HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Question: Amount of coffee for French Press (15 msgs / 462 lines)
1) From: Ken B
Hi folks,
I read on the list of folks using 30-40 grams of coffee in their French 
Press. Few say how large their presses are, and I wonder if I am using 
too much coffee.  I don't think so, but thought I would ask to be sure.
I have the large Bodum which holds a bit over 48 oz to get to the top 
line (about 50 oz).  I use 70 grams of coffee per pot, 200 degree water, 
1 minute wait, stir, 3.5 minutes and plunge to 4 minutes (30 sec 
plunge), pour my first cup, and transfer the rest to a thermal carafe.  
This seems to work, because the coffee sure tastes good, but I am always 
interested in refining things I can.  Does this sound like a rational 
ratio of coffee to water and time?
Thanks for any input.
Best Regards,
Ken B
Oh, and I have done 6 more batches of the Sulawesi Enrekang Mt Alla.  
None of these turned out as good as the first roast, though they are all 
very close and very good.  In all of the subsequent roasts, the molasses 
was toned down a bit from the original.  To be sure it was not just my 
taste buds that day, I did go back and make the last of the 1st batch, 
and indeed it is more complex, with more pronounced molasses.  When I 
graph the other roasts against the original, it would appear they ramp 
about 3-6 degrees cooler for the first 4-5 minutes.  This MAY be because 
I did not have my scale the first roast, and I may have gotten a bit 
more than the 150 grams I am roasting now.  I am going to try a roast 
with 170 grams and see if it makes a difference.  I will let you know 
the results.

2) From: Brian Kamnetz
Hi Ken,
People on the list generally use between 1 gram and 2 grams of coffee
per ounce of water for most extraction methods other than espresso.
Some use more than that for Aeropress.
Most people will say that you should experiment using more or less
coffee until you get a concentration that tastes best for you. You
might also want to experiment with grind. Among people on this list
there is quite a range of preferences for grind, from quite fine to
quite coarse. Generally, steeping time increases as the grind gets
more coarse.
I'm sure others will reply, but thought I'd offer my $.02.
Brian
On Jan 26, 2008 6:25 PM, Ken B  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Brett Mason
I have the large Bodum presspot ...
I start with 80g of roasted beans, Zass ground at the most coarse setting.
Many will tell you I waste beans.
I will tell you they waste coffee - life is too short to drink a mediocre
cup!
OK, well that's how I typically do it!
Happy quaffing,
Brett
On Jan 26, 2008 5:31 PM, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

4) From: Jason Brooks
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Brett Mason wrote:
| I have the large Bodum presspot ...
|
| I start with 80g of roasted beans, Zass ground at the most coarse setting.
|
| Many will tell you I waste beans.
|
| I will tell you they waste coffee - life is too short to drink a
| mediocre cup!
|
| OK, well that's how I typically do it!
|
| Happy quaffing,
| Brett
|
| On Jan 26, 2008 5:31 PM, Brian Kamnetz > wrote:
|
|     Hi Ken,
|
|     People on the list generally use between 1 gram and 2 grams of coffee
|     per ounce of water for most extraction methods other than espresso.
|     Some use more than that for Aeropress.
|
|     Most people will say that you should experiment using more or less
|     coffee until you get a concentration that tastes best for you. You
|     might also want to experiment with grind. Among people on this list
|     there is quite a range of preferences for grind, from quite fine to
|     quite coarse. Generally, steeping time increases as the grind gets
|     more coarse.
|
|     I'm sure others will reply, but thought I'd offer my $.02.
|
|     Brian
|
|
|     On Jan 26, 2008 6:25 PM, Ken B > wrote:
|      > Hi folks,
|      >
|      > I read on the list of folks using 30-40 grams of coffee in their
|     French
|      > Press. Few say how large their presses are, and I wonder if I am
|     using
|      > too much coffee.  I don't think so, but thought I would ask to be
|     sure.
|      >
|      > I have the large Bodum which holds a bit over 48 oz to get to
the top
|      > line (about 50 oz).  I use 70 grams of coffee per pot, 200 degree
|     water,
|      > 1 minute wait, stir, 3.5 minutes and plunge to 4 minutes (30 sec
|      > plunge), pour my first cup, and transfer the rest to a thermal
|     carafe.
|      > This seems to work, because the coffee sure tastes good, but I am
|     always
|      > interested in refining things I can.  Does this sound like a
rational
|      > ratio of coffee to water and time?
|      >
|      > Thanks for any input.
|      >
|      > Best Regards,
|      > Ken B
|
|     homeroast mailing list
|    http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast|     To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
|     unsvbscribes) go to
|    http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings|
|
|
|
| --
| Cheers,
| Brett
|
|http://homeroast.freeservers.comWhat size of the large - 8 or 12 tasse?
- --
Jason Brooks
jbrookshttp://javajeb.wordpress.com- -------------------------------
Enjoying good coffee in the Heart of Virginia
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5) From: Ken B
12 tasse.
Ken B
<Snip>

