HomeRoast Digest


Topic: culling greens (14 msgs / 384 lines)
1) From: Bill
I'm curious how many listers pick through their green coffee before
roasting.  I've read multiple warnings in Tom's reviews to avoid "eye
cupping," not to evaluate the coffee based on how the greens look (an aside:
the Bali was a really nice green).  So I'm curious how seriously people
examine their greens before roasting.
Do you look at your greens?  What do you put them on?
What do you cull?  In every review, Tom notes how many defects are present
per amount... so do you bother with broken beans? black beans? tiny beans?
 And obviously, the defects vary by origin and processing...
To answer my own questions, I have started examining greens before I roast
them.  I put them on a cookie sheet (20 oz at a time) and examine them.  I
pull black beans, and some broken beans, but that's it.  I don't want to
take too many out, but I have definitely been wondering if I should be
culling more beans...
Any input is appreciated!
bill
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

2) From: peterz
Hi Bill,
I think you are right about inspecting. So far (almost) I have been 
pretty lucky  and have found the few pebbles while the beans were in the 
cooler. However, I did miss a small piece of wire :( and it quickly 
stopped my Mazzer Mini!
It got jammed between the burrs and the wall on that little scraper like 
thingie that sticks up above the burrs.
Stopped it dead!
Took a while, and a wrench, to get it all ready to grind gain.
So, yes, it is a good idea to check the beans.
You find so few bad items from Tom that it is a temptation not to 
bother, but I think the things that you do find are worth finding, and 
that makes your grinder happier also.
PeterZ
Bill wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

3) From: Bill
Peter,
Thanks for the report!  Tell me, do you ever pull greens before you roast
them?  If so, why?  If no, why not?
bill
On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 6:05 PM, peterz  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

4) From: Brett Mason
I glance before roasting, and also after.  Helps that I cool my beans in one
layer on granite counter - most problem payloads are found before the beans
go to jars...
Brett
On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 7:05 PM, peterz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Brett
  If I am not causing you to think, then I am letting you down.
 http://www.xanga.com/rockinjava9Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

5) From: John Despres
I might look for some gray ones post-roast and pull them out, but I =
don't do anything before hand. I figure the quality coffee Tom sells has =
been sorted properly.
One benefit of the Gene Cafe is the glass drum. As the beans darken and =
tumble, it's very easy to spot stones. I have a little jar to collect =
treasures like stones and odd gray beans.
John
Bill wrote:
<Snip>
e:
<Snip>
e.com
<Snip>
/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
<Snip>
-- =
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions 
JDs Coffee Provoked Ramblings =
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee=.com
Homeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/=gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820

6) From: raymanowen
"Do you look at your greens?"  Yes. When transferring to the scale pan to
weigh them out; when they were in the process of becoming ungreen, one
wasn't so green to start and it didn't change. An easy find.
That, plus the one that was yellow like pop corn from the start. Those are
the two I've ever gotten from SM.
"What do you put them on?" Number Nine.
When you're roasting for others in large or multiple batches, the debris is
far more likely to evade detection- especially for those that like to push
buttons and go do something else- while the machine roasts the coffee.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Room?
On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 3:52 PM, Bill  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

7) From: Floyd Lozano
I usually only bother with this on the stuff that dries on the ground
(Yemen, some Indian) and hand-processed coffees.  I've gotten beans
from SM and from other clubs and the SM lots are much much cleaner.  I
was sorely tempted to sort the latest Harar lot, as it's (relatively
speaking) pretty ugly, but left it as it to see how the cup would
develop.  I still should sort out the ones that resisted the roast
though, as the review suggests!  And in any case, I do the quick
eyeball inspection like Brett and pull any obviously black beans or
small fragments that will roast too quickly and 'darken' the flavors
in the cup.
-F
On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 8:18 PM, Bill  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

