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Topic: Soliciting input on general principles of roast (3 msgs / 112 lines)
1) From: Bill
Wow, ok, I'll resurrect another thread that's almost a month old.  I only
have 175 threads left to read before I'm done with my six month hiatus.
Anyway, I just want to second what Bear posted here.  If anyone is using a
roaster that has any ability to profile the roast, I would highly recommend
reading this thread.  Our own Farmroast chimes in repeatedly, and the
discussion moves twice to H-B and once to coffeed.com.  Anyway, there is
some really valuable information available on these pages that I haven't
seen before.  Definitely useful information.  I'm hoping to read it all a
few more times and then assimilate it into my roasts.
Thanks, Bear!  I see this is your only post.  I sure hope you're still on
this list, looks like your inquiring mind would be at home on this list.
bill in wyo
On Mon, Jul 28, 2008 at 11:19 AM, Bear F. Braumoeller wrote:
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2) From: Steve Carlson
I remember seeing threads in the past about the density of beans, and the
elevation of the plantations.  My recollection is that higher elevation
plantations will tend to produce a denser bean, and that denser beans tend
to want more heat.
I guess I have a general sense of bean density just by looking at it.  I
would say that Kenyan peaberries are denser that a Yemen Mokha Sanaani bean,
for example.  But my guess is there is some additional wisdom on this that
people might want to share.  Is there a way to tell if a bean is a "high
elevation" or "low elevation" bean, and how the bean sits on the density
spectrum?  How much hotter would you roast a dense bean than a less dense
bean?
I haven't really started playing with different temperature variations yet.
I"m still pretty new to this, and I'm currently focused on checking out the
different regions and seeing what I like and don't like (Ethiopians and
Yemens are high on my list, Indonesian coffees are funky (sometimes funky
good, sometimes funky bad), Kona has been underwhelming, and Centrals and
South Americans are pretty much terra incognita for me).  I haven't yet
focused in a particular bean and started optimizing the roast (beyond going
longer or shorter after first crack).   Would love more thoughts on this.
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3) From: Bill
Bruce,
It's been a while since I read Boot's articles, so take that with a grain of
salt.  The post from Jim Shulman (sp?) that John is quoting notes that a
commercial roaster uses heat differently than a home roaster.  So if Boot
recommends cutting the heat, does he mean a) cutting the heat input to the
roaster or b) reducing the environmental temp?  I suspect that he is
referring to heat input.  Commercial roasters in general (not that I have
ANY experience there) are much more sluggish in responding to heat than our
small home roasters.  They can cut heat input, which slows rise in
environmental temp.  If we cut heat input, we'll probably drop the
Environmental temp.  Someone just posted a great point about "parameters" to
the list that addresses this, that we don't have much excess capacity in our
systems.
So your question about P2... I had been wondering the exact same thing.  Two
questions: 1) is it true that cutting environmental temp around 1st crack
will adversely affect the beans?  2) Is that what p2 on the behmor does?
 the 2nd question is more easily verifiable.  I honestly have no where near
the experience to know if what Jim Shulman (sp?) posted in those discussions
is correct.  He certainly is very well respected, enough to make me modify
my roaster to do a few experiments.
And so I'm moving in a few directions on my HG/BM setup.  I'm going to put a
sheet metal lid on it, so I can monitor environmental temps more.  I'm going
to fiddle with my profiles to keep ET ramp positive.  I'm going to reduce
the amount of time between 300 F and 400F to 5 minutes (Ed B. has reported
positively about this).
Way more questions than answers.  We shall see, we shall see.  And this is
why this is so much fun!
bill
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