HomeRoast Digest


Topic: newbie questions about SweetMarias coffee reviews (33 msgs / 878 lines)
1) From: bv welch
I'm confused about the context in which the coffee reviews on the web site
are given.
My guess is, that they have roasted the coffee in-house, allowed it to rest
for some number of days, and then tasted the coffee and written the review.
Is this close to being correct?
A somewhat related question--  when Tom makes these trips to the country of
origin, and does the "cuppings", does he oversee the roasting and grinding?
And how long does the coffee "rest" before cupping?
Thank you,
Bill
ps: Brett go easy on me.  A person has to start somewhere...
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2) From: J.W.Bullfrog
Tom cups the coffee when they arrive at the shop for both acceptance (he can
& does reject batches) and the review data.
Basically it is cupped withing a few hours (normally less) of the roast. It
is also cupped at a very light roast since that magnifies defects.
Its counter intuitive to the roast and rest mentality of the list.
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 10:22 AM, bv welch  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion.
I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate.
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
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3) From: Allon Stern
On Feb 29, 2008, at 11:22 AM, bv welch wrote:
<Snip>http://www.sweetmarias.com/cupping.htmlI don't believe they rest coffee when cupping. Cupping coffee is not  
the same as preparing coffee for drinking - it is a way of  
consistently preparing coffee in such a way that the flavors can be  
evaluated, and an experienced cupper will be able to judge the  
qualities and defects.
-
allon
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4) From: bv welch
Thank you for your reply.  It was exactly what I was looking for -- not
information about cupping in general, but insight into how Tom does it, and
especially how to relate his review notes for the coffees I have purchased
from him.
But I'll admit I am surprised that he can write such details about the
coffee, without letting it rest.
In my cup, I find the taste of just-roasted coffee so bizarre, I can't
imagine how it will taste after a few days rest.  And this is a problem,
because I if/when I do wind up with a good cup of coffee, I may not remember
exactly how to duplicate it for the next roast.
Bill
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 10:31 AM, J. W. Bullfrog 
wrote:
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5) From: Kevin
Bill,
What is your roasting method?  I'm sure people on the list will provide
profiles for whichever roasting method you employ.  The profiles will be a
good starting point.
Kevin
On 2/29/08, bv welch  wrote:
<Snip>
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My home coffee roasting blog:http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/Kevin
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6) From: Floyd Lozano
well here's my guess - Tom does the cupping to identify the lots most
likely to be offerings.  If at the location, it's based on the roast
and cup right then and there.  At home, he has the luxury of roasting
the given samples to different levels of roast and rest.  You will in
fact see in his cupping log the different lots roasted to several
levels in some cases and notes / scores for that level.  Either way,
he gets lot samples to do this with in most cases so he can evaluate
whether or not to bring down several bags of the stuff.  He also has
to cup the shipped coffee to determine if the lot was damaged during
procesing / shipment / storage and can reject the lots, depending on
his relationship with the source.  Lastly, the tremendous experience
he's built over the years lets him better judge the likely best target
roast for a bean type and origin and that makes it a *little* less
work to evaluate the stuff.  The final reviews he writes are the
result of these post arrival roasts and evaluations, telling us what
the coffee tastes like at a given roast level and suggesting a best
approach.  So anyway, amazingly hard if you ask me, I'm glad there is
someone out there to do it for me!  It's all i can do to get my day to
day coffee roasted right =)  Here's hoping Tom never gets a cold!
-F
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 11:57 AM, bv welch  wrote:
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7) From: Paul Helbert
Exactly! That is why it is so important to make notes as you go along.
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 11:57 AM, bv welch  wrote:
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8) From: J.W.Bullfrog
Well, he's a 'supertaster', and probably cups everyday.
aka; practice, practice, practice.
After so many years I just calibrate what I like (taste) to how he describes
it. I even ocassionally taste waht he describes :)
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 10:57 AM, bv welch  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion.
I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate.
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
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9) From: Paul Helbert
Surely Tom cups the coffees at different roast levels, not just the light
roast to evaluate for defects as mentioned above. My local commercial
roaster friend, Troy Lucas of Lucasroasting, LLC, pulls samples at thirty
second intervals while evaluating a new coffee and then he makes French
Press cups from each of them. Notice that Tom suggests degrees of roast for
the coffees he sells. He is doing something very similar.
