HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Friday after-work cup (6 msgs / 205 lines)
1) From: Bob Glasscock
I don't contribute much to the list but thought  I'd like to share this.
Yesterday I was roasting a new Guatemala Oriente-Dry Process in my IR2 and
by accident punched cool before the end of 1st crack. A couple days before
my roast of this bean went almost to Vienna while trying to complete 1st.
After a day's rest the new roast had lots of aroma and the cup (Chemex) was
much different from the first (over-roasted batch) with very pronounced
berry - nearly a melon flavor - very nice surprise. Why I bring this up - I
have been under the impression that you HAVE to complete 1st crack to have a
finished roast. Apparently that is not so. Opinions?
Bob and Ellen Glasscock
148 Woodland Court
Greenville, AL 36037
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2) From:
I routinely stop my roasts (depending on the bean) half way or so through first crack. I have a behmor...so there is some coast. I have found that this approach works the way I would like for a lot of beans. Some, however, are underroasted and woody tasting. I guess its all about experimentation.
Dean De Crisce
Sent from a Treo phone.

3) From: Allon Stern
On Oct 17, 2008, at 6:47 PM, "Bob Glasscock"   
wrote:
<Snip>
I suspect that you are actually roasting past 1st crack without  
realizing it. How do you determine where it is? On am iRoast, it is  
difficult to tell. I have my iRoast instrumented with a thermocouple.
What is your roast program, where do you usually stop it, and where  
did you stop it this time?
-
allon
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4) From: Bob Glasscock
On Oct 17, 2008, at 6:47 PM, "Bob Glasscock"   
wrote:
<Snip>
I suspect that you are actually roasting past 1st crack without  
realizing it. How do you determine where it is? On am iRoast, it is  
difficult to tell. I have my iRoast instrumented with a thermocouple.
What is your roast program, where do you usually stop it, and where  
did you stop it this time?
My program is 350 for 3 mins., 400 for 3 mins and 425 for 4 mins. Normally I
will stop (depending on the bean) just as it gets into the final stage (3 -
3-1/2 mins to go). Usually 1st occurs at about 4:30 into the roast, with
temp at around 375-380. I've got a pretty good ear and punch cool once 1st
slows down. This time I hit cool with about 5 mins to go, hence producing
the lighter roast. I have to agree my method is not real scientific and
don't use a thermocouple. Perhaps you could suggest a more efficient
profile?
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5) From: Paul
When I vent my iRoast out the window, or have it sitting under the stove vent hood, I can't hear the cracks hardly. But when I roast outside, I set the iRoast below my ear level so I can hear the cracks out of the top very well, despite the loudness of the iRoast.
PAUL CARDER
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6) From: Allon Stern
On Oct 18, 2008, at 2:40 PM, Bob Glasscock wrote:
<Snip>
Five minutes is a fast roast!
Due to limitations of the programming of the iRoast2, your program  
doesn't really mean much. Especially since the temperature reading  
only makes it up to 375-380, the iRoast never actually controls the  
temperature.
I use a 24v DC power supply to control a 12V fan (yes, I run it at  
24V max, and it hasn't quit yet :) drawing air from a dryer duct  
attached to the iRoast, and venting to the outside.
I try to do my initial warm-up in 5 minutes; I target around 350  
degrees (read by thermocouple in the bean mass) at 5 minutes; then I  
have a heat boost to get me into 1st crack; I aim for 400-405 or so  
at 6.5 minutes. Then I ramp it as slowly as I can manage until EOR. I  
can get a 15 minute FC roast using this procedure, and the result is  
much better, IMHO, than a fast roast.
Here's some of a post I sent a while back:
-=-=-=-
The "recipes" you can program into the iRoast only give you an  
illusion of control.
If you don't get the iRoast modulating its fan speed or heat, and you  
hit the "Temp" button and see a temperature FAR below your set point,  
and you measure (with a thermocouple) far above the set point, then  
you know that it doesn't really do anything useful....
except for taking advantage of the fan speeds.
My "recipe" is to run at high fan speed for 5 minutes, low fan speed  
for 1.5 minutes (to goose the heat up to 1st crack), then back to  
high fan speed for the rest of the roast. I measure the actual  
temperature with a thermocouple, and adjust the speed of an external  
exhaust fan, tightly coupled to a duct attached to the iRoast, to  
control the rate of temperature change.
I creep the fan speed up slowly - I wait too long to take action, the  
roast gains momentum and the rise is unstoppable.
FWIW, temperature above 390 (or is it 395?) programmed into the  
iRoast is slow speed, below is high speed. I find the iRoast-supplied  
termperature reading never gets to 390, even while the thermocouple  
reads 450.
the mechanicals are okay, but the firmware & temperature reading  
hardware need work.
-=-=-=-
and another post:
-=-=-=-
I'm coming to the conclusion that rate of change is at least as  
important as absolute temperature. If I let the temperature climb too  
fast, the it seems to be hard to slow down the roast later on. I see  
what is meant by the momentum of the roast.
I think using the vent fan helps with this quite a lot -- I can  
slowly edge the speed to slow the rate of change. If I let the  
temperature climb too fast (through inattention or whatever), the  
crank up the fan in an attempt to recover, it just doesn't work. I  
have to stay on top of it, slowly working the airflow up to keep  
riding the brakes, as it were.
Still refining my process, but I'm settling o something like:
5 minutes of warmup, slowly edging from minimum fan to max until I hit
1.5 minute of heat boost. I turn the fan back down to minimum for  
this part, edging speed back up, trying to get 1st crack just started.
Then back to lower heat, and reset the fan back to minimum, sloowly  
edging up again to minimize the rate of change.
-=-=-=-
HTH
-
allon
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