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Topic: UPS / Roasting Decafs? (4 msgs / 122 lines)
1) From: JB Christy
My sister used to work for UPS.  They explicitly only care about B2B (business
to business) shipping, 'cause that's where they make their money.  They
genuinely don't care when one or the other end of the shipment is a residential
customer -- individuals who ship only occasionally are an annoyance to them, not
a reliable enough stream of income to care about.  I appreciate that Tom allows
us to choose our shipper -- I've requested that Amazon and QVC do the same.
When I care about receiving the package on time, I choose anybody but UPS; when
I'm in no hurry I choose UPS ground, 'cause it's cheaper (you get what you pay
for) and I can track it better.
Since this is a coffee-related list, I'll try to at least mention coffee in
every post:
I'm having a little trouble roasting decafs.  I had read that decafs roast
faster than non-decafs, so when I did my first batch of Kenya decaf I
specifically listened closely.  But it seemed to both begin and end first crack
at around the same time as the non-decaf (3:40-5:10 in my HWP), so I ended up
roasting it the same amount of time as the non-decaf.  However, sure enough the
decaf beans ended up being quite dark and oily, whereas the non-decaf are just
at City roast.
Do decaf beans *sound* different than non-decaf beans?  How did I mis-time the
roast?  What should do differently next time (other than just stop 1:00-1:30
sooner :-)?
a T d H v A a N n K c S e.
--JB
<Snip>
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2) From: David Lewis
At 3:54 PM -0500 2/21/02, JB Christy wrote:
<Snip>
In my HWP, I can rarely hear second crack with decafs. I think the 
decaffeination process weakens the structure of the bean so that what 
happens during second crack has already happened to some extent. I 
find decaf roasting much more reliable when I do it by smell. Decafs 
have a fairly unpleasant smell until just before second crack, so I 
stop when it smells sweet. This is also a good indicator with regular 
beans, but it's stronger with decaf. Hope this helps.
	David
-- 
"In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In 
practice, there is."
	-- John Cage
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3) From: Doug Cadmus
Decaf beans *do* sound different. And they certainly *look* different, too.
If a result of 97-98% caffeine free is agreeable, you might give this a
try -- I've found that adding a number of non-decaf beans to a roast can
act as "markers" -- and help to identify in relative terms what typical
roast conditions would be. They do first and second cracks precisely as
you'd expect... which will give you very useful feedback as to where those
silly decaf beans should be, too.
Me, I roast decaf Sumatra [for Mom... I don't drink the stuff], and I use
mild Centrals as markers, given decaf beans' tendency to roast just a bit
quick.
Happy roasting!
-deCadmus
decadmus
--
 ~brewed fresh daily~
www.bloggle.com/coffee

4) From: jim schulman
On 22 Feb 2002 at 0:33, Doug Cadmus wrote:
<Snip>
I don't think this'll work with all beans or roasters. 
I like to spike donkey blend with about 20% bright tasting caffeinated 
beans. If I roast them together in the FR or FR+, the Donkey is into 
it's second crack and oily while Yemen, Ethiopian, or Indian 
Robustas are barely out of the first, and still grassy and pale. I've 
found I have to "preroast" the caffeinatd beans for 30 seconds (FR) 
or 45 seconds (FR+) to get the timing right.
FYI: The decaf ghimbi is unbelievable, bright and heavy bodied 
enough to work on its own. But it oils up early in the roast, and needs 
to be stopped at the first hint of the second crack.
Jim Schulman 
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