HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee beans (24 msgs / 550 lines)
1) From: Strega7
I just received my Home Innovations coffee roaster about one week ago. It 
works as advertised, but I don't seem to be getting the flavor from the beans 
I selected with the machine. Can anyone recommend a good, flavorful coffee to 
roast?
Thanks,
Bob Smith

2) From: Steve Shank
There are way too many variables to respond to your question. What beans=
 are you using. What kinds do you like. How are you making your coffee?=
 What kind of grinder are you using? How many grams of coffee per ounces of=
 water? If you are getting not enough flavor, then try more coffee. If you=
 want a different kind of flavor, more of something, less of something=
 else, give us some clues. The flavors of different coffees are VERY=
 different. Some like a lighter coffee with more acidity, others fuller and=
 darker. If you aren't sure, then get a pak of 8 different half pound bags=
 from Sweet Maria's, roast as tom suggests for each coffee, and explore=
 what you like.
My wild guess is that you are using a drip coffee maker which does not heat=
 water enough to get good extraction and using too little coffee.
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********
On 01/14/2002 at 5:49 PM Strega7 wrote:
I just received my Home Innovations coffee roaster about one week ago. It=
 works as advertised, but I don't seem to be getting the flavor from the=
 beans I selected with the machine. Can anyone recommend a good, flavorful=
 coffee to roast? 
Thanks, 
Bob Smith
Steve Shank
Oregon Computer Solutionshttp://www.steveshank.com

3) From: Steven Tock
--
On Mon, 14 Jan 2002 17:49:56  
 Strega7 wrote:
<Snip>
I am partial to Ethiopians myself. Try either an Ethiopian Harar or Sidamo. But before you do, let me ask a few questions.
What beans are you roasting now that are not flavorful enough for you? How long after you roast the beans are you grinding/brewing?
Some coffees require 12-24 hours or more rest time to reach their 
full flavor. What degree of roast are you using?
Steve
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: coffenut
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Bob,
I've recently roasted some of Tom's Mexican Tres Flechas and Ethiopian
Organic Limmu in my HWP and the flavor was excellent.  I really love about
95% of what Tom sells, and occasionally you find a bean that stands out like
these two.
I usually roast several days worth at a time (or about 1lb) which means I
have to do 6 back-to-back roasts in the HWP to hit that level.  As you'll
learn, when doing back-to-back roasts, the first roast runs a little longer
in time versus the roasts that follow because the HWP is starting from a
"cold state".  I always set the HWP timer all the way to the max and
intervene with the "cool" button at the point the roast level has been
reached.  I usually follow Tom's recommendations for roast levels and find
them spot on for my tastes.
Here's what I did with these two bean types to get 3 back-to-back roasts of
each bean (including the time I manually pressed cool on the HWP).  I
roasted in-doors at about 72F room temperature.  The only rest time between
the 6 batches was the time to dump the beans and clean the chaff from the
unit.  I ground some of the Mexican the next morning (after 12hrs rest), and
let the Limmu rest for 48hrs to further develop flavor.
-          Mexican Tres Flechas (1st batch  8:00, 2nd batch  6:45, 3rd
batch  6:30)
-          Ethiopian Organic Limmu (1st, 2nd, and 3rd batches - 5:30)  Note:
The times for the Limmu would have been a little longer, (probably about a
minute) if I'd been working from a cold state with the roaster.  I roasted
the Tres Flechas first and then followed with the Limmu.
Coffenut  :^)

5) From: Ed Needham
Care to share a bit more about your experience?  Which beans?  What
doesn't taste right?  Sour?  Burnt?  Flat?  Tell us.
As to my favorite beans...Sumatra Blue Lintong (I can't find it
anymore), Tanzanian Peaberry, Kenya AA, Yemen...just to name a few.
Regards,
Ed Needham
ed

6) From: Ken Mary
It seems like this is your first try at roasting, so do not be discouraged.
Roasting coffee takes a lot of time and devotion to do it well. After 2
years I am still learning new things. Read everything you can and do not be
afraid to experiment. Proper brewing is also worthwhile to study. Improper
brewing of good beans will give you bad coffee, or at least not as good as
it should be.
All of the beans that I have bought from SM's gave me good coffee in spite
of my early attempts at roasting. But everyone's tastes are different, so
there maybe coffees that you do not like, no matter how they are roasted.
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coffee to roast?
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7) From: Bryan & Larina
<Snip>
brewing of good beans will give you bad coffee, or at least not as good
as
it should be.
What types of things should we consider about brewing?
Thanks,
Bryan
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

