HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Preheat temp? (6 msgs / 172 lines)
1) From: lesliejcarpenter
Hi All,
My homemade rotisserie roaster with a drum, obviously doesn't have any heat pre-settings.? Can I please ask what temp you preheat your roasters to prior to loading the beans?? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you,
Leslie
Meet the new AOL.ca. Free radio, music, videos, news & entertainment ? with a Canadian perspective.

2) From: Tom Ulmer
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
Some folks do not preheat. I take the drum temperature to about 425F =
slowly
before loading.
 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of
lesliejcarpenter
Sent: Thursday, January 24, 2008 4:51 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Preheat temp?
 
Hi All,
My homemade rotisserie roaster with a drum, obviously doesn't have any =
heat
pre-settings.  Can I please ask what temp you preheat your roasters to =
prior
to loading the beans?  Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you,
Leslie  
  Meet the new AOL.ca. Free radio, music, videos, =
news &
entertainment  with a Canadian perspective.

3) From: Ken Mary
I also use a modified rotisserie roaster. Preheats do nothing for me except
make me use gloves to insert the drum. My temperature logs comparing preheat
and no preheat converge within a few minutes at less than 100C so nothing is
gained. I start all of my roasts with a cold oven and drum.
Now if you had a massive drum capable of storing heat then you must preheat
to get a reasonably short roast time to avoid baking the beans. But massive
drums have another problem, they will hold their temperature for a long
time, not permitting any "quick turns" in the roast profile.
I have two small drums that were initially made several years ago as a proof
of concept but were so successful that I still use them today. The
nonperforated sheet metal drum has an internal volume of 54 cubic inches
with a maximum bean load of 105 grams. The drum weighs only 60 grams, much
less than the weight of beans. The screen mesh drum is 59 cubic inches with
a normal bean load of 115 grams, it weighs 58 grams. So, at least in my
equipment, the beans are the major heat sink, not counting the mass of the
oven.
BTW you can diminish the heat sink effect of the oven by lining it
(including the glass door) with aluminum foil.
--
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<Snip>
<Snip>

4) From: RK
I preheat my drum (RK 4lb Drum) to 500 degrees for about 10 min.
This is when I first start a roasting session. then on additional batches I
just place the drum back in the grill and turn the burner on high while the
last batch is cooling, then set it at these temps for various load sizes
450 for 1 lb   470 for 2 lb  490 for 3 lb and 510 for 4lbs
I lower the temps 20 to 30 degrees after first crack just get going and then
raise it 5 degrees per min. until 2nd crack Just as 2nd starts I cut the
heat to low and adjust as needed to hit the below target
I shoot for 4 to 6 min from the start of first to the desired finish and
adjust the heat as need to achieve this target.
RK

5) From: lesliejcarpenter
Hi Ken,
Thank you very much for the tips.? My drum holds up to 5lbs, but I only usually place 3lbs when I am roasting. It does take several mins to get above 400F.? What temps did you preheat to when you were doing that?
Thank you,
Leslie
---- Original Message ----
From: Ken Mary 
To: homeroast
Sent: Fri, 25 Jan 2008 4:55 am
Subject: Re: +Preheat temp?
I also use a modified rotisserie roaster. Preheats do nothing for me except
make me use gloves to insert the drum. My temperature logs comparing preheat
and no preheat converge within a few minutes at less than 100C so nothing is
gained. I start all of my roasts with a cold oven and drum.
Now if you had a massive drum capable of storing heat then you must preheat
to get a reasonably short roast time to avoid baking the beans. But massive
drums have another problem, they will hold their temperature for a long
time, not permitting any "quick turns" in the roast profile.
I have two small drums that were initially made several years ago as a proof
of concept but were so successful that I still use them today. The
nonperforated sheet metal drum has an internal volume of 54 cubic inches
with a maximum bean load of 105 grams. The drum weighs only 60 grams, much
less than the weight of beans. The screen mesh drum is 59 cubic inches with
a normal bean load of 115 grams, it weighs 58 grams. So, at least in my
equipment, the beans are the major heat sink, not counting the mass of the
oven.
BTW you can diminish the heat sink effect of the oven by lining it
(including the glass door) with aluminum foil.
--
----------
<Snip>
<Snip>Meet the new AOL.ca. Free radio, music, videos, news & entertainment ? with a Canadian perspective.

6) From: C. Herlihy
RK  wrote:
  I never pre heat my drum (RK 6lb.) in the grill, but instead I put it on top of the grill lid while the grill is heating up. It's especially important that I warm the drum during cold weather, and even more so because I'm only roasting 5 lb. batches. There's a very different dynamic with the big batches, in that I start the roast with a hot grill, and high gas setting, and lower the gas setting little by little throughout the roast as the beans get hotter. When first crack starts I lower the gas fairly dramatically for a minute, then ease it back up, but never to pre first crack level. In the summer I start with a less hot grill, and use lower gas settings throughout the roast, compared to winter roasting, and end up with the same roast times, but get fewer roasts per tank of gas.
  Charlie
  
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