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Topic: Problems with Trosser (9 msgs / 203 lines)
1) From: Brian Kamnetz
I have a couple Trosser hand grinders that I like quite a bit. A while
back I bought another Trosser hand grinder on eBay, and it looks like
it was virtually unused. I decided to give it to my brother-in-law,
along with a moka pot. The Trosser had a bit of rust on the burrs,
shaft, etc, but that cleaned right up.
Well, I got here to Michigan and we used the Trosser and moka pot to
make some coffee. The Trosser, the larger square shape, with red knob
on the grinder handle, and red knob on the drawer, doesn't work very
well. What it grinds is fine, in the finer grind range, but the
problem is that it is VERY slow, because the beans do not want to go
into the burrs. They seem to get hung up just above the burrs. I don't
have another hand grinder here to compare, so I don't know how it
differs from my other Trosser grinders, if at all.
Has anyone else had this experience with Trosser hand grinders, or any
other hand grinders?
Brian
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2) From: Michael Wascher
I have a Trosser & a Zassenhaus. Both work fine, but are very different.
The Trosser has less aggressive burrs, that makes it much easier to turn but
it requires a lot more turns in order to grind a set amount of coffee. This
may be what you are experiencing.
After cleaning, reassembling and tuning mine I found that it was much more
importent to have the burrs centerred in the Trosser. The beans feed at a
faster rate & the grind is more consistent in the Trosser.
Also, and remember that I have just one of each make to compare, I've found
that the Zassenhaus can grind finer than my Trosser.
On Sun, Dec 21, 2008 at 12:09 PM, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"If there is anything the nonconformist hates worse than a conformist, it's
another nonconformist who doesn't conform to the prevailing standard of
nonconformity." --Bill Vaughan
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3) From: Brian Kamnetz
Michael,
When I took the Trosser all apart and cleaned it, and went to put it
back together, I wasn't sure how to center the burrs, so I just sort
of eye-balled it, so maybe it is centered poorly and that is
contributing to the problem. Any suggestions on how to center it a bit
better?
As I mentioned, I have other Trossers (and a Zass 169DG), and even
compared to my other Trosser grinders, this Trosser grinds very
slowly, and it is because the beans do not want to enter the burrs. In
fact, at the end I spun the handle several times, but there were still
5-6 beans left in the hopper.
Brian
On Sun, Dec 21, 2008 at 12:24 PM, Michael Wascher  wrote:
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4) From: Michael Wascher
Mine had two wood screws holding the bottom assembly. they run through slots
on tabs.
I loosened them then ran the top burr down until it stopped (adjusted for
fine grind). Since the burrs are conical this should force the bottom
assembly to center on the top burr.
Then I tightened the screws.
Since tightening the screws moves the bottom burr up you need to take are
that you don't bind the burs by forcing them together too tight.
On Sun, Dec 21, 2008 at 12:33 PM, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"If there is anything the nonconformist hates worse than a conformist, it's
another nonconformist who doesn't conform to the prevailing standard of
nonconformity." --Bill Vaughan
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5) From: Brian Kamnetz
Makes sense, Michael. I will try that and see if performance improves
a bit. Thanks for the tip.
Brian
On Sun, Dec 21, 2008 at 12:44 PM, Michael Wascher  wrote:
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6) From: Dave Kvindlog
How did you clean up the rust on the burrs?  I have an old Zassenhaus that
I'd like to get cleaned up...
On Sun, Dec 21, 2008 at 11:09 AM, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Dave Kvindlog
iHomeroast
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
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7) From: Derek Bradford
I've used Evapo-Rust on lots of old tools and it works great.  It's
non-toxic and relatively safe to handle, you can use it again and again (up
to a point of course), and most importantly, it does an excellent job.  I
think it would be great for cleaning up a burr set.
--Derek
On Mon, Dec 22, 2008 at 12:27 PM, Dave Kvindlog wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Every path but your own is the path of fate.  --Thoreau
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8) From: Brian Kamnetz
Dave,
It didn't take much, it was mostly superficial rust. First I ran a
batch of minute rice through it. The rice was slightly rust colored,
and I decided to dump it all back in and run it through again, and
again. Each time the rice was a bit more rice colored and the burrs a
bit cleaner. But then I decided to take it apart, and buffed the burrs
and shaft, up to and including the threads, with a wire brush. It
cleaned up surprisingly well.
Brian
On Mon, Dec 22, 2008 at 11:27 AM, Dave Kvindlog  wrote:
<Snip>
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9) From: Brian Kamnetz
It suddenly dawned on me that I have another Trosser along with me.
Later this week I will join a couple buddies at a cabin in northern
Wisconsin for a couple days of ice fishing, and I brought a coffee kit
for that time, including my other grinder. So I was able to compare
the burrs of the problem Trosser with the burrs on my other Trosser.
Turns out that centering is the least of the problem. The burrs are
completely different, hard to believe that they are from the same
manufacturer. In my regurlar Trosser, the burrs have a flange , I
guess you might call it, spiraling along the shaft down toward the
burrs. In the problem Trosser, instead of a flange, it's more of a
nub. Just sort of bumps the beans out of the way instead of driving
them down into the burrs to be ground.
The problem Trosser is apparently old, at least is says "made in
Western Germany" on the bottom. The emblem looks the same on both
grinders. But the handle on the problem Trosser is much more roughly
finished, looks like it wasn't sanded at all before the paint went on.
And the grind adjustment on the problem Trosser is on top of the
grinder, with a metal piece hung on the shaft that fits into notches
on the grind adjustment wheel to hold it in place.
Apparently it was made for for decoration than for use. It's
disappointing to think that Trosser manufactured such an inferior
product. I suppose it is possible it is a knock-off.
Brian
On Sun, Dec 21, 2008 at 12:44 PM, Michael Wascher  wrote:
<Snip>
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