HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: Re: peaches (10 msgs / 259 lines)
1) From: Sheila Quinn
No, but I used to have the best homegrown peaches right in my own yard 
out in California. I sure miss those!
Sheila
Sandy Andina wrote:
Don't want to start any fights here, but anyone ever taste a good ripe 
clingstone Willamette Valley, OR peach in early September? So sweet and 
juicy I had to stand over my hotel sink to eat it--then complement it 
with a terrific late harvest Oregon (same valley) Riesling and a handful 
of freshly picked and roasted locally grown hazelnuts!
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2) From: Robert Flanery
One thing I think we can all agree on is that nature does it best, and fresh
from the orchard is the way to go.  The same pretty much goes for any fruit
or vegetable croo.  I remember eating vegetables straight from the garden
that were picked and cooked within the hour.  A long way from store bought.
The best poduce will always be local grown and fresh from the fields.
And the tomatoes.  I don't know how to describe it if you have never
experienced it.  I used to take a salt shaker down into the bottom and eat
tomatoes straight off the vine in the evening light.  And every once in a
while strip down a pea pod and have them direct from mother vine...
I don't know if I am hungry or homesick now.
Rob
On Tue, Aug 5, 2008 at 4:17 AM, Sheila Quinn wrote:
<Snip>
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3) From: Gary Foster
On Aug 5, 2008, at 4:48 AM, Robert Flanery wrote:
<Snip>
My tomatoes are going crazy this year.  I know *exactly* what you are  
talking about, and when I was a boy I used to get whuppins for going  
out into the garden and "grazing" the tomatoes.
I'm 42 now, and I eat as many of them as I can without busting ;)
I have several different varieties going (including two different  
heirloom varieties) and enough tomatoes that my wife is canning the  
excess as stewed tomatoes or tomato sauce.  My CEO begs me to bring in  
more of them whenever he sees me, heh.
There is *nothing* like a vine-ripened home-grown fully organic tomato  
that is so sweet it's like eating tomato candy.
-- Gary F.
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4) From: Sandy Andina
In my Chicago lakefront neighborhood, it is nearly impossible to do  
this--we are so infested with squirrels that we must pick our tomatoes  
at the first spot of pink (or even while still fully green). I can't  
begin to tell you (without cussing up a blue streak) how often I've  
gone out to the backyard and found ripe tomatoes still on the vine or  
on the ground with ONE bite taken out of them.  We've tried wire  
tomato cages, old pantyhose, growing basil (which the rabbits eat) and  
habanero peppers, even sprinkling Squirrel-Away (an ultra-concentrated  
form of capsicum extracted from cayenne peppers), all to no avail.  We  
gave up on every crop this year but rhubarb (which will probably  
survive nuclear winter to provide food for cockroaches), black  
raspberries (which Bob eats, as soon as each one ripens, on his way to  
and from our garage) and Concord grapes (most of which get stolen by  
the birds before they get ripe enough for jelly--at least I get to  
harvest the leaves for dolmades and the dead vines for grilling  
steaks).  Thank goodness for the natural food store and summer  
Saturday farmer's market around the corner.
On Aug 5, 2008, at 11:37 AM, Gary Foster wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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5) From: Gary Foster
Ah I feel for you.  I'm able to let them fully vine ripen so they get  
that deep dark garnet color going on and the sugar content is through  
the roof.  Except for the Purple Cherokees and the Black Princes...  
those of course don't get red :)
The black prince is amazing, it's this deep dark chocolate brown with  
a little green crown and when you cut it in wedges it's this rich  
chocolate color shot through with green and it's SO amazing.  I  
average half a dozen tomatoes a day that are at the "pick me pick me  
pick me" stage, with the occasional bag buster day like saturday when  
I picked about 30 and still had about 50 on the vine at various stages  
of orange (and Lord knows how many green ones still).
My habaneros, jalapenos and bell peppers are doing moderately well,  
the broccoli was a bumper crop (long gone now) and so was the cabbage  
but the tomatoes have just gone completely nuts.
My chickens (I started a small backyard flock of 3 hens) should start  
laying in another month or so, and I'm looking forward to a nice  
omelette with homemade salsa heh.
