HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Table of colors to measure roast degree (12 msgs / 282 lines)
1) From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Cef=E9_Surpreme?=
Dear all,
I am looking for a possibility to measure the roast degree consistently.
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http://www.scacr.com/en/)I heard in industry this is done by
photospectrometers which are unaffordable for home roasting (about 6000$).
An other widely used alternative are table of colors with a spectrum of
roasted coffee colours.
Do you have any experience in using such tables of color? Do you know where
I could get some?
Kind regards,
Alex
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2) From: neal
Try this:http://www.sweetmarias.com/roasting-VisualGuideV2.htmlNeal
On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 2:40 AM, Cefé Surpreme 
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3) From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Cef=E9_Surpreme?=
Thanks Neal,
the roast degree gallery provided by sweet maria is certainly a good first
indication, but the problem with online-pictures is the calibrating of the
screen/print. What I am looking for is a standardised colour table that
allows me to compare my roasts over time consistently without saving spare
samples (which would chang colour over time probably anyway). Given that
some of you would use the same table we would even be able to compare our
roast result, at least in terms of colour.
An idea just crossed my mind: Color producers such as www.pantone.com should
be able to provide coulour tables which could be diverted from its intended
use....
Alex
ps. I would suggest to measure the colour after the grinding, since dry
processed coffee do not roast to even colour but after grinding yuo have an
average colour.
On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 11:55 AM, neal  wrote:
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4) From: Vicki Smith
Alex, this is an issue that comes up here on the list several times a =
year. I think the general consensus has been that colour matching is =
problematic and that no good tools really exist for the home roaster. At =
one point, SM even made up some colour tiles for folks to try to use.
I know that the SM roasters (Tom et al) compare the roasted grounds from =
one batch to another, and many of us do similar things. If I have nailed =
a batch, I reserve a small amount of beans, grind them, and put the =
results in a small plastic envelope. I know this is not something you =
are interested in doing, but it one of the more popular ways to compare =
roast to roast.
The real limitation is that this requires a completed roast--so you =
cannot make corrections mid-roast. Then, of course, there is the issue =
of roast colour not being the be all and end all of quality in the cup. =
How you get to a particular level of roast is always important.
I was one of the people who, when new to roasting, asked the same =
question. It is completely normal to ask it (it seems), but there never =
seems to be a great answer.
vicki
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5) From: Brett Mason
The best you are gong to get is color of the beans....
SO - here's a couple tips:
1. grind then compare - it's the roast through the bean, not just the
outermost roast level
2. look for the signs - did the bean double in size or not?
3. look for the signs - did the bean go through first crack?
4. look for the signs - did the beans go to second crack?
5. look for the signs - did the beans go past second crack?
6. look for the signs - did the beans get shiny as oil came to the surface?
7. look for the signs - did the color go from deep brown to jet black?
8. look for the signs - did the smoke alarms set off?
9. look for the signs - did more than one fire truck come?
Sherwin Williams has paint colors - I recommend "French Roast".  Color has
absolutely nothing to do with the beans, but it looks good in my basement.
Come visit, you'll see!
Brett
On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 4:40 AM, Cefé Surpreme 
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Cheers,
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6) From: Rich
The big thing to find when trying to match colors is a very broad =
spectrum light source.  Has to have a flat spectral response also.  This =
will cost more than the color chips.  Just wait till you see the cost of =
the color chips..  The squeak heard round the world.
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7) From: raymanowen
One could waste far less money- Just look up a Cosar SOS-40, or a MacBeth
color reflection densitometer on eBay. They're used to match color printing
for quality four color offset work. They have their own color corrected
light sources that you can find from Second Source. -ro
On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 3:40 AM, Cefé Surpreme 
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Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
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8) From: Rich
Good idea Ray.  You can get a Gretag D19C portable reflection =
densitometer for $535.00 (reserve not yet met by the way) and it closes =
in about an hour.  They will take PayPal.
Like I said, these things are not cheap.
As the lady explained earlier. Just grind the coffee and keep a sample =
then compare to the next batch in sunlight.  Close enough for government =
work.  And very low cost.
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9) From: Seth Grandeau
I've been using an LED flashlight to get consistent light on my roast
chamber.  The LED is a cool white (blue-ish), but it is very consistent from
roast to roast.  Regular daytime light is just too fickle.
On 3/3/08, Rich  wrote:
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10) From: Treshell
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Go to this pagehttp://www.sweetmarias.com/roasting-VisualGuideV2.htmlScroll down until you get to the pictures of
Agtron Roast Color Tiles above this he has pictures of roast.  Use all of
these with your roast and I think you will have the tools you are looking
for.  
Tres
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11) From: Vicki Smith
That is a great idea when looking at whole beans in a (sparkling clean) 
roast chamber, Seth!
When comparing two samples of ground coffee, I'm thinking that when 
eyeballing the *original* from an earlier roasting you are hoping to 
match and the new roast, the big deal is that they are both being viewed 
in the same light--regardless of whether it is sunshine or the light in 
a well lit room. You are looking for a great match, and nothing more.
vicki
Seth Grandeau wrote:
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12) From: Rich
If you use a light source that is primarily monochromatic you have no 
idea as to what you are looking at.  A plain edison light bulb will be 
adequate for coffee though.
Vicki Smith wrote:
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