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Topic: OT: HP (8 msgs / 167 lines)
1) From: Yakster
I used the HP-41 CV with the circuits and math pack through college, but
gave up searching for those funny N type batteries and downloaded a virtual
HP41 for the desktop at www.hp41.org that gives me my RPN (Reverse Polish
Notation) fix.
It's handier then an adding machine for me.
-Chris
On Tue, Aug 18, 2009 at 9:18 PM,  wrote:
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2) From: Bonnie Polkinghorn
I can just so vaguely remember using those RPN HP calculators, like Enter
Enter plus plus plus.   They had a wonderful clicky sound and feel when you
clicked the numbers.
-Bonnie
On Tue, Aug 18, 2009 at 9:54 PM, Yakster  wrote:
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3) From: Captain CowPie
Aaaah, the HP-41 CV. It helped me get through engineering and math  
classes. I had a bunch of the packs. I got really good at RPN, and I  
still have the machine. I even had the program strips and reader and a  
thermal printer to go with it. The more I write, the more I am  
sounding like a geek ;)
But you are right, the N type batteries are hard to find and  
expensive. I still use it every once in a while, but less and less as  
the years go on. I will have to try your recommended site. Thanks for  
the heads up.
Vince
Allergic to Gravity
AllergicToGravity.com
Unique LEGO Portraits & Sculptures
On Aug 19, 2009, at 12:54 AM, Yakster wrote:
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4) From: Frank Parth
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Back in 1972 I started graduate work in physics. As a graduate assistant I refused to let students use the new HP-25 
calculator that just came out. I was absolutely convinced that students had to master a slide rule and not rely on some 
new-fangled gadget that could add, subtract, multiply, and divide. (Besides, the year before I dropped a lot of 
money(for a graduate student) on a new 10 inch Dietzen deci-log slide rule.)
Frank
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5) From: Rich
Calculators are nice but nothing takes the place of the knowledge of how 
to work it out with a pencil from scratch.  I still have my original 
HP-10C and 15C not to mention several slide rules, and a perfectly 
functional #2 1/2 pencil.
I have known many people with very high dollar calculators that would be 
better off if they were using it for a door stop.
Frank Parth wrote:
  > Back in 1972 I started graduate work in physics. As a graduate 
assistant
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6) From: Phil Palmintere
I remember a physics class (undergrad) with maybe 300 in the auditorium for
the final exam.  I remember the click-click-click of 300 fingers punching
buttons on the owner's respective calculators - almost like the sound of a
farm of manual typewriters in the "secretarial pool" from a movie from the
1940s... click, click, click went the calculators... until... 
Some student's calculator fell off his work surface.  He tried to catch the
calculator mid-fall but didn't have the hand-eye coordination.  His attempt
made everything worse - the calculator fumbled in the air on its way
downward, hitting the aisle with force, and going CLAP CLAP CLAP down the
stairs of the aisle towards the front of the auditorium.  
As it did so, every finger in the final exam came to a stop.  Everyone was
horrified at the thought of being without a calculator in the midst of the
final exam. The student stood up, calmly walked down the stairs to the
front, picked up the calculator, turned to the class & said,
"Don't worry. It's an HP."
Everyone breathed a collective sigh of relief and went back to work on the
final, click-click-click resumed the sound of the calculator keys.
True story.  I thought it would make a great TV commercial.
:-)
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7) From: Dave Bush
I recall my quantum mechanics prof who would always race the class to solve an equation. Us with the latest HPs or TIs and him talking us through an estimated answer. He was never beaten and was virtually always accurate to 2 significant digits--more than adequate for class work.
BTW, still have my first scientific calculator, an HP35 purchased in '73 for $399. And it still works. No telling how many times it was dropped and kept on working. Couldn't say the same thing for the TIs that shattered the first time they hit the deck.
 
On Wednesday, August 19, 2009, at 02:31PM, "Phil Palmintere"  wrote:
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8) From: Mike Chester
I completely agree with you about knowing how to do math manually before 
resorting to electronics.  I am afraid that low cost high tech devices are 
creating a whole generation of people unable to do the simplest of 
calculations.  Even if you know how to perform manual calculations the 
machines can also make you lazy.  We have all seen (usually young, but not 
always) people who don't have a clue how make change if the machine does not 
tell them how much to give back.  McD's goes one step farther - They 
eliminate the need to be able to read. They just have pictures of the food 
items that sell on their cash registers.  The clerk just pushes a button 
next to the picture.  Of course, not all young people are dumb.  There some 
brilliant young minds out there particularly in computers.  There are 12 
year olds that know much more about computers than I will ever know and I am 
not a slouch in that area.  The really gifted will always find a way to 
learn and challenge themselves.  Where I am concerned is with the average 
person.  I think that the average is going down.
Mike Chester


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