HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Homeroasting Evangelism (27 msgs / 985 lines)
1) From: sci
I have some queries for the list.
1. About what percentage of coffee drinkers roast their own coffee.
(If I had to guess, I'd say less than 1%, much less). What do you think is
the potential top percentage given our convenience culture?
2. What would be the overall advantages and disadvantages of increasing the
number of homeroasters?
[Aside from the clear advantage of increasing business for everybody's
favorite green coffee vendor, our host, how does it help? I remember reading
something that claimed our ability to get great beans depends on the rest of
the world drinking the poor quality beans--a kind of bourgeois coffee class
depending on a  proletariat coffee class.]
3. How have your efforts at homeroasting evangelism been going? Do you try?
Or does it not matter to you?
(This thought was provoked when I read the article about Ed--btw, nice
work). I have been very enthusiastic about this craft, sharing my beans and
brew, and I have only been able to get 3 people to try roasting. On the
other side, lots of people think I'm eccentric (but I could have told them
that from day 1 ;~)
4. How do non-coffee drinking family members think about this?
[I'm roundly accused by untactful members as being an "addict,"
"cult-member" and worse! Yea, next thing you know, I'm gonna start mixing up
Kool-Aid laced with ritual coffee extracts :-0
Any feedback on these "coffee sociology" questions would be appreciated.
Ivan
CSA Lic. # 1312939005-A
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2) From: Bob Hazen
Ivan,
Good thoughts!
I think we have a some room to grow before we start strangling our high
quality bean supply.  But I suppose it could happen someday.  The Behemoth 
(ticker SBUX) actually produced good coffee in their early days.  In
many ways they declined due to their own success.  They can't possibly 
provide
best quality beans in the top few percentiles when they dominate so much of
the market.  Their size drove them to mediocrity.  If homeroasting were to
expand to even 1% of coffee drinkers, we'd have a rough time getting the
kind of beans Tom now provides.  Apart from the list, how many homeroasters
do you know?  I don't know a single one!  There are about 600 people where I
work.  Of course I don't know all of them, but the aroma of homeroast would
have tattled on any homeroasters.  I'd have smelled homeroast a mile away. 
So I'm
guessing non of my co-workers are homeroasters.  One out of 600 - a fraction
of a percent.  Most folks don't even get it.  They look at me strangely when
I tell them of my affliction.  "You do what?  Is it as good as Starbucks?"
Arghh...  That's usually about as far as it goes.  Even if I were to provide
them with some beans, they'd want me to grind them first or they'd run them
through a whirly-blade and make a weak brew with low-temperature water from
a drip pot.  They really don't get it.  So as far as evangelism, I don't
try.  And I think we're safe for quite a while.
Bob
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3) From: Vicki Smith
Then again, in my small office (12 people) we have three home roasters.
v
Bob Hazen wrote:
<Snip>
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4) From: Bob Hazen
That's quite a number!  How many were roasters before you arrived?  Were you 
instrumental in their conversion?  Must be great to be able to "speak the 
language" with them.
Bob
<Snip>
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5) From: Jesse Van Der Molen
Here in central Iowa, I found out about 2
home-roasters after I bought my behmor at the
beginning of the year. One built one out of his gas
grill, and the other has a small roaster that he
bought from SM a few years back. One goes to my
church, and one was my brother's roommate in college.
So, I wonder, there are two that I've known for some
time, but didn't know they home roast. Both of these
are in the same grouping of churches as myself. Would
there be such a high percentage in the broader
population? Who knows.
Jesse T. Van Der Molen
"As virtue increases, so does the temptation to Pride"
Lewis, the Pilgrim's Regress
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6) From: Vicki Smith
I've told this story before, but I roasted coffee for my boss during my 
job interview. He called and asked to meet with me, but wasn't really 
sure he had a job available that was a match for my qualifications. He 
suggested meeting for coffee, so I asked him to come to my house (coffee 
in Red Deer, Alberta leaves something to be desired).