"There is nothing- absolutely nothing-
half so much worth doing as simply
messing about in boats."
---Ratty to Mole in Kenneth Grahame's
  The Wind in the Willows
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10) From: Les
Cupping is work!  I have taken some cupping lessons.  I have spent a couple
of hours cupping with Tom once.  Tom set us up on his cupping table with 12
different coffees.  Each was treated as objectively as possible.  It is
tough to take such a subjective topic as "taste" and make it objective.  I
like to cup coffee, but it is far different than preparing for enjoyment.
One of my first cupping experiences was with Mike McKoffee and a group of
Kona coffees.  It was revealing to say the least!  I try to cup at least
once a month to keep my skills up.
Les
On 2/29/08, J. W. Bullfrog  wrote:
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11) From: J.W.Bullfrog
I think that he does that after the cupping, to recomend a degree of roast.
A cupping roast is lighter than most poeple would like.
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 2:22 PM, Paul Helbert 
wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion.
I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate.
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
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12) From: bv welch
Greetings,
Thanks for all of the responses.
The SweetMaria web site is great, and has lots of good info.  Maybe what I
am looking for is in there somewhere, and I'm just not finding it for some
reason.
If not, perhaps some of you experienced folk could provide this: a set of
reviews that complement Tom's, but are aimed at helping a newbie experience
the coffees in their best light.
In particular, it would be great to identify a "short list" of "newbie
coffees", hopefully from each major country of origin, with instructions:
1. budget roaster - popper, stovetop, whirly pop, not sure?
2. recommended rest period
3. blade grinder only
4. pour-over brew method
Just my two cents worth,
Bill
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13) From: Brett Mason
Bill - why not order a sampler pack.  SM tries to cover many regions and
varieties in each sampler.  All the beans are top notch, and each one
excels.  Tom doesn't carry any losers...  I find that I like some more than
others, but I do like them all.
Head to a thrift store and get a popper.  Spend - $3.
Get a metal collander too - and a wooden spoon.
You'll need a jar.
It's tough to explain how simple this process is.  You will try other things
too.  But it's a lot like marshmallows - sometime you have to take a bite of
the first one...
There are some other sites that can help you too:
www.homeroasters.org
www.home-barista.com
www.coffeegeek.com
Get in the water - it's nice
Brett
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 6:31 PM, bv welch  wrote:
<Snip>
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Cheers,
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14) From: Lynne
Brett beat me to the punch - just what I was going to suggest. In fact, I
may be
ordering a decaf one when my financial aid money comes in - birthday present
to
myself! (been noticing that the caffeine is making me a bit too more wired,
so I plan
to make a 1/2 decaf, 1/2 regular homeroast blend for myself..)
You can't go wrong with any of SM's beans. They are all incredible, IMO!
Lynne
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 7:46 PM, Brett Mason  wrote:
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15) From: Kevin
I echo Brett's advice above.  I've order a sample pack every now and then
and have never been disappointed.  Many a time the sample included a bean
that I wouldn't have ordered on my own that I really enjoyed.  It's a great
way to try new coffees and branch out.  That's what turned me on to Rwandan
coffees.  The Rwandan's Tom has offered in the past have had some unique,
esoteric flavor notes that really pulled me in.
KeViN
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16) From: miKe mcKoffee
Seems to me (and what I do) initial cuppings are primarily for defects and
rough comparison. Are they even worth considering. Light cupping roasts are
good for this. Then I do targeted "probable" roast levels of like varietal
contenders to further narrow selections. Then roasting for target of those
selected. Of course with Tom virtually any and all greens that pass his
finicky muster are selected to offer while I have to make often tough
limited choices between equally good but different of the same or similar
varietal! 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffeehttp://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://www.mcKonaKoffee.comURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
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17) From: Jim Gundlach
Bill,
       Home roasting the great coffees Tom sells is qualitatively a  
different experience than almost any other category of consumable  
products.  Coffee is an agricultural product and no two coffees are  
ever the same, and the same coffee is not the same from year to year.   
