HomeRoast Digest


Topic: What a difference... (9 msgs / 378 lines)
1) From: homeroast
I received the thermometer (and some more coffee...my stash is growing) 
from SM yesterday, and got excited and wished to try the i-Roast 2 with 
the thermometer to see if I could see a difference.  Wow...the 
difference is night and day!  Special thanks to Ross for the off-list 
help, and strong suggestion to buy a thermometer. :-)
Here are some random observations:
Caveat:
1) when using the thermometer for the first time, you might wish to try 
to remove the blue thing at the tip of the thermocouple.  My first batch 
with the new thermocouple had blue plastic on about 30% of the beans.  
The second batch showed no further sign of melting from the thing, but I 
had scrapped a lot of it off by then. And honestly, this may be because 
on the first batch I did not take into account the expansion of the bean 
and  the probe was too deep in the coffee.  As the beans expanded, they 
pretty much covered the blue plastic thing.  On the second roast, I did 
take the bean expansion into account and seated the thermocouple just to 
the top of the green beans.  This seemed to work perfectly. So, don't 
use your "good stuff" for the first roast.
2) To mount the thermocouple,  I ran it through an existing hole in the 
fine chaff screen top of the i-Roast, then through one of the holes that 
hold on the rubber o-ring to the piece of the top that fits the roast 
chamber.  This allows me to still mount the vent hood...e.g. the dryer 
hose to run out the window.  If any of you are interested in pictures of 
this, let me know and I will upload them to where you can see them.
3) I am by no means an experienced home-roaster with the knowledge and 
information many of the folks on this list have. I have roasted maybe 50 
batches of beans, and many of those roasts were, to me, undrinkable.  I 
now understand why. :-)  I offer this information for other newbies lost 
in the wealth of information, as a way to pay back for all the help I 
was offered.  YMMV!
So, it turns out I WAS hearing 1st and second crack after all...I just 
did not know it.  With the thermocouple attached, and know what the bean 
mass temperature was, I paid particular attention to the sounds at 
certain key temperatures.  I distinctly heard first and second crack on 
these two test roasts, so I now have my "reference" sample. :-)
The profile I used on these roasts was: 350-2 min, 370-2 min, 390-2 min, 
405-2 min, 450-4 min. Coffee was the India Mallali Estate tree-dried. 
(one of my favorite coffees from SM)
I let the roast begin, and waited two and one half minutes, then logged 
the internal vs. external temperature.  That data looks like this:
12 minute total roast time:
Time remaining:    Internal (i-Roast) temp:    External (thermocouple) temp:
9:30   356   323
9:00   361   353
8:30   367   360
8:00   370   370
7:30   376   381
7:00   380   383
6:30   378   391
-> 1st crack at 6:08
6:00   376   406 -> first crack fully moving
5:30   392   412
5:00   408   419
4:30   408   431
-> 2nd crack at 4:04
4:00   450   452 
3:45 active (rolling?) second crack.
3:35 hit cool to end this roast
The result is a very nice roast...the best I have gotten from the 
i-Roast.  The reason the other roasts were not so good was because I was 
stopping them way early I think, or charring them. I am sitting here 
drinking the result, and it is very nice. Nice chocolate flavor, with 
just a hint of spice and sweetness.  Medium body, low acidity.  I drink 
my coffee black and I LIKE this coffee, a lot! The only coffee I have 
roasted I like better is the El Salvador-Siberia, and SM is out of that! 
:-( (so am I) Keep in mind I am no professional cupper, but in coffee, 
like in art, I know what I like. :-)
I hope at least a couple of you find this interesting.
So, question to the list.  i really enjoyed the El Salador Siberia.  Any 
thoughts on coffees that are close to it in profile and flavor (that can 
be gotten)?
Best Regards,
Ken B
PS...Thanks again Ross.  I do appreciate the guidance!

2) From: homeroast
On Jan 19, 2008, at 7:24 AM, Ken B wrote:
<Snip>
Please do! I use a dryer hose out the window as well, and just got my  
thermocouple.
-
allon

3) From: homeroast
Hi Allon,
Here ya go:http://www.onlymysite.net/images/misc/thermocouple-3.jpghttp://www.onlymysite.net/images/misc/thermocouple-4.jpg">http://www.onlymysite.net/images/misc/thermocouple-1.jpghttp://www.onlymysite.net/images/misc/thermocouple-2.jpghttp://www.onlymysite.net/images/misc/thermocouple-3.jpghttp://www.onlymysite.net/images/misc/thermocouple-4.jpg
I hope they help.  Good luck!
Best Regards,
Ken B
Allon Stern wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: homeroast
Oh, and to the list...yes, I know!  The next purchase will be a real 
grinder! ;-) (before I get notes about my Mr Coffee burr grinder in 
photo 4.) :-)  But it was free, so I couldn't beat the price.
Best Regards,
Ken B
Allon Stern wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: homeroast
On Jan 19, 2008, at 5:53 PM, Ken B  wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
I was unable to make it fit; did you remove the blue tubing on the  
probe first?
-
allon