One thing led to another, and we ended up in my garage roasting in my 
bread machine. He was my first convert. We added a third person into the 
mix a few weeks ago. The husband of another co-worker started roasting 
last fall, but I wasn't sure if I should count him or not, though I was 
the one who introduced it to him.
v
Bob Hazen wrote:
<Snip>
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7) From: Jay Bradshaw
I only know of one other homeroaster, a physician friend who introduced me
to it.  Since then, I have shared roasted beans with lots of folks, but only
recent got a bite from our attorney, who was impressed enough to go out out
and found a Poppery to give it a whirl.  I also gave her a starter sampler
pack and the link to the SM pages.  Even her husband (affectionately known
as "Mr. Maxwell House") has become a believer.
Other than these two, I don't know of anyone else in the office, within our
department (we're a state agency), or in the state, who roasts.  ;-)
Jay
(Maine)
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8) From: Derek Bradford
I know four other homeroasters.  Two I turned on to roasting, the other two
came to it on their own (one through a landlord who did it herself, and the
other began some decades ago I believe).  I suppose my grandparents were
once homeroasters, but that's a different story.
Personally, I don't really bother trying to get people on board much; most
people just don't care, and there's no point in bothering them.  They like
my coffee when they have it, and that's good enough for me.  It's all even,
though.  I don't have a car, let alone a decked-out super car, I don't have
a big screen plasma TV, and my clothes are all used.  We all have our vices,
and if I'm not going to listen to any of those people, why should they
listen to me?
--Derek
On Wed, May 14, 2008 at 6:49 PM, Jay Bradshaw  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Every path but your own is the path of fate. --Thoreau
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9) From: Sheila Quinn
I'd say 1/100% or less are homeroasters, but even that number is 
probably too high! I know of one other in my city because he came up to 
me before a meeting and mentioned an article I wrote about it for my 
magazine. I got a phone call from someone else about how to do it with a 
popper, but I don't know whether or not she ever tried it. Perhaps 
others checked into it after that article, but I have no idea.
Someone mentioned that I should do a class for adult education here (I 
suppose similar to Ed's class), but I'm not sure I'm ready for that. 
Getting up in front of people makes me too nervous!
I don't think increasing the number of homeroasters will hurt our supply 
because it isn't likely to increase by huge numbers. As you said, this 
is the age of convenience, and most people simply think it's too much 
trouble. They might search out higher quality roasted beans once they 
taste really good coffee, but they won't bother to do their own.
Sheila
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10) From: Bill
In college I used to invite all my friends over once a week.  I'd make a big
pot of soup and a few loaves of fresh bread.  We'd enjoy a good meal and
good times.  I really like to do things for other people that will bring
them enjoyment.
Coffee is the same thing.  People like the coffee I provide for them, and
that makes me glad.  I know a dentist in town who's pretty interested in
roasting his own.  In a few months, probably...  Otherwise, I've introduced
2 others in Cheyenne to roasting, and I have a few people who are
interested...
But like Tom has said, it takes a peculiar person to homeroast.  Gotta be
willing to invest the time and energy into it.  Gotta enjoy the details.
 Lots of people don't.
I talk about fresh coffee at every opportunity, and I give out homeroast as
a gift.  But that's about it.  Not everyone's gonna be interested...
And my family is jealous that I get to drink my phenomonal coffee every day.
 wooO!
bill in wyo
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11) From: Barry Luterman
Two of my 4 children are home roasters now. One of the other two does
not drink coffee and the other one thinks my stuff is every bit as
good as *$
On Tue, May 13, 2008 at 6:44 PM, Jesse Van Der Molen  wrote:
<Snip>
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12) From: Bob
I've converted my son and a pair of cousins (they got a popper 
and a sample box from SweetMarias for birthdays a while back). 
Nobody at my office/garage, but several customers buying from me 
now. Not sure if I want to convert them.
Bob in Parker CO
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13) From: Warren and Carolyn
I had to say something about this. I have been homeroasting for 20 
years, in that time I have only converted 1 person into a regular 
homeroaster. I have  bought roaster as gifts for people who said they 
were interested, and the roaster was left unused. My first machine 
roaster- a miraculous little Melitta (which defied every prediction and 
lasted for 5 years of thrice-weekly roasting) was given away to someone- 
when still working perfectly-who never used it.  (I only gave it away 
because I was moving to England and figured that even with the best 
transformer, the thing would blow out.