The plums are done for the year, my wife canned a bumper crop of those  
this year, and the apricots also.  I think we won't get any figs this  
year, we trimmed the fig tree way back last year to get it back under  
control.  The asian pears are falling on the ground and I'm leaving  
most of them for the birds because we still have jars and jars of  
preserves from last year's crop.  The lemon tree is kinda psychotic  
and we end up with lemons mostly year round (sadly not myers lemons  
though).
Oh and my wife pulled another 20 lbs or so of honey out of the  
backyard beehive.  Not sure how much honey, it completely filled a  
five gallon jar.
Imagine what I could do with some real land instead of just a backyard/ 
side yard.  :)
Oh, and to bring it back on track, I got my shipment of Gesha lot #5  
from "some unnamed source" that I *also* preorded way back when long  
before Tom had it up on the site and I think I'll save it for when the  
chickens start laying.  Maybe I'll make a nice garden omelette with  
fresh tomatoes, jalapenos, green onions and cheddar cheese and top it  
off with the Gesha.
Life's been giving me lemons lately, so I'll take my small joys where  
I can.
-- Gary F.
On Aug 5, 2008, at 10:48 AM, Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>
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6) From: Brian Kamnetz
Anyone familiar with the Greg Brown song, "Canned goods"? From the
song: "My gramma takes a bit of summer and she puts it in a jar."
You can hear fragments (samples) from two albums on Amazon:http://www.amazon.com/One-Night-Live-Greg-Brown/dp/B00000IWMM/ref=sr_1_13?ieF8&s=music&qid17960677&sr=1-13http://www.amazon.com/Live-One-Greg-Brown/dp/B000001BAO/ref=sr_1_10?ieF8&s=music&qid17960614&sr=1-10
Brian
On Tue, Aug 5, 2008 at 2:08 PM, Gary Foster  wrote:
<Snip>
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7) From: Frank Parth
Sandy,
I can't offer any advice on the tomatoes, we lose a lot also as well as many/most of our figs to birds.
But for our grapes we cover them with netting and it does a good job keeping the birds out. We use to cover the 
figtreewith netting but it got too big.
Frank Parth
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8) From: Amy Bailey
My neighbor's squirrels eat their tomatoes while they are still green.  It
is a sad thing!  Maybe a hot pepper spray?  That you spray onto the fruit
after each rain, until you pick it?
            ---Amy
On 8/5/08, Frank Parth  wrote:
<Snip>
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9) From: Lynne
Gary -
I've been *so* behind in my email - but I had to respond, even though this
thread is almost a week old.
There is nothing like a fresh, garden tomato! I miss them so much - when I
had my own house (and the option of growing food), I had to resort to cherry
tomatoes. The summers have changed here in the Boston area so much since I
was a kid, that I found it impossible to grow the wonderful, huge heirloom
tomatoes I remember from my childhood - and I despise the flavorless
short-growing varieties that scientists have created. Those beauties need
more intense heat - I can't even imagine  how anything (besides slugs &
arthritic conditions) are growing this summer, with our near-daily
thunderstorms and only occasional hot days.
Mine (the cherry tomatoes ones I grew) even self seeded the year I put the
house up for sale - that's the kind of gardening I enjoy - totally lazy, let
the plants take care of themselves!
Ah - tomato candy! That's a perfect description...
Lynne
(am I getting so old I'm now longing for days of long ago???)
On Tue, Aug 5, 2008 at 12:37 PM, Gary Foster  wrote:
<Snip>
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10) From: Lynne
Amy -
Hot pepper spray might help - I love squirrels, but their 'ingenuity' is
probably the reason they are so unpopular with many!
I think that netted material they sell (I forgot what it's called - I used
to buy it mail-order) might help. Cayenne pepper sprinkled all around the
plants might work (interesting - birds don't have the senses that make them
feel hot pepper, so in turn, aren't harmed at all by this- which is
important, since birds keep the pest population down). Read that used coffee
grounds work, too (keeping back on subject, lol). Just make sure they don't
have any dogs in the yard, that would eat the (toxic to them) coffee.
Lynne
On Wed, Aug 6, 2008 at 10:11 AM, Amy Bailey  wrote:
<Snip>
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