6) From: homeroast
Hi Allon, I assume you mean through the fine mesh top?  It was the only 
hole that had any problem getting the probe through.
It is tight, but it fit on mine.  I just had to carefully massage (read 
push hard) it to get it through, staying close to the hole so the wire 
does not bend.
I WISH had removed the blue tubing.  It would have saved some coffee. 
:-)  I suggest that if the blue tubing slides off, you do so.  that will 
also allow the wire to go through easier I think.
Good luck,
Ken B
Allon Stern wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: homeroast
I simply ran mine across the top of the roast chamber, down through one
of the holes in the chamber, and then back up to where it sits in the
bean mass.  Doesn't seem to hurt the rubber seal in the chaff
chamber/top.
rod

8) From: homeroast
------=_Part_13880_27792497.1200890119225
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Disposition: inline
You keep excellent records, Ken. You also mentioned:
"question to the list.  i really enjoyed the El Salador Siberia.
Any thoughts on coffees that are close to it in profile and flavor (that ca=
n
be gotten)?"
If you lose that infernal striated ducting, or connect the far end of it to
an exhaust fan and space it a few inches above the iRoast, your roaster
won't have its exhaust flow blocked by the miserable ducting.
Then you'll see how well the iRoast can really do. Then just change the
roast on your El Salador Siberia and cup the differences. It will definitel=
y
roast differently, in spite of contrary comments.
The striated duct is almost as bad as a wad of paper jammed in the pipe.
See for yourself-
a.) -set your empty iRoast up and tip it to blow in your face.
b.) -install the duct in the picture, and aim the other end at your face.
Compare the flow in a.) and b.)
The laminar flow in the duct, no matter what size (bigger *is* better) is
highly turbulent and introduces a lot of back pressure. It takes horsepower
to create the turbulent flow.
The manufacture of that junk should be prohibited- friends don't let friend=
s
use it. Flue pipe would be far better. Even there, you could improve it.
Wherever you need a 90° bend, use two 90° elbows, twisted so that each =
one
forms a 45. When they're hooked together, it forms a 90 with a larger radiu=
s
of curvature = less turbulence, more flow.
Right angles are good for Pythagoras, no good for fluid flow.
Cheers, Mabuhay, tung hô -RayO, aka Opa!
On Jan 19, 2008 5:24 AM, Ken B  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
------=_Part_13880_27792497.1200890119225
Content-Type: text/html; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Disposition: inline
You keep excellent records, Ken. You also mentioned: 
"question=
 to the list.  i really enjoyed the El Salador Siberia.  
=
Any thoughts on coffees that are close to it in profile and flavor (that ca=
n be gotten)?"
If you lose that infernal striated ducting, or connect the far end =
of it to an exhaust fan and space it a few inches above the iRoast, your ro=
aster won't have its exhaust flow blocked by the miserable ducting.
Then you'll see how well the iRoast can really do. Then just ch=
ange the roast on your El Salador Siberia and cup the differences. It will =
definitely roast differently, in spite of contrary comments. 
The st=
riated duct is almost as bad as a wad of paper jammed in the pipe.
See for yourself- 
a.) -set your empty iRoast up and tip it to b=
low in your face. 
b.) -install the duct in the picture, and aim the oth=
er end at your face.
Compare the flow in a.) and b.) 
The lam=
inar flow in the duct, no matter what size (bigger 
is better) is highly turbulent and introduces a lot of back pressure=
. It takes horsepower to create the turbulent flow.
The manufacture =
of that junk should be prohibited- friends don't let friends use it. Fl=
ue pipe would be far better. Even there, you could improve it. 
Wherever you need a 90° bend, use two 90° elbows, twisted so th=
at each one forms a 45. When they're hooked together, it forms a 90 wit=
h a larger radius of curvature = less turbulence, more flow.
Right=
 angles are good for Pythagoras, no good for fluid flow.
Cheers, Mabuhay, tung hô -RayO, aka Opa!
On Jan 19, 2008 5:24 AM, Ken B <coffee> wrote:
I received the thermometer (and some more coffee...my stash is growing)
=
from SM yesterday, and got excited and wished to try the i-Roast 2 with
=
the thermometer to see if I could see a difference.  Wow...the
diff=
erence is night and day!  Special thanks to Ross for the off-list
help, and strong suggestion to buy a thermometer. :-)
Here are s=
ome random observations:
Caveat:
1) when using the thermometer fo=
r the first time, you might wish to try