My one convert was a pianist friend who was staying with us when she was 
soloing with my orchestra. She did the usual rave about my coffee, I did 
my usual go-on-line show-her-the-SweetMaria-site shtick and gave her my 
speech about how with a FreshRoast you would have coffee in hardly more 
time than it takes to boil water.  And then I forgot about it.  I was 
shocked when she e-mailed me a few months later with some specific 
questions about roasting and telling me she was still trying to figure 
out the i Roast. By the way, I don't think I can take all the credit 
even in this one case. She was working at that time with a very well 
known violinist who is also a homeroaster, and I am sure he had an 
influence as well.
People are always dropping in to have my coffee, and I get coffee 
requests all the time, but somehow people think it is just my thing, and 
never actually get it together to do it themselves. And they think I am 
really weird,and my protestations of the logic of homeroasting seem to 
make no sense to them.
What is interesting is that I still get no interest from anyone, even 
though homeroasting today is way easier than it was when I started. I 
was living in Honolulu then, and could not get any green beans 
locally-although I would get them when visiting the Big Island- and I 
was getting green beans sent to me from Peet's! About 1990 I got a 
letter-I think it was from Jim Reynolds-saying that they would not sell 
me green beans anymore because the Peet's identity was in the roast. 
True enough. But I can vouch that they actually used good beans, despite 
the roast. Their beans used tasted pretty good in a lighter roast as 
well.  I was roasting in the oven until I got the Melitta in 1990-there 
were so few options then. Things have changed, but it is still a 
marginal activity of a few strange people.
I think Ken Davids is right when he said that homeroasting can never be 
all that mainstream. I am not really sure why, but I have long 
experience proving his point!
Warren
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14) From: Bill
Warren, great post.  Love the reminiscences, but i think my favorite thing
is that you used to buy greens from peets, and that they were pretty good.
 That's great.
I think I read something from Tom on the list regarding the Behmor... didn't
he say that some of the appliance companies jumped into the homeroasting
market thinking that it was on the verge of taking off, only to be deeply
disappointed?  And that they don't want Sweet Maria's to balloon in
popularity, just small growth...???
Anyway, I agree that while homeroasting is easier and more people are
probably doing it, it probably will never be a mainstream pastime...
Again, thanks for the memories.  Happy roasting!
bill in wyo
On Wed, May 14, 2008 at 8:45 PM, Warren and Carolyn  wrote:
<Snip>
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15) From: Brandon Kolbe
Hi Warren,
    I enjoyed your viewpoint on the aspect of homeroasting.  I also seem to
find many people that enjoy my coffee but seem to view home roasting as "too
much work".  Most of the time it is never said directly but I seem to get
that impression.  My take on most people's coffee habits...  Most people say
they like coffee.  They drink it everyday no matter how it tastes.  I am
inclined to believe that they drink coffee more for the caffeine than the
flavor.  This really seems to be true for all the people that drink the
vending machine coffee in the building where I work.  I have tasted the
vending machine coffee.  It makes MickeyD's coffee taste fabulous.  I am
also surprised at how many people would rather spend $1 to $5 per drink at a
coffee shop than spend the few cents it costs per cup to roast your own at
home and enjoy a much more flavorful beverage.  Well, anyway I seem to be
rambling on a bit here.  Anyway, I just roasted some Ethiopia Organic
Yirgacheffe, India Mallali Estate Tree Dried Natural, and some Mexico
Chiapas La Union Coop.  When I am brewing a cup at work everyone who smells
my coffee can only dream of having such a wonderful brew!!!
Cheers,
Brandon
------------------------------- snip -------------------------------------
On Wed, May 14, 2008 at 9:45 PM, Warren and Carolyn  wrote:
<Snip>
------------------------------- snip -------------------------------------
-- 
"We are what we think.
All that we are arises
With our thoughts.
With our thoughts,
We make our world."
-- Buddha
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16) From: raymanowen
"...Davids is right when he said that homeroasting can never be all that
mainstream. I am not really sure why..."
Convenience, or, as was the subject of an assigned CEEB argument,
Convention. I purposely obscured my use of "convention," and still they let
me in. Homeroasting is no longer conventional, and is a touch inconvenient.
One throws control away when he opts for convenience.
Adhering to old definitions and standards of coffee roasting blocks any
advance in the art. Two well-known chains tend to produce a dark roast.
Their coffees have a monumental taste difference, and if I'm going out with
friends for coffee, we'll pass 14 of the one in deference to the one that
isn't in grocery and book stores like the Nobleman's Barn.