8) From: Edward Bourgeois
I do some pre and some post picking. I tend to check my espresso
roasts more carefully because the effect of a couple defect beans on
14grams is  a higher percentage than 50+gr. for drip. Pre I look for
any foreign matter and pick defect beans in order of effect. Black
beans(stinkers) Moldy, insect damage, floaters(under ripe), broken.
Post I mostly look for very light colored beans. With dry processed
coffees due to the process there tend to be more floaters. A few
floaters in a DP are kinda a part of the character of the coffee and
will not generally pick them all out. here is Toms pic. of defectshttp://www.sweetmarias.com/look.at.green.htmlOn Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 8:18 PM, Bill  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Ed Bourgeois aka farmroast
Amherst MA.http://coffee-roasting.blogspot.com/Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

9) From: Coffee
I spread the greens out on a cookie sheet and look them over before  
roasting. And spread them out on a cookie sheet to finish cooling  
after roasting and look them over again. I only pull out obvious  
problems.
-Peter (no Z)
On Mar 31, 2008, at 5:42 PM, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

10) From: Tom Ulmer
I spread mine out on a large white cutting board and cull the obviously
defective - black, on the way to black, insect damaged, deformed, immature,
and the shattered. 
As you mention, what passes for good beans is quite different in let's say a
dry processed Yemen and a pretty Panamanian and culling all the ugly beans
from the Yemen would be a mistake.
Besides the occasional dirt clod or small stone, there are hairs, fibers,
parchment or silver skin that don't make it to the roast.

11) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
I have found 1 rock todate in my IMV batch found it post roast (easy to
see gray with brown everywhere) I normally will give the beans a once
over but very rarely will I throw out more than just a couple in a 2-3
pound batch.
Dennis

12) From: sci
I cull all of my green beans and remove: black, severely shriveled, rocks,
dirt, ugly beans, etc etc. Anything that doesn't look like a healthy green
bean gets culled. Brokens are okay.
It is hard to say how this affects cup quality, but I just don't like crappy
beans in my batches. Of course, I'm doing small amounts from 5oz to 1lb and
that makes this fine tooth comb approach feasible.
The worst beans to clean are Harar, Yemeni, other Ethiopian DP beans.
For what its worth,
Ivan
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 15:52:32 -0600
From: Bill 
Subject: [Homeroast] culling greens
To: homeroast
Message-ID:
       <22428b320803311452t893c89dif0c1375e004b060e>
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetO-8859-1
I'm curious how many listers pick through their green coffee before
roasting.  I've read multiple warnings in Tom's reviews to avoid "eye
cupping," not to evaluate the coffee based on how the greens look (an aside:
the Bali was a really nice green).  So I'm curious how seriously people
examine their greens before roasting.
Do you look at your greens?  What do you put them on?
What do you cull?  In every review, Tom notes how many defects are present
per amount... so do you bother with broken beans? black beans? tiny beans?
 And obviously, the defects vary by origin and processing...
To answer my own questions, I have started examining greens before I roast
them.  I put them on a cookie sheet (20 oz at a time) and examine them.  I
pull black beans, and some broken beans, but that's it.  I don't want to
take too many out, but I have definitely been wondering if I should be
culling more beans...
Any input is appreciated!
bill
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

13) From: Larry English
I cull as soon as the shipment gets here (in plastic), on a cookie sheet
with a sheet of white paper, then transfer to SM's cloth bags - almost all
my purchases are 2 pounders.  Anything that looks wrong goes - but that's
usually no more than a couple of things.  Dry process (E. Africa, Brazil)
get the closest look, and that's where I find the occasional stone or other
foreign object.  A while back, pre-SM days, I found a small lava rock in a
Kona bag - wonder if I should have sent it back to appease Pele?  From
Africa I find woody objects more than stones.  (I think they're wood ...)
The Gene Cafe is indeed nice for spotting bad beans during roast.  I also
cool on a large perforated cookie sheet in single layer over a downdraft fan
so can pick out those that didn't properly roast.
Larry
On Tue, Apr 1, 2008 at 4:23 PM, sci  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

14) From: Seth Grandeau
"From Africa I find woody objects more than stones.  (I think they're wood
...)"
Perhaps you got a little Kopi Luwak in your coffee. :)
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures 9upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20


HomeRoast Digest