So the first thing to remember is that you have a constantly changing  
set of coffee experiences to choose from.  Second, not all newbies are  
alike in their tastes and experience does not move people toward the  
same set of taste preferences.  What you need to do is explore and  
look for the characteristics of coffees you tend to prefer.  One early  
dimension to look at is body versus brightness or acidity.  I prefer  
coffees with a lot of body and since the scoring system gives high  
points for acidity, I typically don't like the highest scoring  
coffees.  My recommendation is to get a sample pack and look at the  
descriptions of those you like the most and then look for coffees that  
have similar descriptions or profiles.  Also, beware of Les's  
recommendations, he will have you competing for the largest stash in  
no time.  Sweet Maria's offers many very good coffees it can get  
expensive trying all the good ones.  Be content with really liking the  
coffee you are drinking.
     On roasting equipment, I learned the most from wok roasting on a  
wood or gas flame stirring by hand.  It is quiet and you get to use  
all your senses to monitor the roast.  You can see, hear, and smell  
the beans as the heat transforms them.  Usually this has to be done  
outside because the smoke is too much for most home environments.  The  
heat gun/dog bowl approach is a close second.  Both are fairly  
inexpensive to get started with.
     I am a firm believer in getting a good grinder.  No matter what  
some say, I would say the consensus among those who have tried several  
grinders agree that getting a consistent ground coffee is important  
for any brewing method.  I also recommend ignoring the advice of  
someone who says they are satisfied with their cheap grinder and has  
not tried better ones. Go check the archive for grinder discussions.   
If you have inconsistent particle size some particles will be under  
extracted or some over extracted so you will never get to bring out  
the best flavors of any coffee.  The only consistent grind you can get  
with the blade grinder is Turkish powder so unless you have an ibrik,  
the first thing you should consider is a better grinder.  The most  
economical way I know to get a good grinder is to get a used  
Zassenhaus off eBay.  I recommend the knee model because it usually  
gives a more consistent grind.  I got a very good buy on one that was  
labeled Fassenhaus because the seller did not know what they had and  
could not read German script.  I also got a good buy on a "vaccum"  
pot.  Searches by people who know what they want tend to miss the  
mislabeled or misspelled when the do an eBay search.
     On rest periods, I think the home roaster should learn what  
resting does to the flavor of coffee.  Start by drinking fresh  
roasted, you will probably move to a three day rest for most coffees  
after a while.  Some lighter roasts may need as long as five days.
        I guess I have said enough.
       pecan jim
On Feb 29, 2008, at 6:31 PM, bv welch wrote:
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18) From: bv welch
Thank you all for your helpful suggestions.
What, with all the other new folks that have joined the list in the past
week, you may not recall my introduction and subsequent purchase of an 8 lb.
SweetMarias sampler.
To recap, I've tinkered with several "split" poppers-- With a boost on the
fan, and a triac or variac on the heat, and a TC, I can slow down a roast,
and pretty much follow a profile.  I've been experimenting, on and off,
since Thanksgiving of last year.  For most of that time, I was using some
greens that I bought from a local roaster.
I don't mind the learning curve-- its fun. But I do think that it ought to
be possible to experience great coffee, that you made yourself, with just
inexpensive equipment.  Even Sweetmaria's implies that a whirly blade and
pour-over brewing should result in a good experience:http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.electricmills.shtml#bodumCmillI'm looking for a knee grinder that is within my budget. But it could be a
catch22 situation-- unless and until I experience some "great coffee" soon,
my budget will remain modest.
Besides the whirly blade, I have a relatively inexpensive Capresso "burr"
grinder. Had I known, I'd have saved up more for a knee grinder.  I have a
french press also.
Have I made some drinkable coffee? Yes.   Better than what comes from a can
at the grocer? Yes.  But enough better to merit all the effort?  Not yet..
In my view, there ought to be a "newbie sampler", that has some freshly
roasted coffee and some matching greens.  I am aware of SweetMaria's weekly
roast, and I may just try that one week. But with shipping to Alabama, that
is an expensive way to learn.