6) From: Demian Ebert
I use about 50 gm of coffee for about 48 oz of water. I grind pretty fine,
at 16 above zero on my Rocky and steeped for 2:33. Sometimes I'll use a
smidgen more coffee, but the 50 gm amount is the typical.
As long as you like the results, it doesn't really matter.
Demian

7) From: Bill
2:33???  I like the specifics of that.  Not 2:32, not 2:34, dangit!  My
coffee steeps for 2 minutes, 33 seconds!!  That's what I call PASSION!!!
anyway, I use a 16 oz press, 20 g coffee, ground about "drip"... I steep for
2 minutes.  I boil 1 L water, preheat, then grind, dump preheat into coffee
cup, dump grinds, pour water in (about 196 F)...
my 2 cents.
Bill
On Jan 26, 2008 5:08 PM, Demian Ebert  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: miKe mcKoffee
Not again Brett. 80g for a 48oz presspot comes out to roughly my rule of
thumb 8g per 5oz water. But hah I can disagree! I use finer grind and 3
minute infusion. Drip grind on Bunn at the Kafe to be precise. FWIW after
presspot plunge then pour through Swissgold either into waiting cup or
airpot for 45min max hold. Oh, 208f water. 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffeehttp://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://www.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
	Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2008 3:37 PM
	To: homeroast
	Subject: Re: +Question: Amount of coffee for French Press
	
	I have the large Bodum presspot ...
	
	I start with 80g of roasted beans, Zass ground at the most coarse
setting.
	
	Many will tell you I waste beans.
	
	I will tell you they waste coffee - life is too short to drink a
mediocre cup!
	
	OK, well that's how I typically do it!
	
	Happy quaffing,
	Brett
	
	On Jan 26, 2008 5:31 PM, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
	
		Hi Ken,
		
		People on the list generally use between 1 gram and 2 grams
of coffee
		per ounce of water for most extraction methods other than
espresso.
		Some use more than that for Aeropress.
		
		Most people will say that you should experiment using more
or less
		coffee until you get a concentration that tastes best for
you. You
		might also want to experiment with grind. Among people on
this list
		there is quite a range of preferences for grind, from quite
fine to
		quite coarse. Generally, steeping time increases as the
grind gets
		more coarse.
		
		I'm sure others will reply, but thought I'd offer my $.02.
		
		Brian
		
		On Jan 26, 2008 6:25 PM, Ken B 
wrote:
		> Hi folks,
		>
		> I read on the list of folks using 30-40 grams of coffee in
their French
		> Press. Few say how large their presses are, and I wonder
if I am using
		> too much coffee.  I don't think so, but thought I would
ask to be sure.
		>
		> I have the large Bodum which holds a bit over 48 oz to get
to the top
		> line (about 50 oz).  I use 70 grams of coffee per pot, 200
degree water,
		> 1 minute wait, stir, 3.5 minutes and plunge to 4 minutes
(30 sec
		> plunge), pour my first cup, and transfer the rest to a
thermal carafe.
		> This seems to work, because the coffee sure tastes good,
but I am always
		> interested in refining things I can.  Does this sound like
a rational
		> ratio of coffee to water and time?
		>
		> Thanks for any input.
		>
		> Best Regards,
		> Ken B

