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Topic: melange question (5 msgs / 178 lines)
1) From: Dean De Crisce
If I may ask a question. I am very interested in the melange concept. I haven't done it with particular roasts because 1. I'm lazy and 2. I'm still experimenting with beans one roast at a time. However, before I got the behmor a couple of months ago, I roasted primarily by popper and the oven. The oven allowed pretty large batches easily...but roasted them unevenly. Most articles seemed to hold the uneveness as a fault, but some suggested that it increased cup complexity. Would the melange provide something different from what I was getting in the oven (although that was a combo of mult roast levels)? Does it actually taste different from a roast level midway between the two levels. I'd be interested in thoughts on the subject. Thanks.
Dean De Crisce
Sent from a Treo.

2) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Yes it does taste different 
With something like the IMV the City side has the fruit and the FC side
has more choclate type notes 
If you just roast to the middle you will only see a bit of either not
both fully like a melange...
IMO and YMMV
Dennis

3) From: Rick Copple
Dean De Crisce wrote:
<Snip>
Many like the melange mix. Some don't. For those that don't, not 
roasting evenly is a bad thing. Otherwise, it is good!
I've roasted in a wok for several years now, and that also creates a 
more uneven roast, even between sides of the same bean! So it is a form 
of melange, but it is not a "controlled" melange. IOW, it will have 
beans at all various stages of roast levels. If you intentionally make a 
melange roast with an even roasting bean roaster, you'll have beans at 
primarily two or three stages of roast, however many levels you roast to 
throw together. So the mix and where most of the beans fall in the roast 
is better controlled. And I would imagine with some beans that is a 
plus. You may know that you want two sweet spot flavors of a certain 
bean, so you need to roast two batches to that sweet spot. An oven or 
wok roast will have some beans in that sweet spot, but many not, which 
can take away from the flavor you're shooting for. So, it depends on 
what you want and the bean.
But, I've rarely not liked the flavors my wok produces. I've always been 
pleased with it. It's just a lot of work, which is one reason I'm 
getting a Behmor. Insert, relax and watch the beans go around without me 
having to stir constantly for 17 to 20 minutes. :)
-- 
Rick Copple
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4) From: Brett Mason
If you want a proper melange, you need beans roasted well to two
separate levels of roast.  Each bean ought to stand up on its own to
meet the taste profile intended.  Then the Melange will properly
combine tastes.
Alternately, roast some beans ad-hoc, so that the outside is overdone
and the inside is raw.  The sour taste will shine through. Then
Melange them - you'll multiply your sours and add some other taste
nuances too.
Melange is not hte method for lazy roasting, it takes as much care as
any good single origin roast, and then demands you do it again for the
other bean.
A good Melange is tasty...
Brett
On Tue, Mar 25, 2008 at 8:11 AM, Dean De Crisce  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.comHomeroast mailing list
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5) From: George Chow
Dean De Crisce wrote:
<Snip>
Hi Dean,
I also did melange but I roast them in separate batches and blend them together after roasting. I think the flavor is different and probably is suitable for certain beans.  Blue bottle coffee in San Francisco roast their single origin  Mexican Chiapas  as melange, but I don't think they roast them in one batch. I think the only way is to roast 3 batches - 2 small with one darker and 1 large with uneven roast and do a taste test.
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