My Wednesday evening brew (WEB) is Costa Rica Naranjo Caracol Peaberry at 60
hours' rest. Mmmm- this is good stuff in a Steinway.
I can be a coffee snob at my own roaster or even when breaking my expresso
machine, doing things with it that it shouldn't do. The Arschloch aspect is
pretty simple.
Iechyd da, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
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17) From: raymanowen
"What would be the overall advantages and disadvantages of increasing the
number of homeroasters?
*{A*sk yourself,
"What form of Charity do you think is on the minds of the current coffee
farmers, to keep them and their families near the very bottom of living
standards so that a few rich consumers can push buttons and play fiddles?"
Would you [We] do it and subject our families to it for 5 years? 20 years?
While we practically give our crops to some ingrates that might whine about
pushing the rong button.*}*
No guaranteed education for your kids, no union pay scale, no 2 cars and a
Land Barge in the garage or even flush toilets. You really imagine we'll
have this largesse handed to us and several times more comsumers when We
find out that We can grow this funny little weed Much more easily for one
Hell of a lot more cash?
I fear we're on borrowed time, living in Dream Land right now. Get Serious.
Think about it -RayO, aka Opa!
[Aside from the clear advantage of increasing business for everybody's
favorite green coffee vendor, our host, how does it help? I remember reading
something that claimed our ability to get great beans depends on the rest of
the world drinking the poor quality beans--a kind of bourgeois coffee class
depending on a  proletariat coffee class.]"
On Tue, May 13, 2008 at 9:53 PM, sci  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
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18) From: Morris Nelson
We live in a society (world) that doesn't know slow down to "smell the
coffee".  Grocery stores are 98% filled with packaged food with bad grease
or refined sugar as the main ingredient, yet don't sell cigarettes because
they are "bad for us".  All this happened when industrialization kicked into
high gear and coffee was put in a tin can to save time so we could work
harder.
Many of you find creative ways to roast that I would never consider.  And
you enjoy the experience.  I think home roast is the best kept secret that
is being told by the dozens of small coffee shops around the country.  And
for the most part, that's where it will stop. 
Morris

19) From: Dave Huddle
Warren,
Very interesting comments.
I got one co-worker interested in home roasting, but he didn't stick with it.
'My one convert was a pianist friend who was staying with us when she
was soloing with my orchestra.'
Please tell us about your orchestra.   Where, etc....
Long ago and far away in another life, I played in an orchestra to
help pay my college bills.  Now, I find that I'm more valuable to the
music world by sitting out front and applauding.
Dave
Westerville, OH
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20) From: Dean De Crisce
Hey Ivan...
For whatever reason I have no interest to convert people. A very few that I know love their coffee...i talk to them about this (like three people...one I got a subscription to toms roasted coffee). The rest...why throw pearls to swine?
I live in nyc...the capital of swill from side street bagel stands. Everyone here takes coffee with heavy milk and sugar. Cafe con leche. This kind of hobby requires effort and drive that few people have. 
I was turned on by a brief discussion with a collegue who was doing it. He just told me how different an experience he had with his roasted coffee compared to the average burnt rubber. He turned me on to the SM site...which I followed up cause I was intrigued...after a two minute conversation. I thanked him later.
Dean De Crisce
Sent from a Treo phone.

21) From: Justin Marquez
I have pretty much given up on converting people to homeroasting.  Our craft
is much like making artisan bread. How many folks bake their own bread?
Probably about the same percentage as those of us who roast our own coffee.
(Probably some of the folks do both in appreciation of the finer quality!)
When folks ask me why I go to all that bother to roast my own coffee, I
explain that it is like the difference between mass-produced cello-wrapped
bread from Wonder Bread (or whoever) and homebaked artisan bread. If you
want that level of quality and taste, you either pay a higher price to buy
it (IF you can find it) or learn to do it yourself.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On Thu, May 15, 2008 at 1:53 AM,  wrote:
<Snip>
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22) From: Jim and Tina Wheeler
I have to agree with Justin.  We roast our own coffee and bake our own bread
because we prefer the higher quality.  Of the four neighbors who live within
five miles of us, only one other has taken up home roasting.  Most people
can taste the difference, but don't care to go to the extra trouble for the
quality.
Even so, we are always ready to show others how to roast coffee.  After all,
it is easier than baking your own bread.