Not giving up yet,
Bill
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 7:52 PM, Jim Gundlach 
wrote:
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19) From: Brett Mason
So you have started with a question on cupping and resting, and the reviews
on the SM site.  We have meandered to how to begin roasting, and what's easy
for a newbie.
I think all your questions are fair.  But they are amazingly hard to answer,
because this is a process that improves over time...
I used to be lousy at grilling a steak.  I am improving.  I usually hit it
great - but I didn't always.  And it wasn't because of the USDA Beef
website....
I used to be lousy at programming.  THEN I LEARNED THE SECRET...
Good Programming is a result of experience!
Experience is a result of bad programming!
How does this relate to roasting?  I would recommend you consider Jim's
guidance - roast outside, in a wok or skillet, over a flame.  Keep folding
and lifting the beans so you don't scorch them.  YEP, the flat side will
brown quicker, and it won't be even - until you approach the end of the
roast...  You need to learn the process, learn what first is, what second
is, and learn to gauge quantity, speed and heat...
I know several folks who gave up on home roasting.  It is a lot of work.  I
have had several sub-zero roasting sessions in the falling snow this winter,
and several winters prior.  And my beans are not always as dazzling as I had
hoped...
I have had incredible roasts.  They are like God Shots, only they are
incredible.  and then I can't hit it again.  But I try.  And then one day,
surprisingly, the Angels Sing, Heaven Opens Up, Doves fly around, and the
coffee turns out perfect....  As if I had anything to do with it....
Get a Zass....
Hang in there...
  Don't take it personal!
Brett
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 8:32 PM, bv welch  wrote:
<Snip>
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20) From: raymanowen
"with shipping to Alabama, that is an expensive way to learn."
The 12 pound flat rate shipping exists for coffee only, and more flat rate
news may be on the horizon. Ya' pays your money and studies hard! Besides,
you have friends in the homeroast hobby just a click away.
If you rented a "student dorm apartment" in Oakland for a semester or a
year, you could concentrate on your learning, not shipping...
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 7:32 PM, bv welch  wrote:
<Snip>
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21) From: bv welch
Brett,
Thanks for the good observations.  I can relate to your programming-- That's
been my "day job" for almost 30 yrs now. I'll go easier on the "newbie"
programmers that cross my path from now on. :-)
And your grilling a steak example is good too.
I'll hush for awhile, and do more roasting.  And look for a mentor that is
within reasonable driving distance and gasoline expense. :-)
But I can't resist a parting shot-- let me guess, to really enjoy that
wok-roasted wonder, I need a $500 grinder, right? :-)
Bill
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 8:48 PM, Brett Mason  wrote:
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22) From: Brett Mason
I would say the Zass I bought for $17.50 is every bit as good as my $300
Rocky, and both are so far superior to the whirley-blade in my office next
to my other Zass....
So, ummm, no....
But you should get a good grinder.
  And smack the new programmer - he needs to respect experience....
Brett
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 9:04 PM, bv welch  wrote:
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23) From: Brett Mason
My skillet was $5 at a thrift store,here's a picture....http://homeroast.freeservers.com/images/p1010006_250x187.jpgYou'll hear it from a lot of people - grinder is key to good coffee.
We used to do stereos in college - and there were people who spent a bunch
for speakers.  I never understood why...  One day a grad student told me
that all the other equipment is hindered by the speakers' ability to produce
sound....
Get a good grinder.
Don't spend a fortune.
  Smack that young programmer again - for good measure...
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24) From: raymanowen
And there's the solid state vs vacuum tube "sound" debate, and the triodes
vs ultra-linear fed back tetrodes and pentodes debacle.
Der alte Fortz smiles when people toss around musical terms that are
descriptions of distortion...
Didn't need to spend a few bucks on a good grinder. Why wouldn't I want
additional green coffee from SM instead?
Then I could curse my roasting, the beans, the water temperature and the
brewing device, and never be able to make progress on any coffee I brewed.
Nah- I dream of a grind consistency like the "Drive Time Crunch" I'd get
from throwing beans on the Boulder Turnpike in the morning.
Many Land Barges have 4 wheel drive and studded tires on all 4. It would be
like a big burr grinder. Don't need no stinkin' homogeneous grind.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 8:27 PM, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
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25) From: Vicki Smith
The only thing I would add is to remember that it's just coffee--not 
gold--so if you have to throw out a batch here and there as you are 
learning, it's not a tragedy. Over time your technique will improve and 
your palate will too. Relax and enjoy the ride.
