HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Resting coffees after roast (16 msgs / 393 lines)
1) From: Yakster
This recalls a question that I've been wondering about myself, what happens
when you rest beans after the roast.  I've heard many opine that the only
thing that happens after the roast is staling of beans, and that for some
reason beans that have been staled from 1 to 4 days taste better then right
out of the roaster, but if you let your beans stale past 14 days, it's
rubbish.
This doesn't ring true for me, the roasts I've had that require rest
definitely get more balanced and integrated and can loose their grassy
flavors with rest, but it's the balance that interests me.  Since I've been
roasting almonds in the Behmor I've noticed the same thing, the roasted
flavors come together much better a day after the roast, even though there's
no real off tastes right after roasting, it just doesn't taste like they're
quite done yet... like the Maillard Reactions continue in some respect with
rest.
It's got me curious what's going on inside those seeds.
-Chris
On Mon, Mar 22, 2010 at 12:04 AM,  wrote:
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2) From: John and Emma
As far as what is happening in the seeds I can't answer that. For me and my
wife when roasting to FC to FC+ we find 1 to 4 days rest is optimal. There
are changes over these few days but past 4 days the coffee becomes bland and
loses its highlights. When roasting to C to C+ we find the longer rest time
of 4 to 7 days optimal. For us you lose the grassy flavour and the
highlights of the beans are more distinct. Beyond 7 days rest we find that
all coffee starts to lose its unique characteristics. This is a generality
and there may be specific beans that are different.
Just our opinion.
John H.

3) From: Joseph Robertson
Think Potato salad...
Always better the next day or soooo....
Staling coffee? I call it resting and developing.
Joe
On Mon, Mar 22, 2010 at 10:15 AM, Yakster  wrote:
<Snip>
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4) From: Allon Stern
On Mar 22, 2010, at 2:00 PM, John and Emma wrote:
<Snip>
I dunno, I think that some coffees are just hitting their stride at 7 days. Then again, I like to go very light with DP coffees, and with those, I think a bit more rest is good. I'd say that they start to degrade after 14 days or so. 
Darker roasts tend to degrade (for drip) faster, I think, with the weird exception of espresso - espresso often likes a good bit of rest on  it, often at least 5 days or more. Go figure.
I guess the only hard and fast rule is that the aging requirements vary greatly by bean and how it is roasted.
-
allon
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5) From: Joseph Robertson
The only hard fast rule I hold to is this:
Roast your beans, brew and drink your coffee, do it again and again till
that roast is gone. Enjoy the wonderful changes that take place each and
every day you drink it.
When I bought my Faema E61 Jubilee from an Italian sales person at a coffee
fest he told me in a salesman type of way that Americans are too crazy about
freshness. "In Italy the beans may age/develop/stale how ever you look at it
for months." I think if I travel to Italy I will pack my little IRoast after
hearing that.
JR
On Mon, Mar 22, 2010 at 11:31 AM, Allon Stern  wrote:
<Snip>
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6) From: Frank Parth
<Snip>
And I can't think of anyone that says drink the coffee immediately after roasting. The recommendations I've heard are 
to let it rest, sometimes at least 48 hours before it's really drinkable.
My roasts increase their flavor from 24 hours out to almost a week, sometimes longer. I've never had a roast last 
longer than 10 days or so and I can't say what happens after that.
Your mileage may vary.
Frank
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7) From: Brian Kamnetz
Actually, Frank, I routinely brew coffee immediately after roasting.
It often has some very interesting characteristics that are not there
after even a few hours rest. But then, unless I'm out of roasted
coffee, I let it rest a minimum of a couple days before brewing more.
Brian
On Mon, Mar 22, 2010 at 4:35 PM, Frank Parth  wrote:
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8) From: raymanowen
"...a question that I've been wondering about myself, what happens when you
rest beans after the roast.
I've heard many opine that the only thing that happens after the roast is
staling of beans, and that for some reason beans that have been staled from
1 to 4 days taste better then right out of the roaster, but if you let your
beans stale past 14 days, -*it's rubbish.*"
You said a mouthful - emphasis mine.
We've come a long way since the Goats imbibed coffee that was neither
roasted nor aged. They weren't dancing- They Were Gagging. The stuff was
Terrible, and they clearly said so- "Bah!"
<Snip>
environment of roasting the hydrocarbon beans would represent the ultimate
Staling event. The subsequent evolution of CO2 from the roasted beans
continues for as long as they are still fresh, in my opinion.
