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Topic: Light vs. Dark Roasts (6 msgs / 139 lines)
1) From: Tomenid
Hmmm, I came into roasting as mostly liking darker roasts. I've now gone to  
lighter roasts, though I still prefer coffees that go to FC or FC+ and perhaps 
 to VR. I never go below C+, having found that most C roasts bore me after a  
couple of sips. At C+ I can get nice smooth flavors. And, yes, I roast to the 
 recommended profiles. Every once in a while I do fix a darker roast in a FP 
and  you do have to have a bean that can take a dark roast.
Tom
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2) From: Ed Needham
I really had to scratch my head with the "C roasts bore me" statement.  I 
personally don't like C roasts, but "bore" is not a term I would use to 
describe them.  There are many, many more flavors in a C roast than in a FC+ 
roast.  Many of those flavors though tend to be harshly bright, astringent 
or just flat out annoying to me.  I prefer a bit more  development of the 
carmelization, and a bit more degradation of the acids, as well as a bit of 
the roasty flavors for balance.  For me, this occurs just before or a few 
seconds past second crack.  The beans, at that level, tend to have no oil on 
them, but occasionally I see a few small spots.  If I take the beans 
further, then I lose the varietal flavors that I pay good money to enjoy. 
The bean then takes on a more roasty flavor, and taken further, takes on a 
bitter, ashy, and biting sensation with the increase of carbonic acids. 
Coffee roasted to this level might work well as an adjunct in a blend, in 
limited amounts, or in a big sweet, slurpy latte with 10 times more milk 
than coffee.
Boring, to me is the flat, dull oily roast with nothing to even hint at 
varietal flavor.  City is many times just cloying and unpleasant, but a good 
way to get an idea of what flavors are inside the bean (good and bad). 
Those who cup samples for a living usually roast very light to enhance the 
positive flavors as well as the faults.  The way they roast though is not 
necessarily pleasant for sipping purposes.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

3) From: Seth Grandeau
Tom,
I'm in much the same boat.  When I started homeroasting, about a year ago, I
thought of myself as a dark roast guy and I bought a lot of Indonesians.
The friend who got me into homeroasting suggested I try IMV.  I've been
enjoying lighter roasts, ever since. :)  Now I get to enjoy both!
On Wed, Sep 24, 2008 at 12:22 PM,  wrote:
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4) From: Scott Bukofsky
One thing I have learned personally is that lighter roasts, especially
approaching City, are darned difficult to get right.  What people really
mean when they say they don't like such light roasts is sometimes "I haven't
had a really good light roast".  It will depend on the roaster type a lot.
Luckily, after a lot of experimentation (and luck) with the Gene Cafe, I can
get a very light roast where there are several minutes between the onset of
first crack and where the roast ends.  This can really smooth out some of
the sour notes and emphasize the entire flavor spectrum.
Of course this is a gross generalization; some people will still naturally
like darker roasts.
-Scotto
On Wed, Sep 24, 2008 at 1:51 PM, Ed Needham  wrote:
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5) From: Dennis
Puro Scuto blend holds up to dark roast great, as do most higher 
elevation Kenyans
good rule of thumb.... the higher elevation the heartier the bean 
(meaning it can take a darker roast)
just my .02 and as always YMMV
Dennis
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6) From: raymanowen
"...you do have to have a bean that can take a dark roast."
Only the nefarious competition would sell coffee beans that refuse to get
darker when you apply more heat for a longer time. Maybe pawning green rocks
on you...
Doesn't say much about the folks that patronize them...
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Avoid rocks that refuse to get darker when heated more. Copper minerals
could start green and turn white...
On Wed, Sep 24, 2008 at 10:22 AM,  wrote:
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