-- 
Jim in Skull Valley
On Thu, May 15, 2008 at 9:12 AM, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
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23) From: sci
Dean, et.al.,
I had a similar conversion experience to homeroasting.
Central Mexico, Huasteca region, coffee country, lives as an enchanted land
in my adolescent memory. Hundreds of small coffee farms dotted the
mountainous landscape. I drank lots of really homemade coffee, coffee
roasted on open fires on homemade clay griddles, grown on the mountain
behind the house, brewed in open pots, slaking my thirst on this jungle
brew. Across the dusty plaza in Taman, a town of 1,000 on the banks of the
Montezuma, a local roaster fired up his drums about 6am every morning, and I
awoke to the pungent fresh aroma about 7. Smells evoke memories more than
any other sense. Coffee is deeply seated in my psyche. I can't explain it.
Must be the REM moments while I was smelling the fresh roasting aroma coming
across the plaza.
Those early coffee memories haunted me. I loved coffee, and I loved the
people who grew coffee; they are the nicest people I've ever known; really
poor people have killed one of their last scrawny chickens to feed this
gringo; humbling. I had one farmer friend who sold me 20 kilos of his own
specially prepared beans, still in parchment. I paid him above market price.
This was 1982. I took them to the roaster who hulled, roasted and ground all
of it (yea, not kosher). I gave most of it to family. Back then, nobody I
knew even ground their own beans. But it was special because I knew the man
who grew it; I knew the earth that nourished it; I swam in the river next to
the farm. I knew the man who roasted it.
I spent 25 years of coffee soul searching: charbucks, 8 oclock beans, 2 lb
club bags, Peet's beans, a good, but not so local roaster, and doing
everything I could to get a better cup of coffee. One day, a student of mine
strolls into class and we start talking coffee. A couple of weeks later he
said he wanted to start homeroasting. I immediately queried "Where can I get
the green beans?" He said he had heard that we could get them from
SweetMarias. As soon as class was over, I went straight to my office and
spent at least 2 hours solid immersed in SM's website. AHHH! It was a
Eureka! moment. This is what I had wanted for years, but assumed it was
impossible. I didn't hesitate to jump in head first. I wanted to get back to
what I had known in Mexico. Since then, I've been an evangelist for
homeroasting. There are three others roasting around here that I know of,
but I don't "claim" them as converts, though I influenced them.
If there were more homeroasters, it would be good for everyone involved,
from the farmer, to the vendor (SM), to us. Of course it can't be
mainstream. But there's an economic and practical sweet spot. If SM could
sell more great beans, they could buy/offer more great lots. This is good
for SM, good for us, good for the farmers. I truly appreciate that SM helps
farmers more than FT. Happy farmers grow better beans. It would also be good
for equipment manufacturers like Hearthware and Behmor. More units sold
means more R&D for better future machines. Personally, I also like having
somebody else around with whom I can share homeroasting experiences. We also
buy beans for each other anytime we place an order. It's like anything else,
cooperation increases efficiencies. I'd love to start a local consortium or
club. [Anybody else here in the Raleigh, NC area? Anybody know how to do
this well?]
Ya'll corroborate my evangelistic experience: most people simply don't care;
they think coffee is for caffeine delivery only; they don't see the point,
think I have too much time on my hands; they have been conditioned by years
of horrid office coffee and *$ to think that dark roast is the ultimate;
they spend $20 a week at *$. I had my closest friend deeply insult me one
day (the way only close friends can). I had a thermos full of a very nice
Yirg. I have him some, and seriously said it reminded him of "airplane
coffee." All I can say is his tongue must be ruined by 40 years of being
conditioned by skunkwater coffee.
Question:
Do you think that the simple name "HOMEroasting" is hurting the movement,
giving the wrong perception?
Why do I ask? Because, unfortunately HOME has come to mean something
substandard to many people. Homeschooling gets a bad rap. Sometimes homemade
means below par. Home isn't a nice place for lots of people. I love home,
but perceptions are hard to change, names aren't.
Artisan Bread? Artisan Coffee? Gourmet is passe. Micro Brewery for beer.
Maybe Micro Roastery for coffee?
Any thoughts anybody?
Ivan
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Date: Thu, 15 May 2008 05:59:24 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Dean De Crisce" 
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Homeroasting Evangelism
To: homeroast
Message-ID: <482c33ac.4201360a.2663.1fdc>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1"
Hey Ivan...
