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Topic: Cleaning a Gaggia Careffa (18 msgs / 313 lines)
1) From: Ken B
My almost 2 year old Gaggia Careffa has started to leak, and the pucks 
from the shots are showing either pitting or waves on the top of the 
puck.  This developed suddenly last weekend, and seems to be getting 
worse.  I cleaned the slot where the handle locks in with q-tips, but 
this does seem to have fixed the problem, nor made any impact at all.  I 
was used to grinding the coffee, pressing the puck, and letting the 
coffee warm a couple of minutes before pulling the shot.  I cannot do 
this now as water leaks into the coffee and starts to drip brew it.
I have always used filtered water in this machine.  I m not sure what to 
do next other than tear it apart and see if there is anything I can 
see.  But before such drastic measures, I thought I would ask the list, 
since there seems to be a wide breadth of knowledge here.  Does anyone 
have any idea as to whether there are seals or o-rings or the like on 
this machine that need maintenance or replacement?  (if there are, they 
are not listed in the book that came with it)
Any help/suggestions would be appreciated.
Best Regards,
Ken B
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2) From: Michael Dhabolt
Ken,
If I am understanding your description of the problem correctly, it
sounds like a citric acid treatment is what I would try first.  There
are numerous threads on HB and CoffeeGeek that will step you through
the process.
Mike (just plain)
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3) From: Ken B
Heh, ok I went back and dug the large book out, it it would appear #15 
may be the issue, the Guamizione softacappa.  I will try to dig it out 
and see if it needs to be reset or replaced.
And I am not Italian...I thought it was a Careffa, not Carezza.  I bet 
te people who wrote early English had a hard time with that too. They 
sure LOOK like f's.  ;-)
Ken B
Ken B wrote:
<Snip>
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4) From: Ken B
Thanks Mike (just plain), I clean her fairly regularly.  I think perhaps 
the seal I mentioned is either bad, or needs to be reset.  At least, I 
will try this first, then go for the commercial grade cleaning.
Best Regards,
Ken B
Michael Dhabolt wrote:
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5) From: Sandy Andina
Every machine should have its grouphead gasket replaced annually or  
even semiannually. Rubber doesn't last forever. And don't store the  
portafilter locked on to the grouphead when the machine is turned off-- 
that keeps the rubber compressed and accelerates the wear. (I speak  
from bitter experience--I always used to keep the Livia's PF locked in  
24/7, and went through an extremely traumatic gasket replacement at  
least six months late).
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
On Mar 9, 2008, at 12:59 PM, Ken B wrote:
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6) From: Ken B
Hi Sandy...it looks like you were right on.  It is leaking around the 
gasket.  The thing is going to be a bugger to change though. It was 
difficult enough just to get in there and try to reseat it if it had 
come loose.  So, I wonder where I go to get a gasket for this thing?  
Gaggia-USA says parts on their site, but only list burrs for grinders 
and the like.
Does anyone on the list know where to get Gaggia parts?  It looks like I 
need a gasket NG01/001 Guarnizione sottocoppa, called the filterholder 
gasket in the English directions.  Heck, I may as well buy 4 or 5 since 
they can't cost too much, can they?
While I am at it, I could also use any help any of you might offer on 
replacing this thing.  As I said, just getting in to push on the old one 
was an exercise, since I did not want to scratch the filter or tear the 
gasket, and it is a very tight fit into the head.
And I agree with you Sandy.  I never store the portafilter fully 
compressed.  Just enough to know where it is. ;-)
Best Regards,
Ken B
Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>
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7) From: miKe mcKoffee
Google (or Internet search engine of your choice) gaggia group gasket.... 
<Snip>
tmariascoffee.com
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tmariascoffee.com
<Snip>
tmariascoffee.com
<Snip>
tmariascoffee.com
<Snip>
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8) From: Ken B
Thank miKe,
I had already ordered them when I read your reply.  I needed to change 
my Google search to be less specific. ;-)  So you were right on the 
money too.  Figured I might as well get a new shower screen while I was 
there. ;-)
Ken B
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
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9) From: Rich
One of the better ways to extract evil, hard gaskets is to use a dental 
pick.  You will need a real one, not the chinese copy, they bend.
Ken B wrote:
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10) From: Ken B
I found an article on how to do it on the site I ordered the gasket 
from.  So I think I am set.
Thanks for the ideas and suggestions folks.
Ken B
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11) From: Ken B
Thanks for reminding me Rich.  I have real ones.  One of my hobbies is 
Palaeontology, so I have a set to clean up the parts the electric pick 
is too dangerous for.
Ken B
Rich wrote:
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12) From: Allon Stern
On Mar 9, 2008, at 6:02 PM, Rich wrote:
<Snip>
Better than metal dental picks for most delicate work - get a small  
collection of spudgers. They help when prying apart consumer  
electronics without scratching them, and can scrape coffee gook off  
of grinder innards without scratching them either.
I'm particular to this one:http://www.eclipsetools.com/ProductPics/
Latest%20.jpegs/900-140.JPG
which is designed for pushing and pulling wires in a 66 block  
(telephone punch down block) without shorting the terminals; It's  
plastic, and the small hook looks fragile, but will actually put up  
with a good bit of abuse.
I also have several other plastic tools which are useful for working  
around live electronics which are also useful for their non-scratching.
-
allon
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13) From: Paul Helbert
Google only found about *1,210* hits for *spudgers* in *0.10* seconds.
I love learning new things!
-- 
Paul Helbert
"The time has come, to talk of many things..."
-- The Walrus to the Carpenter
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14) From: Allon Stern
On Mar 9, 2008, at 11:23 PM, Paul Helbert wrote:
<Snip>
And it's fun to say!
Spudger spudger spudger spudger spudger spudger spudger spudger  
spudger spudger spudger spudger spudger spudger spudger spudger  
spudger spudger spudger spudger spudger!!!
-
allon
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15) From: Sandy Andina
Several online resources suggest driving a small screw into the gasket  
and then using it as a "handle" (gripped by pliers if necessary) to  
pull the gasket out. This won't work if the gasket is too far gone,  
however. I ended up using the screwdriver tip as a chisel, along with  
a meat pounder and steak knife. (You don't wanna know, trust me).
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
On Mar 9, 2008, at 9:42 PM, Allon Stern wrote:
<Snip>
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16) From: Rich
That will work, if you happen to have a couple ready at hand.  I was 
thinking of using the dental pick with the sharp 90 degree hook on the 
end to puncture the gasket and allow pulling from its seat.  Like a 
packing puller.
Allon Stern wrote:
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17) From: Rich
That is exactly why I suggested the dental pick.  Ossified gasket is 
difficult to remove.  The screw trick never seems to work for me either. 
  Sharp cold chisel and suitable small bludgeon usually gets it out though.
Work the dental pick between the gasket and the housing and then twist 
to get the hook under the gasket, pull.
Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>
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18) From: Ed Needham
I've used a long deck screw.  They have a self tapping configuration on the 
very sharp tip and it'll tunnel into and under the gasket.  Once you have 
part of it off, a small screwdriver can pry the rest of it out.  A warm 
machine makes it easier, since the gasket is more pliable and the gooey 
residues don't hold as well.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************


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