You may never reach the point where what you roast at home is as good as 
the best craft roasted coffee that someone like Tom can create, but, 
with some practice, I guarantee that it will be far better than anything 
you can buy at the grocery store, or at (far too) many of the roasteries 
in most cities.
Vicki
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26) From: raymanowen
"...just coffee--" Vicki, Vicki, Vicki- you didn't really say that, did you?
I am enjoying some '05 Moki's Farm Kona that was roasted to FC+ + on 26 Feb
08. (My muscles that stop roasts early have atrophied, so it just touched
Second.) Blame it on the speedy Fresh Roast. Switching to Cool
intermittently to throttle the roast is more work and takes more
coordination than just waving a heat gun appropriately over the roasting
beans.
The Grand Canyon is just a hole in the ground with water stream added, if
this is just coffee. This was *The Day *to enjoy the sweet symphony of this
lovely product of the farmer's art and Tom's persistence.
I only got two pounds of the Kona originally, and since I was never
satisfied with my roasting abilities, I still have over a pound left,
because I don't subscribe to the Ultimate Error: "if you have to throw out a
batch here and there as you are learning, it's not a tragedy."
if you have to throw out a batch here and there as you are learning, it's
not a tragedy. if you have to throw out a batch here and there as you are
learning, it's not a tragedy. if you have to throw out a batch here and
there as you are learning, it's not a tragedy.
Maybe it's proved by repetition- I'm just a little short on paper right now.
"You may never reach the point where what you roast at home is as good as
the best craft roasted coffee that someone like Tom can create..."
Actually, Tom can create these excellent roasts repeatedly with a few hours'
work because he's a Master of the art. I had gotten two pounds of the L-A
blend. When I got serious about exercising the Capresso Lucks with a real
espresso blend, not just a balky Ethiopian or Central American, I read
"Vienna to French roast" for the Liquid Amber.
Wow! I didn't do too shabby with Tom's excellent blend. I wanted to make
sure the variety of beans all got done with First, and I prodded them just
into Second, to make sure they all got a piece of the action. "OK, they're
all going- Quit!" and I chickened out. Maybe I dumped them a little early
into my Grand Slam cooler - - just shy of a full Vienna roast.
With a Mason jar just over half full of L-A and using only 14g per double
shot, I thought it sure wasn't lacking anything in roast development, and
was set for almost a week of practice.
I ordered L-A that would be craft roasted on 5 Nov 07. I hoped I would have
a little of my roast left for an A-B comparison, but that requires planning
and restr-ain't. Not strong points with me.
Sure enough, the craft roasted beans had a little more sheen than mine fresh
out of the cooler. Hello! They've been in transit for a few days, so it was
almost a match with mine at 5 days when they're about gone.
Five pounds of L-A green, along with the rest of that order and my Carpeso
espresso thingy have yet to cross my field of vision, now that we've gotten
boxes more organized since moving in. What a Blivet.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
We will overcome...
On Sat, Mar 1, 2008 at 6:33 AM, Vicki Smith  wrote:
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27) From: Vicki Smith
There is a corollary to "If you have to throw out a batch or two as you 
are learning, it's not a tragedy."
And that would be: Don't do your practising on $16 a pound beans ;).
Seriously, in the past six weeks my mother in law died, my step dad had 
a stroke, and my mother had a heart attack--it really is only coffee.
vicki
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28) From:
I hope you find some solace in a cuppa and with friends and family
Joyce
---- Vicki Smith  wrote: 
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29) From: raymanowen
A.- "Don't do your practising on $16 a pound beans."
There is this to say about that: *Why Not?
*I know for sure where your attention would be- and if gabbing on the phone,
you're in the rong pew!
$16 a pound beans would surely accelerate the learning-
Could I incorporate as Hooked on Coffee?
B.- In regard to your loss, I offer my sincere sympathy and condolences.
Death is an enemy, as the Bible states at 1st Corinthians 15:26. Just know
that you're not alone in dealing with the machinations of this enemy.