to remove the blue thing at the =
tip of the thermocouple.  My first batch
with the new thermocouple had blue plastic on about 30% of the beans.The second batch showed no further sign of melting from the thing, but I<=
br>had scrapped a lot of it off by then. And honestly, this may be because
on the first batch I did not take into account the expansion of the bea=
n
and  the probe was too deep in the coffee.  As the beans exp=
anded, they
pretty much covered the blue plastic thing.  On the sec=
ond roast, I did
take the bean expansion into account and seated the thermocouple just t=
o
the top of the green beans.  This seemed to work perfectly. So, d=
on't
use your "good stuff" for the first roast.
2) =
To mount the thermocouple,  I ran it through an existing hole in the
fine chaff screen top of the i-Roast, then through one of the holes tha=
t
hold on the rubber o-ring to the piece of the top that fits the roast<=
br>chamber.  This allows me to still mount the vent hood...e.g. the dr=
yer
hose to run out the window.  If any of you are interested in pictu=
res of
this, let me know and I will upload them to where you can see the=
m.
3) I am by no means an experienced home-roaster with the knowledg=
e and
information many of the folks on this list have. I have roasted maybe 5=
0
batches of beans, and many of those roasts were, to me, undrinkable. &=
nbsp;I
now understand why. :-)  I offer this information for other =
newbies lost
in the wealth of information, as a way to pay back for all the help Iwas offered.  YMMV!
So, it turns out I WAS hearing 1st and se=
cond crack after all...I just
did not know it.  With the thermocoup=
le attached, and know what the bean
mass temperature was, I paid particular attention to the sounds at
c=
ertain key temperatures.  I distinctly heard first and second crack on=
these two test roasts, so I now have my "reference" sample. :=
-)
The profile I used on these roasts was: 350-2 min, 370-2 min, 390-2=
 min,
405-2 min, 450-4 min. Coffee was the India Mallali Estate tree-dri=
ed.
(one of my favorite coffees from SM)
I let the roast begin, a=
nd waited two and one half minutes, then logged
the internal vs. external temperature.  That data looks like this:=
12 minute total roast time:
Time remaining:    Int=
ernal (i-Roast) temp:    External (thermocouple) temp:
9:30 &n=
bsp; 356   323
9:00   361   353
8:30   367   360
8:00   370   370
7:30  =
 376   381
7:00   380   383
6:30   378   391=
-> 1st crack at 6:08
6:00   376   406 -> first crack=
 fully moving
5:30   392   412
5:00   408   419
4:30   408   431
-> 2nd crack at 4:04
4:00   450 &n=
bsp; 452
3:45 active (rolling?) second crack.
3:35 hit cool to end th=
is roast
The result is a very nice roast...the best I have gotten fr=
om the
i-Roast.  The reason the other roasts were not so good was b=
ecause I was
stopping them way early I think, or charring them. I am sitting herehttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change yo=
ur personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to <=
a href="http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings"target=
="_blank">">http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
-- "When the theme hits the bas= s, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC Para= mount) WurliTzer- 1976 ------=_Part_13880_27792497.1200890119225--

9) From: homeroast
Good morning Raymond,
In a perfect world, I would have a nice roaster setup with it's own 
exhaust system, etc.  However, I roast in my kitchen, and the range vent 
hood is not vented to the outside.  I tried to roast without venting, 
and running around the house trying to turn off the smoke alarms is less 
desirable than blackflow on the roaster. While I agree it is not the 
optimum setup, it is what it is until I can do a more proper 
installation.  If I go the route of installing a special exhaust system, 
I will also install a larger roaster. :-)
As to my question re: the El Salvador Siberia, I was asking if anyone 
knew of a different coffee that exhibited the same general character and 
flavor.  I tried the El Salvador Yellow Bourbon, but found it to be 
somewhat close to the Siberia, but lacking something. (I am new to 
defining coffee, so it is somewhat vague)  I did not like it as much as 
the Siberia, and was trying to use the expertise here to help me to 
understand why, and to point me to coffees that might be more similar.  
I will take better notes next time, so I can ask more specific 
questions. ;-)
Anyway, thanks for the input.  I will build a setup one day to include 
properly vented roasting areas.  Until then, I use what I have and try 
to do the best I can with it.
Best Regards,
Ken B
raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest