is one...
>
> Happy Pressin,
> Brett
>
> On Jan 19, 2008 7:45 AM, Ken Mary <kdmary> wrote:
>
> > My bitter taster seems different from others in that I have never tasted
> > bitterness in any coffee ever.
> >
> > Others have stated that brewing too cold can lead to bitterness. French
> > presses cool much too fast to keep optimal brewing temperature for the
> > proper time. You should boil two volumes of water for your press, the
> > first
> > is to heat up the press pot. Dump this after 30 seconds or so, add grounds
> > to the press and then the remaining water. You can also insulate the press
> > with a cloth cover during the steep.
> >
> > Another problem with most press users is grinding way too coarse. I
> > recommend a grind a step or two above espresso. You may have to reduce the
> > amount of grounds.
> >
> > Roasting too dark may lead to bitterness. I always avoid going more than a
> > few snaps into second. Faster profiles with a few snaps leave more beans
> > at
> > fullcity- and IMO better taste than slower profiles with most of the beans
> > at fc to fc+. These darker roasts convert the sweet chocolate flavors into
> > bittersweet. Maybe this is what you do not like.
> >
> > If your old greens have dried out, you may have to roast them more
> > carefully. The temperature may rise faster than normal. You can try to
> > rehydrate old beans. Others have had good results adding some water to the
> > beans and leaving them sit for 15 minutes to an hour. A rough calculation
> > shows that one tablespoon of water (15 ml) will raise a pound of beans
> > from
> > 9% to 12% moisture.
> > --
> >
> > homeroast mailing list
> > http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast> > To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
> > unsvbscribes) go to
> > http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings> >
>
>
>
> --
> Cheers,
> Brett
>
> http://homeroast.freeservers.com>
--
-Kevin
Admit your errors before someone else exaggerates them. - Andrew V. Mason
homeroast mailing list
">http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
-- Cheers, Brett http://homeroast.freeservers.com ------=_Part_7713_11067080.1200927551868--

19) From: homeroast
------=_Part_12609_28514861.1200931467618
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline
Of coarse, a chunky grind and a 4 minute steep.
On Jan 21, 2008 9:59 AM, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>
--
MichaelB
------=_Part_12609_28514861.1200931467618
Content-Type: text/html; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline
Of coarse, a chunky grind and a 4 minute steep.
On Jan 21, 2008 9:59 AM, Brett Mason <homeroast> wrote:
<a small mob of large-grinding contrarians is seen hastening through the streets, carrying sweet smelling french presses and displaying hideous grins> 
On 1/21/08, kevin creason <ckevinj> wrote: 
brett won't like this, but i agree with him. ;)
i really think ken has the contrarian viewpoint as the directions with
presses suggest a coarser grind. iirc.
fwiw, i have an insulated (vacuum) press pot (stainless by nisan). i
think SM sells an insulated stainless pot. i have also seen a double
wall glass pot on bodum's site.
On 1/19/08, Brett Mason <homeroast> wrote:
> I use my presspot differently, Ken.  I grind very coarse, and use quite a
> bit more coffee than most do.  I get a nice sweet pot this way...
>
> I mention it, because msot folks seem to like their presspot with a very
> fine grind, and I don't.  I am an equal-opportunity contrarian at times, and
> this is one...
>
> Happy Pressin,
> Brett
>
> On Jan 19, 2008 7:45 AM, Ken Mary <kdmary> wrote:
>
> > My bitter taster seems different from others in that I have never tasted
> > bitterness in any coffee ever.
> >
> > Others have stated that brewing too cold can lead to bitterness. French
> > presses cool much too fast to keep optimal brewing temperature for the
> > proper time. You should boil two volumes of water for your press, the
> > first
> > is to heat up the press pot. Dump this after 30 seconds or so, add grounds
> > to the press and then the remaining water. You can also insulate the press
> > with a cloth cover during the steep.
> >
> > Another problem with most press users is grinding way too coarse. I
> > recommend a grind a step or two above espresso. You may have to reduce the
> > amount of grounds.
> >
> > Roasting too dark may lead to bitterness. I always avoid going more than a
> > few snaps into second. Faster profiles with a few snaps leave more beans
> > at
> > fullcity- and IMO better taste than slower profiles with most of the beans
> > at fc to fc+. These darker roasts convert the sweet chocolate flavors into
> > bittersweet. Maybe this is what you do not like.
> >
> > If your old greens have dried out, you may have to roast them more
> > carefully. The temperature may rise faster than normal. You can try to
> > rehydrate old beans. Others have had good results adding some water to the
> > beans and leaving them sit for 15 minutes to an hour. A rough calculation
> > shows that one tablespoon of water (15 ml) will raise a pound of beans
> > from
> > 9% to 12% moisture.
> > --
> >
> > homeroast mailing list
> > http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast
> > To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
> > unsvbscribes) go to
> > http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Cheers,
> Brett
>
> http://homeroast.freeservers.com>
--
-Kevin
Admit your errors before someone else exaggerates them. - Andrew V. Mason
homeroast mailing list
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
">http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
-- Cheers, Brett http://homeroast.freeservers.com
-- MichaelB ------=_Part_12609_28514861.1200931467618--

20) From: homeroast
Coarse grind here, as well. But I steep for 5 minutes most of the time, 
these days.
Brett, I'll try your method - how much coffee do you use to how much water?
Thanks!
John
MichaelB wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions 
JDs Coffee Provoked Ramblings 


HomeRoast Digest