HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Low tech solutions for some of life's problems... (7 msgs / 202 lines)
1) From: Paul Helbert
I've loaded a few photos of two small diy projects to a trial free website
that I'm evaluating:http://paddlelink.zoomshare.com/1.shtml/filesFour of the photos are low tech solution to resting roasted coffee. Valves
are salvaged from coffee bags. Hole saw, small rat-tail file, scissors and
tape were used. The first generation used food grade epoxy to hold and seal
the valves in  place, but this does not allow easy renewal. Second
generation (with the tape) works just fine.
The other three are of a non-electrical means of controlling temperature
(adding heat) to an air popper roast. I used aluminum flashing, a few pop
rivets, clamps and a chaffing dish snuffer that I found in a thrift store.
Had to buy the chaffing dish for half a dollar to get the snuffer. Nothing
really new here, big commercial roasters control the air flow similarly. I
just kept reading of people roasting in boxes in cold weather or using
variable transformers to boost voltage. This, with the heater switched
independent of the fan, allow a great deal of control.
Paul
-- 
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2) From: Dave Kvindlog
On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 9:11 PM, Paul Helbert  wrote:
<Snip>
Very cool.  I was thinking of doing something to this end earlier this
winter when we had sub-zero temps.  Thanks for sharing your pics!
-- 
Dave Kvindlog
iHomeroast
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
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3) From: Larry Johnson
Great photos. I especially like the damper/throttle made from the
chafing-dish snuffer.
On 3/3/08, Paul Helbert  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
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4) From: Lisa J. Carton
really nice.....love it!
Larry Johnson  wrote:  Great photos. I especially like the damper/throttle made from the
chafing-dish snuffer.
On 3/3/08, Paul Helbert 
wrote:
<Snip>
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5) From:
I'm mpressed! I showed my boss your pics. I suspect he might start roasting soon.
---- Paul Helbert  wrote: 
<Snip>
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6) From: Jason Brooks
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Hash: SHA1
Paul Helbert wrote:
| I've loaded a few photos of two small diy projects to a trial free website
| that I'm evaluating:http://paddlelink.zoomshare.com/1.shtml/files|
| Four of the photos are low tech solution to resting roasted coffee. Valves
| are salvaged from coffee bags. Hole saw, small rat-tail file, scissors and
| tape were used. The first generation used food grade epoxy to hold and
seal
| the valves in  place, but this does not allow easy renewal. Second
| generation (with the tape) works just fine.
|
| The other three are of a non-electrical means of controlling temperature
| (adding heat) to an air popper roast. I used aluminum flashing, a few pop
| rivets, clamps and a chaffing dish snuffer that I found in a thrift store.
| Had to buy the chaffing dish for half a dollar to get the snuffer. Nothing
| really new here, big commercial roasters control the air flow similarly. I
| just kept reading of people roasting in boxes in cold weather or using
| variable transformers to boost voltage. This, with the heater switched
| independent of the fan, allow a great deal of control.
|
| Paul
|
Please, do tell, where did you get the damper?  And what is it that
you've so well cobbled together?  Love the looks.  I've played with
dampers before, but never heavily.
I'd be interested to know and thanks for sharing the pics.
Jason
- --
Jason Brooks
jbrookshttp://javajeb.wordpress.com- -------------------------------
Enjoying good coffee in the Heart of Virginia
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7) From: Paul Helbert
I started with lamp chimneys. Good visibility, good for keeping the beans in
but hard to attach anything for a damper. Did a few roasts holding an
inverted beaker over the exhaust (used a pot holder second time), which
proved the concept. I had been looking for a solution for quite a while,
Thought about automotive throttle butterfly valves and the linkages, tin
cans with vents cut in the bottoms (tops), etc., then one day while in a
thrift store I saw the chaffing dish and bought it. All you need is the top.
The rest goes into the junk for some other project or recycling.
The chimney is just a piece of aluminum flashing. It comes in rolls of
different widths for a few dollars at Lowe's or Orange Lowe's (Home Depot).
I used tin snips but ordinary scissors will work. Just roll it tighter until
the diameter is correct to fit the top you took off the chafing dish cover.
Carefully drill three 1/8" holes, approximately equally spaced around the
edge of the cover. Then, drill through one of these holes right through the
aluminum where it overlaps itself. Pop rivet it at that point and repeat for
the other two holes.
The clamps you see in the photos are just to keep the chimney from bottoming
out in the popper. I had previously removed the plastic vane from the
Bakelite upper barrel and my thermocouple protrudes through the side of the
pot metal of the roasting chamber so I didn't want the sensor to get hit by
the aluminum. Smaller hose clamps might look neater but I used what I had.
Three keeps the thing stable and vertical. I might pop rivet the clamps to
the chimney someday because the collar tends to slide a bit.
When I roast with the P1, I usually do 100 to 150 gram batches. I begin with
a cold popper without the chimney and with the popper tilted about thirty
degrees. After the beans begin to loose moisture and get rambunctious I set
it level. I don't add the chimney until the heat ramp slows to just under
ten degrees per minute which usually occurs around eight to ten minutes into
the roast. First crack usually occurs a few minutes thereafter and
occasional modulation of the throttle allows me to keep the temperature
building at five to ten degrees per minute until I dump to my colander over
fan for cooling. I almost always stretch three to four minutes between
cracks if I go that far.
|
<Snip>
Jason, I apologize. I have done what my kids used to get after me for...gone
on too long to answer a simple question. Anyhow, I have found two of these
chaffing dish throttles and several others a bit bigger (sometimes with a
brass finish) in junk shops this winter. Keep a sharp eye out and you'll
find something that will work Maybe even find something better and share it
with the rest of us.
BTW: Where in Central VA? I'm in the Valley, not far from Harrisonburg.
-- 
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