8) From: Ken Mary
You may not like what I have to say, so feel free to ignore me. 8^)
If you have a drip brewer, *any* drip brewer, throw it away or sell it.
If you do not already have one, get a conical burr grinder.
Learn how to use a french press. Get used to the little bit of sediment. Be
sure to preheat the press, and use a thermometer to be sure the actual
brewing temperature is between 195 and 205F. Vary the grind and steep time
to suit your taste.
Completely ignore *all* other brew methods until you have perfected the
french press. Then you will have no need for anything else.
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9) From: Bryan & Larina
Actually I have already experienced French press at Starbucks and really
liked it.  We have one of those grind and brew drip makers so we are
already used to and accept the sediment.
What type of press would you recommend?  Both my wife and I like to have
multiple cups (roughly two standard cups each) so capacity is a concern.
Do you heat the water in a pan or use some other method?
Thanks for all your help!
Bryan

10) From: Ken Mary
Buy a cheap 1 liter Bodum (or any brand) with no metal parts except the 
plunger. Put the press pot with water in the microwave and heat to boiling.
Stir the heated water while measuring the temperature, then add the coffee.
Alternatively, you could heat the water in an electric kettle or on the
stove. Boil up extra water to preheat the press pot, dump out the preheat
water, add coffee, and fill to whatever level you want after you check the
temperature. With practice, you can just time the cooling and forget the
thermometer.
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11) From: Strega7
Boy am I impressed! I had no idea my question about "what kind of coffee 
beans should I use in my one week old Home Innovations Precision coffee 
roaster would be the best for flavor" would generate all the great 
responses!! Obviously, I left out a lot of much needed information for help 
on this subject. 
So far I have roasted Panama Bouquete-Finca Maunier & Sumatra Mandheling DP 
Gr.1 '01. I have timed the roasting to Sweet Maria's (Tom's) suggested time 
for City roast, 6.5 minutes, by a stop watch. 
I have a blade grinder & ground the beans to a fine grind. I used a 
tablespoon of the ground coffee per cup in my Krup drip coffee maker. I have 
no idea what temperature the water is in that machine. I'm sure it's not 195 
- 205 degrees, though. 
So far the coffee that I pour is flat, no real coffee flavor that I'm used to.
I dug out an older Bodum French Press that has been stored away for some 
years, & will try it this evening, per Ken Mary's suggestion.
You all suggested about six different coffee beans that you like. Seems the 
favorite of several is Ethiopian. The small plastic bags of beans from 
Maria's seem to be the way to go at my stage of roasting. I'll try ordering 
more of the sample bags coffee's you have suggested. 
Thank you all very much for your help & suggestions. I'll write again on my 
results, but if you have anymore tips, please post them.
Bob Smith 
  

12) From: floyd burton
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Have the HWP and would suggest you use the ear, nose and eye method of
determining when your roast is where you want it.  I would suggest roasting
into the beginning of the second crack.  Wait till you hear the rice krispy
crack get going-and then hit the cool button.  I roast till this stage and
if I start getting round divets or see oil, I have over roasted for my
taste.  Some people like the taste of the roast and not the subtle flavors
of the coffee.  Uh try chrbucks for the former.
Would also suggest you spend some time investigating a different grinder-I
started off with a blade grinder-look at the results carefully-eeeech from
dust to boulders and it will make a difference in your cup.  You might take
some of your roasted beans into a supermarket that has a grinder for their
customers-really clean out the spout, select the appropriate grind and grind
the beans into a paper bag.  Gotta be tricky in this world.  Ground coffee
has a very short shelf life-the essential oils disappear quickly-hours some
say and I do not doubt them.
By the way-worked with a Bob Smith at The CCC-that you by chance.

13) From: Steve Shank
Target sells bodum french presses, Tom sells them, $arbucks sells them.=
 They appear the same in the box. They are NOT the same. Things to=
 consider:
1. you will want both a nylon and a metal filter screen
2. There should be a metal springy thing around the outer area of the press=
 shoving the metal screen against the glass. Cheap  ones do not have this=
 and grinds come through the outside of the filter between the glass and=
 the springs.
3. every six months or so use TSP (starbucks has it) to clean the french=
 press or you'll taste the old oils, yuch.
4. I'd recommend making 2 pots, so you are drinking fresh coffee.
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********
On 01/15/2002 at 6:35 AM Bryan & Larina wrote:
<Snip>
Steve Shank
Oregon Computer Solutionshttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.steveshank.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

