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Topic: Moka Pot Madness (5 msgs / 201 lines)
1) From: sci
The mad coffee scientist (aka "coffee witch-cult member," according to my
wife) has been at work.
Here's my latest experiment and it has yielded an interesting result.
Take a Chemex filter (Melitta can be substituted) and cut it to the diameter
of the Moka Pot portafilter. Just turn the filter over and trace a light
pencil line around the filter onto the paper, then cut a bit larger. I
placed the paper filter over the grounds on the Moka Pot and screwed that
puppy down real tight. Apply heat. Wait for brew. The Timing on the brew
came out the same as usual.
Now the cup quality emerged as silky and thick, but slicker body, with less
bite, less edge, but still Moka pot strong. Compare it to the difference
between FP and AP with AP being smoother.
Try it on your next Moka brew.
It's not an everyday thing, but once you've tried it, it is worth the small
trouble.
I used a Brazil pulped natural at C+ ground to finer than drip.
Another secret coffee ritual from the
Mad, mad, mad, mad world of coffee,
Ivan
(Coffee witch in residence)
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2) From: Bill
Ivan,
could you please speak about the absence or presence of coffee oils?  B/c
with the Moka Pot oils are more present, aren't they?  I've never used the
moka pot, so I don't know...
thanks!
bill in wyo
On Thu, Jun 12, 2008 at 6:22 PM, sci  wrote:
<Snip>
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3) From: Tim TenClay
On Thu, Jun 12, 2008 at 8:22 PM, sci  wrote:
[snip]
<Snip>
OK... I've been waiting to give this a try.  I didn't use a Chemex
filter, but used an AP filter instead (it's "naturally" cut a little
bigger than my Mokka Pot, but I didn't have to trim it.  Here's what I
noticed:
  1) The brew seemed a little "thinner" -- i.e. I usually can't see
the bottom of the Mokka pot when there's about 1 cm of brew in it...
it took a little longer for me to stop seeing the bottom.
  2) The "crema" (I know, it's not technically crema, but you know
what I mean) seemed to take longer to start, but it ended up being a
little richer and when it did start, seemed more espresso-like.
  3) There was less "bite" to the brew.  I'm kind-of a quantity guy;
although I like a good espresso, I usually make an americano (even
with my mokka pot) so that I can drink it longer.  I don't know that
this would make as good of a "Mokka Americano" but it's excellent by
itself -- indeed, I iced the one I brewed this way this morning and it
was exceptional.
  4) Like you, my brew took about the same time, it was exceptionally
flavored, and the brew DID seem slightly "silkier" (to use your
word).... It didn't seem to have quite the mouth feel though (I don't
know if that's the word I want... it seemed a little less viscous).
Thanks for the test... this one intrigued me... I'll do it again!
Oh, and to answer Bill's question: I DO normally see some oils in my
mokka brew, and this cut some of them out -- I'm not the most refined
palette, but I didn't find that it disturbed the flavor... rather, it
seems to have "rounded it out" a little... Does that make sense?
Grace and peace,
  `tim
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Blog:http://lexorandi.tenclay.orgen
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4) From: sci
Tim,
It sounds like we got nearly identical results. I've used both paper filters
and can't tell the difference much. Some find MP bitter. Maybe this is a fix
for some of that. It really seems to mellow out the harshness. There's a lot
more technique in MP brewing than people think. It's like other brew
methods. When you have made over 1000 pots/cups with a certain method, you
start to notice little things that make a difference. As for MP, I'm still
working toward my 1000th pot, but I've noticed that you want to keep heat
moderate and cut the heat ASAP after the brewed coffee stops gurgling out.
You can't just walk away in a "fire and forget" fashion.
Ivan
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++==
Date: Mon, 16 Jun 2008 11:23:27 -0400
From: "Tim TenClay" 
Subject: Re: [Homeroast] Moka Pot Madness
To: homeroast
Message-ID:
       <52916f760806160823u6b8c024ckc70b890b376eb96>
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetO-8859-1
On Thu, Jun 12, 2008 at 8:22 PM, sci  wrote:
[snip]
<Snip>
diameter
<Snip>
OK... I've been waiting to give this a try.  I didn't use a Chemex
filter, but used an AP filter instead (it's "naturally" cut a little
bigger than my Mokka Pot, but I didn't have to trim it.  Here's what I
noticed:
 1) The brew seemed a little "thinner" -- i.e. I usually can't see
the bottom of the Mokka pot when there's about 1 cm of brew in it...
it took a little longer for me to stop seeing the bottom.
 2) The "crema" (I know, it's not technically crema, but you know
what I mean) seemed to take longer to start, but it ended up being a
little richer and when it did start, seemed more espresso-like.
 3) There was less "bite" to the brew.  I'm kind-of a quantity guy;
although I like a good espresso, I usually make an americano (even
with my mokka pot) so that I can drink it longer.  I don't know that
this would make as good of a "Mokka Americano" but it's excellent by
itself -- indeed, I iced the one I brewed this way this morning and it
was exceptional.
 4) Like you, my brew took about the same time, it was exceptionally
flavored, and the brew DID seem slightly "silkier" (to use your
word).... It didn't seem to have quite the mouth feel though (I don't
know if that's the word I want... it seemed a little less viscous).
Thanks for the test... this one intrigued me... I'll do it again!
Oh, and to answer Bill's question: I DO normally see some oils in my
mokka brew, and this cut some of them out -- I'm not the most refined
palette, but I didn't find that it disturbed the flavor... rather, it
seems to have "rounded it out" a little... Does that make sense?
Grace and peace,
 `tim
--
The content of this e-mail may be private or of confidential nature.
Do not forward without permission of the original author.
--
Rev. Tim TenClay, NATA #253
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Blog:http://lexorandi.tenclay.orgen
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5) From: Tim TenClay
So True!!  I think the other thing that DRASTICALLY helped me was a
good pot.  I hadn't realized how much of a difference this made for me
until I got a new and bigger one (but not better) a few months ago.
The "floor" of the boiling chamber is too thin on the new pot and
doesn't regulate as well, whereas my "old" pot has a thicker bottom.
The brew on the newer one tends to spatter and be bitter when I try to
make it like my old one.  I still haven't gotten a good one out of it
yet.  Whereas the old pot repeatedly turns out exceptional results.
As for the 1000... I'm probably a little shy of that... I'm definitely
closer than I was several years ago!
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
On Tue, Jun 17, 2008 at 1:11 AM, sci  wrote:
<Snip>
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Do not forward without permission of the original author.
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Rev. Tim TenClay, NATA #253
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Blog:http://lexorandi.tenclay.orgHomeroast mailing list
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