9) From: Ken B
Thanks to all for the responses.  Since I do not grind as course as most 
of you and not as fine as some of you (I use a medium drip grind) the 70 
grams seems to work fairly well.  However, I do think tomorrow I will 
try 80, and the day after I will try 60 with a finer grind, just to be 
sure.  I do not mind sediment in my cup.  I tend to munch on fresh 
roasted beans as they cool anyway.  As long as the sediment tastes good, 
I have no problem with it.  It becomes the solid part of my breakfast. :-)
Best Regards,
Ken B
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: raymanowen
I have the self same *$ Bodum press.
I use 65g of coffee, 1L of boiling (201°F) water. Hold the black plastic =
top
cover with one hand and wobble the beaker with the other to knock down the
bloom.
After a minute, I stick it in the microwave for a few seconds until it
starts to foam up, to maintain brewing temperature, and repeat the wobbling
exercise.
No, the metal parts don't melt, any more than your car or radio antenna
melts when you drive by a 50kw radio transmitter. It takes resistivity (or
resistance) to absorb energy and generate heat. The metal, with nearly zero
on both counts, doesn't, while the water solution does, and gets hot.
The wavelength is about 4 inches, so at the worst the metal upsets the
standing wave pattern. But it's nowhere near as bad as popping corn in a
microwave oven. The standing waves are intense within the cabinet because
the popcorn doesn't absorb much power because of its tiny physical size.
Rotate it or small volumes get hundreds of watts of RF power and burn.
BTW- the intense standing waves are the probable reason that it's risky to
boil water in certain sized containers in a microwave. When it starts to
boil, small volumes can be far above the boiling point. As the heat conduct=
s
away from the hot spot, the main volume, that was nearly boiling, becomes
superheated and can all start to boil at once. 'Tain't pertty if you're
holding the vessel.
Aloe Vera gel time- that's why we always keep a couple of jars of it in the
fridge.
Cheers, Mabuhay, tiêng hoan hô, enjoy -RayO, aka Opa!
On Jan 26, 2008 4:25 PM, Ken B  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

11) From: Brett Mason
Mike Rocks!
 ... Brett
On Jan 26, 2008 9:12 PM, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

12) From: Kris McN
Ken,
Phew!  I thought I was going to have to say, "I'm with Brett on this one",
but instead I get to say, I'm with Mike (and you, at least on quantity).  I
use 72g in my 48oz press pot.  I grind a bit finer and press at ~3:15.  I
messed around with a coarser grind and longer extraction, but found anything
much longer and it starts to get a little bitter.  Short and sweet is
better, for me at least.
Kris McN

13) From: Brett Mason
If long and bitter, better check out your grinder - yeah, I know you have a
Maseratti - but bitter?
Glad you agree though!
Cheers,
Brett
On Jan 27, 2008 12:26 AM, Kris McN  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

14) From: Kris McN
Brett,
At longer than 3:15 it *starts* to get a little bitter.  I still find it
drinkable, just not ideal, up to about 4:15.  Anything longer and it's not
my cuppa (I could stretch those times with a coarser grind but I don't find
any benefit in the flavor, on the contrary...).  It may be my grinder.  I
don't have one of the super-best-top-dogs; a KitchenAid Pro Line I got back
when I was still doing drip only with local roaster beans.  I don't walk on
the dark side so I haven't seen fit to save up my ducats and buy something
else.  I do keep it clean and have replaced the burrs.  I'm pleased with the
results for FP, AP, moka pot, WonderClown 9000, and (new this Christmas)
KMB.
Best,
Kris McN

15) From: Demian Ebert
2:33 comes from being too lazy to move my hand down to the zero and make it
2:30. It's not really precision or passion, but it is pretty funny.
Demian
On Jan 26, 2008 4:26 PM, Bill  wrote:
<Snip>


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