14) From: Steve Shank
A couple of suggestions:
1. use about twice as much coffee
2. Do use the french press
3. (and people will disagree with me here) DO NOT buy Ethiopian.
Now before people scream and yell, two of my favorite coffees are=
 ethiopian. They are totally different. They are both wild. I'd suggest=
 learning more about what you like and then after awhile selecting an=
 ethiopian (or kenyan) that seems to match your tastes. Or, try one to=
 experiment with other weird things. I do not serve kenyan or ethiopian or=
 some others to people without understanding their taste in coffee. They=
 are too radical.
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********
On 01/15/2002 at 1:26 PM Strega7 wrote:
Boy am I impressed! I had no idea my question about "what kind of coffee=
 beans should I use in my one week old Home Innovations Precision coffee=
 roaster would be the best for flavor" would generate all the great=
 responses!! Obviously, I left out a lot of much needed information for=
 help on this subject. 
So far I have roasted Panama Bouquete-Finca Maunier & Sumatra Mandheling DP=
 Gr.1 '01. I have timed the roasting to Sweet Maria's (Tom's) suggested=
 time for City roast, 6.5 minutes, by a stop watch. 
I have a blade grinder & ground the beans to a fine grind. I used a=
 tablespoon of the ground coffee per cup in my Krup drip coffee maker. I=
 have no idea what temperature the water is in that machine. I'm sure it's=
 not 195 - 205 degrees, though. 
So far the coffee that I pour is flat, no real coffee flavor that I'm used=
 to. 
I dug out an older Bodum French Press that has been stored away for some=
 years, & will try it this evening, per Ken Mary's suggestion. 
You all suggested about six different coffee beans that you like. Seems the=
 favorite of several is Ethiopian. The small plastic bags of beans from=
 Maria's seem to be the way to go at my stage of roasting. I'll try=
 ordering more of the sample bags coffee's you have suggested. 
Thank you all very much for your help & suggestions. I'll write again on my=
 results, but if you have anymore tips, please post them. 
Bob Smith 
Steve Shank
Oregon Computer Solutionshttp://www.steveshank.com

15) From: Jeff Morris
A Pox on Coffee Snobbishness!!!   You can get fine coffee using any method,
as long as the coffee is fresh and the water is hot!   Its true that a $15
Mr. Coffee doesn't do it, but the high quality auto drips like Techivorm,
Bunn and Capresso are worthy coffee makers.  Also, manual drips are fine,
too!  In fact, as the owner of 4 or 5 French presses, 3 vacuum makers,
numerous manual drips, and several good auto-drips I can say the French
Press is my least favorite method.
For a beginner, I'd recommend a single cup manual drip - its the easiest and
cheapest way to get consistent, high quality coffee.
So try them all, and don't think that you have to use one particular method
to get a proper cup.
BTW, this morning I made for my wife and myself  Kona in a Capresso, and
served my mother-in-law Ghimbi Decaf and a French press.  Tonight I'll
probably make a pot of decaf in a Cona.
-jeff
P.S  But do get a good burr grinder.

16) From: Arabela
In a message dated 1/15/02 1:29:06 PM Eastern Standard Time, Strega7 
writes:
<Snip>
this may be one of your problems. you should use 2 tablespoons per cup, or 
one coffee scoop (rounded, not level). try that and maybe try roasting a 
little farther. if you roast too light the flavor will not be as intense (i'm 
sure some will disagree, but that's just my opinion). just experiment with 
different methods of brewing to see what you like best. i used to use a drip 
and i liked it okay, then started using a french press and liked that much 
better, and now am using a moka pot most of the time. that's the fun of home 
roasting, you can roast to whatever level suits your tastes (once you 
experiment and discover what that is), and you can use whatever method you 
like the best or different ones every day. try them all out, and you can find 
the instructions on each method at the sweet maria's site. 
hope that helps. 
:o)

17) From: Steven Tock
--
On Tue, 15 Jan 2002 13:26:10  
 Strega7 wrote:
<Snip>
This may be the whole problem. I would double the amount of ground coffee you are currently using, and try the french press tonight like you said.
Steve
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

18) From: Strega7
Thanks Steve,
Sounds like your right on. I'll let you know soon.
Bob Smith 

19) From: Strega7
Thanks,
I'm sure going to try more coffee in a French press. Sounds like it will fix 
that problem.
Bob Smith

20) From: Steven Dover

21) From: Strega7
Thanks, Floyd.
I'll try your method tomorrow morning.
I like your idea about the supermarket grinder & a bag. I guess we could use 
one of their keep fresh bags huh?

22) From: Strega7
I tried the French press with two heaping tablespoons of coffee per cup this 
morning. Sure does taste better for me!
Thanks,
Bob Smith

23) From: Strega7
Thanks again Steve,
I used the French press & twice as much coffee this morning. Seems like I'm 
"getting there," for my taste. That Ethiopian coffee sounds like I might like 
it.  You've got my interest up now.
Bob Smith

24) From: Steve Shank
Now start experimenting with a little more, a little less and find exactly=
 what you find most satisfying. If you have a good scale that'll measure=
 grams it will help.
*********** REPLY SEPARATOR ***********
On 01/16/2002 at 7:20 PM Strega7 wrote:
I tried the French press with two heaping tablespoons of coffee per cup=
 this morning. Sure does taste better for me! 
Thanks, 
Bob Smith
Steve Shank
Oregon Computer Solutionshttp://www.steveshank.com


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