HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Aged Sumatra (10 msgs / 204 lines)
1) From: Richard Estes
I just received some of the light brown, aged Sumatra from Sweet Maria's and
am wondering if anyone has roasting recommendations?
Richard Estes
Bellingham, WA USA
richardhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast">http://www.richardestes.info/index/homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: David Lewis
At 3:04 PM -0800 2/18/02, Richard Estes wrote:
<Snip>
Well, for espresso, I like it taken to an aggressive full city, just 
short of first oil. In my HWP, that's about thirty seconds into 
second crack. For vac pot, maybe fifteen seconds less. I love the 
stuff, but it's not to everyone's taste. Very earthy. Enjoy.
Best,
	David
-- 
"In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In 
practice, there is."
	-- John Cage
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: Mike McGinness
From: "Richard Estes" 
<Snip>
and
<Snip>
Read Tom's reviews and roast recommendation. I agree. Just a few snaps into
2nd crack for Full City.
MM;-)
Home Roasting in Vancouver, WA USA
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

4) From: Tara Kollas
Anyone tried this yet?  I got a pound in my last shipment and was going to
roast some up this weekend.  Just wondering if there was anything I should
look for.
Tara

5) From: Michael Wascher
I got some too, just yesterday, so haven't had a chance to roast yet. I got
a pound of it and one of the Monsooned beans.
Please share any accumulated wisdom.
On 1/27/06, Tara Kollas  wrote:
<Snip>
o
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
--
"Life is just one damned thing after another."
  - Elbert Hubbard

6) From: mIke mcKoffee
Not sure what you mean. If you've never had an aged Indonesian coffee
before, I'll say don't look for a bright lively cup! It's a deep brooding
cup, but in a very different way than Monsooned. Kind of smoky sweet. It's a
bit one dimensional, especially as a straight shot, not bad but I prefer is
as the bass notes of an espresso blend rather than SO shot. 
Debi like's it SO Americano.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Tara Kollas
	Sent: Friday, January 27, 2006 8:55 AM
	To: homeroasters
	Subject: +aged sumatra
	
	Anyone tried this yet?  I got a pound in my last shipment and was
going to roast some up this weekend.  Just wondering if there was anything I
should look for.
	Tara

7) From: Dan Kellgren
Just got in some aged Sumatra and was pleasantly shocked when I saw the
beans (and obvious newbie here).
I'm using a hand-crank stove-top popper and am afraid it will jam up pretty
good.  I have a aluminium one (saving up for the stainless steel one).
Anyone have any experience with an aged bean and a stove-top popper?  I'm
also looking for a good roast profile for this method with these beans.
Thanks,
Dan

8) From: Rodney Stanton
I have an aluminium Whirley and I have roasted the Aged Sumatra (03).  While I do not know your stove top, on mine stove top the successful path was low and slow.  I found this bean did not want to take on heat quickly.  The first half of the roast, the time prior to first crack, was done at 1/3rd of full power on the burner.  The last half was done at 2/3rds.  
This is exactly opposite of how I roast my Kenyans and Island coffees.  I tried  what I call "front loading" the heat on other Sumatran beans and it just never works in my setup.  Low and slow comes out amazing.
I would say that a cast iron pan under  your popper will do more for  you than moving to stainless.  I have both Stainless and aluminum and prefer my Al inside a dutch oven.
Rodney
----- Original Message ----
From: Dan Kellgren 
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday, May 22, 2006 10:03:45 AM
Subject: +Aged Sumatra
Just got in some aged Sumatra and was pleasantly shocked when I saw the beans (and obvious newbie here).
  
 I'm using a hand-crank stove-top popper and am afraid it will jam up pretty good.  I have a aluminium one (saving up for the stainless steel one).
  
 Anyone have any experience with an aged bean and a stove-top popper?  I'm also looking for a good roast profile for this method with these beans.
  
 Thanks,
 Dan
 

9) From: Dan Kellgren
Great info Rodney - thanks.  Do you have any temperature indications for
that low and slow profile?  I generally roast 230 - 330 (air temp) over a
12-15 minute.
I don't know the brand on mine, but lately it's been jamming up something
fierce in the early stages (until beans expand).  It used to be only with
the smaller beans (peaberries, etc.), but now it's nearly every bean.  I've
cleaned it, tweaked it, smoothed it - everything.  But it still jams up.
I'm extra fearful for this aged one.
So you're using the cast iron to help diffuse the heat?
On 5/22/06, Rodney Stanton  wrote:
<Snip>
.
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t
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my
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10) From: Rodney Stanton
Thermometers in Whirley's can only be used for relating one roast to another using the same equipment and beans.  For instance, I roast one pound.  I hit first crack at 325 F almost always and second crack can be anywhere from 355F->380F.
Times: Yeah, with a pound I do 12-15 minutes.
Jumping.  Yeap, mine can too.  I find that alternating direction  of rotation helps with some beans. 
I use the cast iron for diffusion and as a thermal bank.  
Guess:Aluminium on its on is just a bean container in heat ( IMO ) and relies on the burner to blast heat in after the beans are added.  The cast iron underneath store heat which the aluminium wicks up to the beans when it cools.
Opening: If you are opening the lid to look at the beans, don't.  It only hurts the process.  
Rodney
----- Original Message ----
From: Dan Kellgren 
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday, May 22, 2006 10:46:48 AM
Subject: Re: +Aged Sumatra
Great info Rodney - thanks.  Do you have any temperature indications for that low and slow profile?  I generally roast 230 - 330 (air temp) over a 12-15 minute.
  
 I don't know the brand on mine, but lately it's been jamming up something fierce in the early stages (until beans expand).  It used to be only with the smaller beans (peaberries, etc.), but now it's nearly every bean.  I've cleaned it, tweaked it, smoothed it - everything.  But it still jams up.  I'm extra fearful for this aged one. 
  
 So you're using the cast iron to help diffuse the heat?
 On 5/22/06, Rodney Stanton  wrote:      I have an aluminium Whirley and I have roasted the Aged Sumatra (03).  While I do not know your stove top, on mine stove top the successful path was low and slow.  I found this bean did not want to take on heat quickly.  The first half of the roast, the time prior to first crack, was done at 1/3rd of full power on the burner.  The last half was done at 2/3rds.   
This is exactly opposite of how I roast my Kenyans and Island coffees.  I tried  what I call "front loading" the heat on other Sumatran beans and it just never works in my setup.  Low and slow comes out amazing. 
I would say that a cast iron pan under  your popper will do more for  you than moving to stainless.  I have both Stainless and aluminum and prefer my Al inside a dutch oven.
 
Rodney
 
----- Original Message ----
From: Dan Kellgren < dkellgren>
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday, May 22, 2006 10:03:45 AM 
Subject: +Aged Sumatra
 Just got in some aged Sumatra and was pleasantly shocked when I saw the beans (and obvious newbie here).
  
 I'm using a hand-crank stove-top popper and am afraid it will jam up pretty good.  I have a aluminium one (saving up for the stainless steel one).
  
 Anyone have any experience with an aged bean and a stove-top popper?  I'm also looking for a good roast profile for this method with these beans.
  
 Thanks,
 Dan


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