Maintain the roasted beans in this naturally-occurring CO2 bath and they
maintain freshness as they age. The CO2 is more dense and displaces oxygen,
so staling can't occur as long as the beans are submerged.
If you are curious and really want to sample stale beans, try some Archer
Farms coffee from the bins at Target. Not their prime commodity and no
better stored than letters in PO boxes. CO2 seeps right out and the O2 fraction
in the atmosphere is pulled in behind it.
Think- "100# of peanut butter." In an open bowl- stale. Coffee absolutely
stales when it oxidizes, not at all when it's kept submerged in the out
gassing CO2. If you can hermetically seal your favorite burlap bag or bamboo
basket, it's all good.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
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9) From: Bob Hazen
My mileage >is< different!  (grin)
I have had great coffee with beans still warm from the roaster.  That's 
often when drifty, volatile flavors are alive never to be seen again.  With 
a coffee where this is most evident, I notice a drop in flavor at about 1-2 
days, then it peaks with low notes (minus the volatiles) at 3-4 days where 
it starts a decline.
It has been quite interesting to taste the different flavors at various 
ages.  I hesitate to embrace any rules of thumb, only that the flavors are 
time dependent.  It's worth defying conventional wisdom and cupping some 
young coffees.
Bob
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10) From: Doug Hoople
I might add here the observation that darker roasts are "ready" earlier than
lighter roasts.
One of the possible reasons is that the "bright" flavors appear to be
"brightest" just out of the roaster. In some cases with bright, acidic
coffee, lightly roast, that might just set your teeth on edge it's so
bright.
When the volatiles combine with the natural acidity of the bean and the
higher acidity of lighter roasts, blowing off the volatiles by resting a few
days to tone things down a little makes a lot of sense.
Darker roasts appear to mute the high, bright notes, and so are ready
earlier.
Does any of this make sense?
Doug
On Mon, Mar 22, 2010 at 10:01 PM, Bob Hazen  wrote:
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11) From: Jim Gundlach
I am not sure just how it makes sense but my experience does lead me  
to agree entirely with it.  When I roast in the wok and need coffee  
rather soon, because of my usual poor planning, I will take all but a  
couple of days supply out at the right point and over roast the  
remaining a bit just to get by for a couple of days.
      pecan jim
On Mar 23, 2010, at 5:30 PM, Doug Hoople wrote:
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12) From: Bob Hazen
It makes complete sense to me.  I recall an unruly, tart, light-roasted 
Kenyan that was undrinkable even after a couple days.  It took  a good 10 
days rest, but it finally settled down.  Makes my mouth pucker just thinking 
about it.  I general, I prefer heavier, less-bright coffees roasted to FC or 
FC+.  Right out of the roaster they're not so jarring as that darn Kenyan of 
days past.
Bob
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13) From: Bob Hazen
Poor planning?  You too?  (grin)
That's exactly how I learned I have a fondness for beans warm from the 
roaster!  I guess being late for work occasionally due to emergency coffee 
roasting might be a bit obsessive, eh?
Bob
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14) From: John and Emma
The first time I ever had home roasted coffee was on a trip in Costa Rica.
The gentleman learned how much I was into drinking coffee and offered to
make me the best cup I ever had (I have always drank coffee day and night).
He took green beans and used an air popper to roast them right there, used a
colander to cool the beans and culled the unroasted ones (about 4). He
ground the roasted beans, brewed them using the sock style brewer you see
everywhere in Costa Rica and made the best cup of coffee for us in our
lives. Rest time was as long as it took to cool the beans (a couple of
minutes tops). My first experience with home roasting and I was hooked. That
is the start of where I am today.
John H.
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15) From: Ed Needham
Lighter beans still contain more of the volatiles, the flavenoids, the
fruity acids, the sugars.  They will mute over time until the staling
process overrides the muting.  Darker roasts have burned away more of these
components and carbon is pretty stable (grin).
Roasted coffee beans do change over time, and based on personal preference,
level of roast, individual varietals, it only makes sense that there will be
a 'sweet spot' for beans at different times out of the roaster.  I
personally like the beans at roast time for their dancing flavors and
liveliness most often, but I have tasted beans at a week that were very
nutty, smooth and mellow.  The right out of the roaster tastes and smells
are pretty much why I homeroast and don't buy beans at the local
coffeehouses.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

16) From: g paris
ED:
<Snip>
are pretty much why I homeroast and don't buy beans at the local
coffeehouses.<<<
I could not agree more.
ginny
have a great wek!
On Tue, Aug 24, 2010 at 3:04 PM, Ed Needham  wrote:
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