HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Plastic vs. Cloth (11 msgs / 215 lines)
1) From: BeanMeUp
And now for my first question:
Is there any benefit to storing raw beans in cloth bags instead of the  
plastic ZipLock bags from SM?
I purchased some cloth bags from SM a while ago, but the convenience  
of the plastic has kept me from using them.
I subscribe to the digest of this list, so please understand any delay  
in potential responses.
Thanks!
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2) From: Dean
In my opinion, no real advantage for indoor storage--in fact, if the 
humidity is low, the cotton bags may allow the beans to dry out a bit in 
storage as they are not sealed.  On the other hand in very cool and 
variable temperatures, the plastic may develop condensation inside that 
could lead to spoilage.
So if you like the idea of natural fibers, or if you want to display 
your stash, use the cotton bags.  If you plan on consuming your stash 
quickly, plastic is great, and it looks fine in a drawer or a storage bin.
Roasting (and wishing the snowplow would finally get here) in da weeds
Dean
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3) From: Jeff
After I got my first order I emailed SM with the same question. SM said 
plastic is OK for a couple of months, but after that it should be stored 
in cloth. I didn't ask why, and they didn't say.
BeanMeUp wrote:
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4) From: Brett Mason
Plastic:  Too much moisture - over time - gets moldy...
Cloth:  bags allow the storage room environment to permeate the beans - now
you can control how they are maintained in storage...
Brett
On Mon, Feb 18, 2008 at 7:21 PM, Jeff  wrote:
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Cheers,
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5) From: Rich
Search the SM site for storage.  The subject is covered as to why the 
bans should be allowed to breathe.
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6) From: Brett Mason
Here's the Sweet Marias link for green coffee storage:http://www.sweetmarias.com/greenstorage.htmlBrett
On Mon, Feb 18, 2008 at 7:27 PM, Rich  wrote:
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7) From: Paul Helbert
http://www.sweetmarias.com/greenstorage.htmlhttp://www.sweetmarias.com/green.coffee.issues.html
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8) From: Jeff Oien
I've kept beans in plastic for over two years and have never seen them 
get moldy. I would think I would rather keep the moisture in the bean 
than let them dry out but what do I know.
JeffO
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9) From: raymanowen
My Bolivia Organic Cenaproc "peaberry", in plastic on my pantry shelf since
April '05, has been a Winner every time I roasted it, either 400g at a time
in the HG/ BM, or sample roasts in the Fresh Roast. Monday was the last and
still Yum-O!
The same goes for every other bean I've ever gotten. It finally hit me-
about 45 pounds of beans are hiding in boxes we put in a safe place. Unless
the beans are hermetically sealed, their humidity level will rise and fall
slowly with the atmospheric relative humidity.
Closed plastic containers, such as the ones used for shipping by SM, tend to
keep humidity constant with the minor air exchanges due to barometric
changes. Vacuum removes gas molecules- O2, H2O, etc. (H2O molecules exist as
an invisible gas at normal temperature and pressure)
Clouds become visible in the low temperature gradients of the atmosphere.
Pump air molecules out of any container, and you are removing water
molecules, too. All of the gas molecules will redistribute in the volume to
re-achieve a balanced concentration.
Show of Hands- has Anyone had real, not imaginary, moisture condensation
using closed plastic or glass containers at room temperature? Please raise
your hand. I'll wait.
Since it is an impossibility unless the beans were packaged on a high
humidity day and the temperature of the container dropped below the
condensing temperature before the beans reabsorbed the moisture, I'm
prepared to wait until the Place of Fabled Heat freezes over to watch any
hands go up.
If the phenomenon is a real problem, many hands will go up- not just one.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
This would make a good Gong show episode- Busted!
On Feb 18, 2008 9:05 PM, Jeff Oien  wrote:
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10) From: Floyd Lozano
Every bag I have received from Sweet Maria's has tiny little holes
poked in it - not many, but some.  I believe there's a reason for
this, as it appears deliberate.  Possibly to prevent them exploding in
transit to varying elevations (like in planes, or to mountains) or
possibly to prevent molding, I don't know.  But they are there, and
over time, I do expect their moisture content changes, certainly not
so much as if left in open containers, but more than if vac sealed.
-F
On Thu, Feb 21, 2008 at 8:59 PM,   wrote:
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11) From: George Miller
I used to use either cloth, plastic bags beans come in and zip lock bags.
All of these proved too much trouble to use with my 100 lb plus stash of
caffinated beans and 15 or so decaf beans.
So this is the way I store greens now.   Since I love biscotti and have
probably 20 or more containers empty that will hold about 7 lbs each.   When
the biscotti containers are low enough to put in a penny jar, that is where
it goes.  When they are down to about the last pound, they go into a glass
bread loaf pan that comes with a top.  All containers are put on shelves
against my cellar wall.  I keep the containers sealed tight and beans have
lasted years with no problems at all in my varying heat and humidity
basement.  After I roast coffee I will either store it in a penny candy jar
for larger roast batches ( a single batch or multiple up to about 2 lbs or
so (Gene Cafe or Bravi) with the tops slightly cracked for the first day to
help the beans degas a bit, after that I snug the tops down.  Small batches
(from a Zach machine) goes into a small (about 4 oz) food container with
it's plastic type top.  Yes, it cost a small mint to get all of the jars,
but the biscotti at Sams Club and the other glass ware from WalMart help
save some cash.  I now have a setup that will easily hold over 200 lbs if
neccessary.  If not enough, I can still eat biscotti and stop at WalMart for
more glassware.
GeorgeM
On Fri, Feb 22, 2008 at 12:16 PM, Floyd Lozano  wrote:
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