Cheers and Agape -RayO, aka Opa!
On Sat, Mar 1, 2008 at 5:06 PM, Vicki Smith  wrote:
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30) From: Dave Kvindlog
On Sat, Mar 1, 2008 at 6:06 PM, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
So sorry to hear that, Vicki.  One of those tragedies is hard enough to
bear, let alone three.  Are you doing OK?
-- 
Dave Kvindlog
iHomeroast
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
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31) From: Brian Salwasser
Bill,
I know I'm jumping in way too late on this conversation, but I would like to
add my experience as a newbie roaster.
1.  Grind does matter.  I used a whirly blade for the first 6 months, and
was astonished at the difference of taste with the burr grinder I received
for Christmas this last year.
2.  Air poppers work okay, but you have no idea how much they've been used
when getting them at a thriftstore.  The first one I bought lasted a few
months, and the second one a few weeks before the heat element went out and
the beans struggled to get to first crack.  I took some advice from people
on the list and splurged on a Behmor.  I was hesitant about this decision,
but my wife was going to be out of town for a couple of weeks to Ethiopia
for work and I needed a new toy (My wife was very understanding.  She
actually brought me back an Ethiopian coffee roaster that cost roughly 60
cents [6 Birr]...I appreciate the gift very much, but am partial to the
Behmor).  To be perfectly honest, I don't regret the decision.  I've had it
for two weeks and I can taste and see the difference in the quality of roast
over an air popper.
So, I just wanted to say that I spent some months drinking home roasted
coffee that was roasted and brewed with very inexpensive tools.  The coffee
was immensely better than anything I could buy in a supermarket (and just a
lot of fun to create).  But, when I was able to make some upgrades I could
tell a difference in quality and was pleased that I had chosen to do so.
Just FYI.
All the best,
Brian
On Sat, Mar 1, 2008 at 8:52 PM, Dave Kvindlog  wrote:
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32) From: Vicki Smith
I'm OK. We have had a truly awful time that began in November when Ron 
lost his job. Fortunately, we have each other, faith, and good friends 
to help us through this.
I am very much enjoying good coffee and weather that is warm enough to 
roast it in without risking frost bite.
I do though remember this horrifying sense that I had to learn to coffee 
perfectly before taking the plunge and roasting at all. Maybe it's my 
age, or maybe it's the other happenings in my life over time, but my 
point was really to encourage people to go ahead and roast and learn 
from the experience (supplemented by what is available to read, of course).
I started with an IR2, and I very much remember looking at the packets 
of green beans and feeling a certain sense of dread, along with the 
excitement. It seemed so overwhelming. I also remember walking past my 
bread machine a few months later and thinking, I wonder if....
I then grabbed my car keys, bought a heat gun, and haven't looked back. 
At that time, no one was roasting with a bread machine/heat gun (or if 
they were, they weren't writing about it). It felt like a leap, and 
unlike when I first began to roast, there was nothing terrifying about 
it. I had learned that it was, after all, just coffee.
vicki
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33) From: Sandy Andina
My sympathies, Vicki--within the space of a year I lost my own mom (at  
85), my father-in-law had several fainting and angina spells that were  
diagnosed as heart failure, and my mother-in-law suffered a stroke  
(and eventually needed an amputation) in between those spells.  Mother- 
in-law (age 95) then died 13 months after my mother; and today my  
father-in-law (now 87) collapsed in church and is now in the ER at  
Long Island Jewish--still being evaluated, they won't give us any info  
over the phone, won't let patients talk over their phones and they  
confiscated his cellphone lest it jam the telemetry. My husband is  
frantically trying to get all his own patients seen so we can get a  
flight out from Chicago to NY and reserve a hotel room--I'm hoping the  
ER docs will extend him some professional courtesy that they denied a  
mere relative. Ever since Sep. 2005, I don't think I've slept more  
than two weekends in a row in my own bed, between touring for my music  
(the easy part) and ping-ponging between Chicago, S. Florida and  
Queens.  Those homeroasted beans and my portable brewing equipment  
make life in hotel and motel rooms much more bearable.
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
On Mar 2, 2008, at 7:49 AM, Vicki Smith wrote:
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