For whatever reason I have no interest to convert people. A very few that I
know love their coffee...i talk to them about this (like three people...one
I got a subscription to toms roasted coffee). The rest...why throw pearls to
swine?
I live in nyc...the capital of swill from side street bagel stands. Everyone
here takes coffee with heavy milk and sugar. Cafe con leche. This kind of
hobby requires effort and drive that few people have.
I was turned on by a brief discussion with a collegue who was doing it. He
just told me how different an experience he had with his roasted coffee
compared to the average burnt rubber. He turned me on to the SM site...which
I followed up cause I was intrigued...after a two minute conversation. I
thanked him later.
Dean De Crisce
Sent from a Treo phone.

24) From: Bob Hazen
Great post Ivan!  In my minds eye, I can see a younger Ivan being steeped in 
coffee culture.  It's a part of you.  I can see you making your way through 
the obstacle course to great coffee.  But it seems you've arrived.
Apologies to the list; I quoted Ivan's entire email.  I wouldn't want 
somebody searching the archives to miss this great tale.
As for a name, I don't think we're big enough yet to be called 
micro-roasters.  Perhaps nano- or pico-roasters.
Bob

25) From: John Despres
I have two converts to my credit. One of them tasted my home roast and =
bought a roaster within a few weeks. The other, a guest director for a =
show I was working on bought a Fresh Roast 8 from SM for her husband as =
a birthday gift. Billy says it's the best gift she's ever given him! =
Hopefully, he'll join the list soon. I'm working on another convert as well.
As to others who've tasted my fresh roasts, all love it and a few even =
buy the occasional half pound from me but the others just make happy =
noises and go back their own routines.
I'm involved in a very small way with a fresh roast start up cafe. Kurt =
has a 5 pound roaster and is roasting daily and supplying a few =
restaurants. He loves the idea of home roasting and soon I will be doing =
Saturday morning demonstrations which should be tons of fun.
It's all fun!
John
sci wrote:
<Snip>
ng
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of
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up
<Snip>
e.com
<Snip>
/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
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-- =
John A C Despres
Hug your kids
616.437.9182
Scene It All Productions 
JDs Coffee Provoked Ramblings =
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26) From: webviking6
My sister homeschools her children and while I personally think that she 
does a far better job teaching her children than the state could ever 
do, I agree that the term "homeschooling" has a negative tinge to it 
that carries over to the term "homeroasting."  So does the term 
"homemade," for that matter and now that I think of it, maybe that's 
where the root of negativity comes from.  "Homemade" just isn't as good 
as "store bought" in a lot of peoples minds.  Maybe it's the consumer 
culture.  Whatever.
"Artisan coffee" is a better term, so is "fresh roasted" although that 
doesn't imply that you roasted it yourself the way "homeroasted" does.
I don't know what the answer is, but from what little I know of roasting 
so far, I think that there's likely to be a large variation in the 
quality of coffee you get from people that homeroast.  Some of that is 
good and by design, you should buy the beans that appeal to you and 
roast your coffee the way it appeals to you.  But coffee roasting, 
especially single origin beans that vary widely in characteristics from 
farm to farm, or even season to season, is as much an art as it is 
science.  So there's going to be a wide variation in the coffee that 
comes from home roasters, so will do better than others, and that adds 
to the perception that you can't trust what you are going to get when 
someone hands you a cup of homeroasted coffee.
Of course you could say the same thing about a home cooked meal, but 
that term has an aura of quality all it's own.  I don't think the term 
"homeroasted" will ever leave its associated aura of "clunkiness" or 
whatever you want to call it behind, as long as homeroasters are so few 
and far between.
Personally, I don't care.  As long as I can find the beans, and get the 
roast right enough to make a cup of coffee I can truly enjoy, savor and 
share with my friends and family who can appreciate it, I'm happy.
sci wrote:
<Snip>
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27) From: Lynne
ivan -
getting caught up on back emails caused by too much work and [now] my
fractured elbow. actually, the injury is giving me an excuse to spend more
time reading...
i thoroughly enjoyed all you wrote! how i wish i had that experience - it
truly sounds enchanted, in the way i would define 'enchanted.'
thanks for sharing this...
lynne
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