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Topic: Induction Cooktop (7 msgs / 192 lines)
1) From: Bob Glasscock
Am considering replacing my glass electric cooktop with an induction unit. I
realize that induction cooking has no effect on pyrex, so could you use the
Chemex wire grid to transfer heat to the pyrex? As I understand it, cookware
has to be ferrous to work on this type of unit. -Bob
Bob and Ellen Glasscock
148 Woodland Court
Greenville, AL 36037
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2) From: K W Matley
Early in my experience with my Kenmore induction cooktop, I 
experimented with using a steel heat diffuser between the cooktop and 
an olla (clay bean pot), hoping that I would still be able to use it. 
No luck. The heat diffuser reached a temperature that kicked in the 
cooktop's auto shutoff before it would adequately heat the olla. I 
imagine that the wire grid would behave similarly, or would not have 
enough mass for the cooktop to sense that it's there. I use a small 
butane stove with my Cona vac pot.
As you consider the induction cooktop, I went from a Viking gas range 
to the Kenmore. I was really happy with the responsiveness of the 
induction cooktop, especially its ability to boil a large amount of 
water very quickly and to maintain a very low temperature without 
burning. I really miss having an open flame to char eggplant or 
peppers, though. 
 
The controls on the Kenmore are pretty squirrelly, they don't always 
respond when and how you want them to. It is also very sensitive to 
spills. Sometimes even a few splashes from a boil-over, or some sloppy 
pouring will put the cooktop into error mode and shut down all the 
burners. Same thing if you happen to set down a wet teaspoon too near 
the controls.
If I were to do it again, I'd look for an induction top with an 
infinite variable control, rather than the stepped controls of the 
Kenmore. I'd also seriously consider something like a Wolf, which 
offers an option of mixed induction and gas burners.
Oops, past time to leave for work.... 
On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 09:03:25 -0500, Bob Glasscock wrote:
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3) From: Kathleen Tinkel
I recently bought a single-pot induction cooktop (a fancy hot plate) 
because I was thinking about my next kitchen and was curious about 
its benefits and limitations.
Benefits: Timing built in, lovely control over temperature (great for 
simmering, for example), fairly fast heat transfer.
Limitations: Fussy about pots. The pan's bottom must be utterly flat 
(not cupped or recessed, with rings, or anything else - flat as a 
pancake). The thing loves old-fashioned (rustable) steel and cast 
iron, including enamel cast iron like Le Crueset. It works with 
All-Clad stainless (which has heavy steel over aluminum with no 
aluminum exposed) but not with stainless pots with aluminum on the 
bottom (even, in one case, with a thin layer of stainless over the 
aluminum). It may be picky about which alloy of stainless; one thin 
stainless double-boiler from way back when didn't work. No pot whose 
bottom is less than 4.5 inches in diameter. Inefficient with very big 
pots as well (over about 9 inches). I don't know whether a metal grid 
would successfully transfer heat to Pyrex pots, but I suspect it 
would be iffy.
I came to the conclusion that it might be helpful to have one or two 
induction burners  along with regular gas burners but that the 
induction burner is too limited to be my only sort of burner.
Should say that I do all sorts of odd cooking, with all sorts of pots 
and pans, accumulated over many decades. If your life is more 
orderly, you might do fine with an all-induction kitchen. The 
one-burner unit was about $100; it might be useful to experiment 
before committing to the entire countertop.
Kathleen
At 9:03 AM -0500 10/28/08, Bob Glasscock wrote:
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4) From: Sandy Andina
If a magnet sticks to the grid, it's sufficiently ferrous to use (I  
got a few odd stares strolling through restaurant supply stores and  
Bed, Bath & Beyond touching a fridge magnet to the bottoms of the pots  
& pans!
On Oct 28, 2008, at 9:03 AM, Bob Glasscock wrote:
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Sandy Andina
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5) From: Sandy Andina
Or you could do what I do:  use a gas range and buy a standalone  
induction burner.
On Oct 28, 2008, at 9:45 AM, K W Matley wrote:
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6) From: Bob Glasscock
That's excellent info, and while there is actually no reason to replace our
current electric unit, my wife and I both prefer gas to electric anyway
having both worked in restaurants. I'd buy a Vulcan if I could afford it.
- Bob Glasscock

7) From: Brian Kamnetz
Bob,
Great information. Thanks for posting it. I had never heard of
induction heating until I ran into in the Zojirushi rice cookers. That
piqued my curiosity and I'm very happy to have the chance to learn
from your experiences.
Brian
On Tue, Oct 28, 2008 at 10:45 AM, K W Matley  wrote:
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