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Topic: Single Malt Scotch (5 msgs / 278 lines)
1) From: Thomas Gremaud
If your town has a wine or spirits shop, see if that shop has a scotch
specialist on staff.  If there is one in your town, it might provide samples
of bottles they have open.  If you want to be sure you get a good single
malt, look for a place like this.  You can get a quality scotch that isn't a
grocery store brand.

2) From: Joe Preiser
[Pardon my spelling; I'm typing this on my phone's micro keyboard.]
IMO, whisky from the Highland and Speyside regions are much more conducive 
to new Scotch drinkers. It took me a while to get used to, and appreciate 
the Islay offerings.
My 'training wheels' single malts would be Glenlivet, Aberlour, and 
Macallan. For the adventurous, go for Lagavullin, Laphroaig, and Ardbeg (my 
new favorite).
I'm learning to appreciate some bourbons but the 'sweetness' from the new 
oak is a little too much for me for the most part.
Also, if you're near one of the cities (and can wait that long) where one 
of Malt Advocate's Whisk(e)yFests is held, I recommend trying to attend. 
I've been dabbling with Highland and Islay single malts for several years 
but my eyes were opened to much more when I was finally able to attend this 
year's Fest in Chicago.  The ticket price is worth it for the amount you 
get to sample (and find a new favorite).
--

3) From: Michael Dhabolt
Thomas and Joe reminded me of a good way to get your feet wet with a selection.
In Portland (and I expect other cities) there are several 'Single Malt
Saloons' (or Bars).  I can't imagine what the inventory must be worth
- $$$.  The ones I have visited were really nice places with a small
private club atmosphere.
A couple of these places offer a sort of 'newbie' service that
consists of partial shots of several different whiskies.  For the
price of a single shot of medium cost whiskey you could get three of
four partial shots and a large glass of water to clense your pallat in
between.  Sort of a neat service,  you can try a bunch of different
drinks and still be able to walk out.
Another thing that impressed me about the place I went to was that
they had an old single group behind the bar La Marzocco and the
bartender pulled pretty decent shots of 'Hairbender'.  They were
located in an area of Portland where you don't get away with second
rate espresso.
Class act!
Mike (just plain)
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4) From: Seth Grandeau
I don't know if they still do it, but Johnny Walker used to do an
Introduction to Scotch night, with dinner and scotch tastings.  It was all
free and they more than made their money back on me. :)  If I remember
correctly, we sampled 4 single malts, plust the black, red and gold label
blends.  They also went through the history and making of scotch.  My
favorite moment was when our heavily accented host referred to one scotch (I
want to say Dalwhinnie) as a good "breakfast scotch".
On Tue, Jul 7, 2009 at 7:30 PM, Michael Dhabolt
wrote:
<Snip>
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5) From: Bob Hazen
Although I haven't tasted it, I understand that Dalwhinnie is light and 
sweet; almost honey-like.  "Breakfast scotch" sounds appropriate.
Bob


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