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Topic: Milwaukee 8986, was Bread machine, heat gun, (17 msgs / 432 lines)
1) From: Brian Kamnetz
I too am interested in hearing about your experiences with the 8988.
Brian
On Thu, May 15, 2008 at 10:30 PM, Bill  wrote:
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2) From: K W Matley
Well, so far my experience is that I got email this morning informing me
that delivery of the Milwaukee 8988 will be postponed about a week. Not sure
whether to cancel the order and try somewhere else or just wait it out.
Fortunately I have a couple weeks' supply of backup coffee in the freezer.
I'll post my reaction to the 8988 when I've had a chance to use it.
Ken
On 5/16/08, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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3) From: raymanowen
Just doing a little clicking around, I've found the 8986-20 for $75; the
dual temperature model
is made in Germany for $66, and a different model has a 5 year warranty.
This is not to say that only one model is made in Germany or that only one
other has the 5 year warranty, but for $75, I can get 3 Wagner HT-1000's,
made in China, with infinite heat control (true of Any heat gun), with a
cumulative 6 year warranty.
The alleged temperature readout is probably a lie, and for just $10.25 more,
you can have the lie extended to the .01 degree range of useless data.
The thermostat on your wall does not indicate the temperature of the cold
air output of the air conditioning or hot air from the furnace, nor would
you care. What's comfortable for humans in the domicile is your only
concern.
Ditto the coffee bean target of the heat gun. The goal is to get them
beautifully roasted, not necessarily how you achieve the profile. A fixed
thermocouple of any type in the beans could indicate the profile, not the
exact temperature.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
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4) From: Dave Kvindlog
I recently upgraded from a Wagner HT-1000, borrowed from Brett Mason, to a
Milwukee 8986-20.  There was a HUGE difference in the quality of the roast.
Much better airflow that helped get the heat distributed more evenly amongst
the beans.  I considered the 8988 and the price made me ask hard questions.
I wondered if the digital temp would improve my temp control to an extent
that would make much of a difference.  I finally decided that I am the best
temp control with this roasting method.  I can vary the distance, airflow,
and temperature real-time as needed, watching and listening to the roast and
responding accordingly.
I'm VERY pleased with the 8986-20.  Pricey?  Perhaps.  But I think in this
case you get what you pay for.
-- 
Dave Kvindlog
iHomeroast
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
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5) From: Vicki Smith
I just saw this for ~$75 on Amazon (Deal Monger). Is that the price you 
can usually find it for or is it a good enough deal that I should have 
one shipped to my son for collection at a later date?
v
Dave Kvindlog wrote:
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6) From: Bill
I got mine from Deal Monger on ebay.  about 70...  Very happy with it.  Does
a great job.  I thought that you were getting sweet HGs from canadian
tire...?
bill in wyo
On Sun, May 18, 2008 at 4:12 PM, Vicki Smith  wrote:
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7) From: Vicki Smith
Yup, I have, but I also have 16 coffee pots of various kinds. It never 
hurts to try something that is highly recommended, if you can get it at 
the right price. Currently I have only one backup heat gun yanno ;).
v
Bill wrote:
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8) From: Dave Kvindlog
Got mine from Deal Monger (through Amazon) for $74.89 with free shipping.
What a difference it made with my roasts!  It IS heavier however.  The only
downside of more power.
Have fun with yours!
Dave
-- 
Dave Kvindlog
iHomeroast
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
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9) From: Brian Kamnetz
Dave,
You mention that the 8986 is heavier than you Wagner. Can you tell me
the weight of the 8986?
Thanks,
Brian
On Sun, May 18, 2008 at 10:42 PM, Dave Kvindlog  wrote:
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10) From: Bill
Not Dave, but it's listed on Amazon at 2.9 lbs.  I remember weighing mine
after I got it and it was somewhere right around there...  so lighter than
the Master HG you use, Brian.  But isn't the wattage on the 8986 lower than
the HG you're using?
bill in wyo
On Mon, May 19, 2008 at 8:21 AM, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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11) From: Brian Kamnetz
Bill,
Yes, my Master Appliance 751b draws 14.5 amps, and that comes out to
around 1740 watts. Justin told me once how to calculate BTUs, but I
can't find that post and don't remember. Bottom line is that the 751b
puts out LOTS of BTUs. On the other hand, it weighs nearly 4 pounds,
and has a very long handle so there is lots of leverage. For me it was
a bear to hold during the roast, but I now suspend it during roasting,
so for practical reasons it is now weightless for roasting. It's hard
to imagine more reserve heat for roasting.
Brian
On Mon, May 19, 2008 at 12:07 PM, Bill  wrote:
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12) From: Dave Kvindlog
I'm away on travel to DC, but as I remember it, my 8986-20 puts out 1100 F
and ~16 CFM max.  There are three fan speeds and three heat settings.  I
believe it is the same as the 8988 described below, but without the digital
readout:
Milwaukee Heat Guns Variable Temperature Heat Gun, 90 F to 1050 F, wi=
th
LED Digital Readout Display This variable temperature Heat Gun offers a
range from 90 to 1050 degrees Fahrenheit. The LED digital readout display
allows you to monitor the temperature via a digital display when precision
control is needed. Three controlled air volumes, 7.06/8.83/15.89 cu.ft.min.,
allow you to match the air speed to your application. The first stage air
volume does not include heat for cooling applications. Features Ceramic
encapsulated heating element for maximum tool life LED Digital Readout
Display shows present temperature in increments of 10 F One hand operati=
on
with lightweight and easy grip handle Upright stationary use with pads on
back cap and lower handle Removable air filter keeps debris out
Specifications Voltage 120 AC Amps 12.5 Air Temperatures 90 F/1,050 F=
 Air
Volume 8.8 cu. ft. min. Length 11-1/2 in. Tool Weight 2.0 lbs. Shipping
Weight 2.8 lbs....
-- =
Dave Kvindlog
iHomeroast
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
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13) From: K W Matley
I finished the last of my fresh roasted coffee this morning and this =
evening when I got home the new heat gun was waiting for me on the =
porch.
The Milwaukee 8988-20 is maybe a bit lighter than my MHT 750, no more =
than an ounce or two in my estimate. It's several inches longer, and =
lacks some of the well-placed protuberances that allowed me to rest the =
MHT on the edge of the bread machine and maintain my distance from the =
beans without effort. A major plus is that the air intake is way in the =
back of the gun, and it has a filter. I think chaff sucked into the =
intake is what might have killed the MHT.
Starting it up, it is *much* quieter than the MHT. This is nice, as =
I've had difficulty hearing second crack since I added the bread =
machine. I can't tell for sure, but I think that the MHT put out a lot =
more airflow. =
The temperature control on the 8988 might be infinite. It's really hard =
to tell, because it spans the whole range from 90-1050F in about 1/2 =
inch (it's a slider). Can't tell if it is notched, or just not too =
smooth. The temp display is supposed to be accurate to 10 degrees, but =
I had difficulty  making adjustments that fine. =
The old MHT 750 had one fan speed, and temperature was adjusted by =
opening or closing a baffle, allowing more or less air to pass through. =
The disadvantage to this was that higher temperatures were achieved at =
a sacrifice of airflow. I usually roasted at the highest airflow, =
making temperature adjustments by adjusting distance. The Milwaukee has =
two fan speeds, and claims to adjust the temperature so that it remains =
constant at different airflows. This might be useful.
I roasted another pound of El Salvador Matalapa Estate this evening. It =
took me longer to get to 300 degrees than I would have liked, but I got =
to first crack in about 9 minutes, well within my usual practice. I had =
a little difficulty maintaing my temperature, as measured with my IR =
thermometer, but I reached second crack at about 12 minutes. With the =
MHT I was able to cool the roast to 300 within about 3 minutes. The =
8988 took a bit longer, but not too much longer. From the looks of the =
beans, I overshot my goal of FC verging on FC+ by just a little bit.
So at this point I'm unsure about the Milwaukee. I was hoping the =
digital temp readout would give me a way of reproducing roasts more =
consistently, but don't have a good feeling of whether this will be the =
case. I'm reminded of playing a good, but unfamiliar musical =
instrument. If you're competent, you can deliver an acceptable =
performance, but you can't really make the new instrument sing until =
you've learned  it's particular strengths and weaknesses. I roasted a =
pound of coffee this evening that looks to be quite acceptable. The =
next roasts will tell if I can make the Milwaukee sing.
On Mon, 19 May 2008 23:54:49 -0500, Dave Kvindlog wrote:
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with
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n.,
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tion
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 F Air
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14) From: Bill
Took a while to get the 8986 zeroed in using a new BM.  had gotten good with
the DB, but the BM has smaller surface area, so it absorbs the heat
differently.
Anyway, here's my generic style of roasting... 5 minutes at the slot between
3 and 4 (out of 5) on the adjuster.  That puts me to 250 in 5 minutes.  Then
I kick it up to 4.5 for the next 5-7 minutes (depends on the bean).  First
crack at 10 or 12 minutes.  I adjust the HG at some point to give me the
roast I'm looking for (if I'm stopping at City or C+, I back the heat back
to 3.5 at 390 F)...    Anyway, seems to work pretty well for most roasts.
The red heat slider is not notched, but the blue airflow adjuster is.  I
only roast on the highest fan setting.
Did I understand you correctly, you cool using the HG?  Hadn't really
thought of that...
Rinse the chaff collector (I mean HG air filters) regularly.  The real fine
chaff will gum it up.
I really like the 8986, but I have nothing to compare it to...
Looking forward to more reports.
bill in wyo
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15) From: K W Matley
Yeah, the old heat gun put out a lot of air and cooled very quickly. I could
easily cool a roast down with it. I'd always wondered why people have
separate fan setups for cooling. With the Milwaukee's lower airflow, I might
soon be one of the roasters with a separate fan, too.
The Matalapa Estate I roasted on Tuesday turned out perfect! I thought I'd
overshot the mark a bit with the slower cooling, but it's just what I was
shooting for.
Ken
On 5/20/08, Bill  wrote:
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16) From: Brian Kamnetz
The cooling issue is interesting, often discussed here on the list.
Some people see cooling as part of the roast, a stage that can be
profiled in order to attain desired flavor characteristics. Other
people see cooling as nothing more than stopping the roast as quickly
as possible.
Brian
On 5/22/08, K W Matley  wrote:
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17) From: raymanowen
"Other people see cooling as [nothing more than] stopping the roast as
quickly as possible."
Nothing more than?
I'm one of the others that believe that roasting and cooling are congruent.
Roasting of the coffee beans does not take place until Heat is added to the
coffee beans.
The latest edition of *Rocket Science* states editorially that roasting
continues until the heat is removed. Published by Dr. Robert Goddard in Sci
Am in 1919.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Got grinder?
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