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Topic: iced coffee idea (6 msgs / 307 lines)
1) From: Kim Phipps
There is a great article in Imbibe magazine from a couple of years ago that=
 gives some good ideas for iced coffee techniques. =http://www.imbibemagazine.com/Iced-Coffee-How-ToI do use the cold brew method occasionally, but I am hooked on the amazing =
aromas and flavors that you get from the drip method going immediately to i=
ce. It's referred to as Japanese method by some--there is a specific pot yo=
u can buy for this, but I don't use one. In any case--something really tast=
y happens. For this, I just use the drip cones (or my smart drip cone) but =
you can use the metal vietnamese filter or even an aeropress. The key is to=
 have your receptacle already filled with ice, so that the hot double stren=
gth brew hits the ice and cools immediately, preserving the nice bright aci=
ds and flavors.http://www.imbibemagazine.com/Iced-Coffee-How-Tofrom story by Kate Simon
"It’s all about capturing the fruit [notes] and aromas and keeping it sun=
ny-tasting and light,” says Peter Giuliano, co-owner and director of coff=
ee at North Carolina-based roaster Counter Culture Coffee, who has populari=
zed hot-brewed, or “Japanese method,” iced coffee among some foodies an=
d coffee pros. In this method, coffee grounds are placed in a pour-over fil=
ter basket on top of an ice-filled glass or carafe. Hot water is poured ove=
r the grounds and the brewed coffee travels through the filter and directly=
 onto the ice, so that it cools instantly. The amount of ice is figured int=
o the overall water content of the brew, to ensure a result that’s not wa=
tered down. That nearly instantaneous cooling is key to preserving the coff=
ee’s integrity, picking up its natural acidity, which is the source of it=
s most delicate, floral flavors. That’s in contrast to most iced coffee p=
reparations, where regular-strength hot coffee is left to sit for several m=
inutes or even hours and then poured unceremoniously over ice, creating a b=
rew that at its worst is sour and, at best, flimsy and unremarkable.
 =
“Coffee prepared [in the Japanese tradition] changes the way people think=
 about iced coffee,” Giuliano says. He recalls how he first observed Japa=
nese aisu kohii during a visit to Japan and eventually learned the method f=
rom Hidetaka Hayashi of the Hayashi Coffee Institute in Tokyo. He found tha=
t Japanese iced coffee, with its pronounced citrus flavors and aromas, is a=
 more refreshing beverage, like Assam or Earl Grey tea with a squeeze of le=
mon.
Because the Japanese method highlights a coffee’s top notes—the bouquet=
 of fruity, citrusy, floral flavors and aromatics that decorate the best co=
ffees—Giuliano likes to use the most fruited, flowery African coffees lik=
e jasmine-noted Yirgacheffe and berry-toned Kenyan beans, which tend to be =
lightly roasted, allowing their natural qualities to shine through. “The =
best coffees for this method are those with a pronounced acidity and aroma,=
” he says, because they produce the most showy flavors. Bright, light-roa=
sted Latin American coffees can also shine. =
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2) From: michael brown
I wanted to thank you all for sharing your experiences and recipes.  I ende=
d up with the hot brew method, pouring it over ice. It actually turned into=
 a funny Macgyver kind of operation.  My plan was to use my chemex, put ice=
 in the bottom chamber and do it that way.  I forgot that left my chemex at=
 the office.So i found a strainer in the kitchen that happened to sit on th=
e top of a big pitcher just perfectly.  I tried to follow the specific dire=
ctions in the article that was shared below.  I ended up playing with the i=
ce to water ratio a few time.I marked off where 64 ounces would be on the i=
nside of the pitcher.  Filled the pitcher about half full with ice and ende=
d up using about 40-45 oz of water heated through my bodum.  I put a cup an=
d half of medium grind in a paper filter in the strainer and poured.  The r=
esulting brew was not too acidic, watered down, and retained almost all the=
 flavors of how this blend tasted hot.It was a big hit!
Thanks again!  I had enough to put in the fridge and am sipping on some lef=
t overs this morning.
Michael B
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at gives some good ideas for iced coffee techniques. =
<Snip>
g aromas and flavors that you get from the drip method going immediately to=
 ice. It's referred to as Japanese method by some--there is a specific pot =
you can buy for this, but I don't use one. In any case--something really ta=
sty happens. For this, I just use the drip cones (or my smart drip cone) bu=
t you can use the metal vietnamese filter or even an aeropress. The key is =
to have your receptacle already filled with ice, so that the hot double str=
ength brew hits the ice and cools immediately, preserving the nice bright a=
cids and flavors.
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
unny-tasting and light,” says Peter Giuliano, co-owner and director of co=
ffee at North Carolina-based roaster Counter Culture Coffee, who has popula=
rized hot-brewed, or “Japanese method,” iced coffee among some foodies =
and coffee pros. In this method, coffee grounds are placed in a pour-over f=
ilter basket on top of an ice-filled glass or carafe. Hot water is poured o=
ver the grounds and the brewed coffee travels through the filter and direct=
ly onto the ice, so that it cools instantly. The amount of ice is figured i=
nto the overall water content of the brew, to ensure a result that’s not =
watered down. That nearly instantaneous cooling is key to preserving the co=
ffee’s integrity, picking up its natural acidity, which is the source of =
its most delicate, floral flavors. That’s in contrast to most iced coffee=
 preparations, where regular-strength hot coffee is left to sit for several=
 minutes or even hours and then poured unceremoniously over ice, creating a=
 brew that at its worst is sour and, at best, flimsy and unremarkable.
<Snip>
<Snip>
nk about iced coffee,” Giuliano says. He recalls how he first observed Ja=
panese aisu kohii during a visit to Japan and eventually learned the method=
 from Hidetaka Hayashi of the Hayashi Coffee Institute in Tokyo. He found t=
hat Japanese iced coffee, with its pronounced citrus flavors and aromas, is=
 a more refreshing beverage, like Assam or Earl Grey tea with a squeeze of =
lemon.
<Snip>
<Snip>
et of fruity, citrusy, floral flavors and aromatics that decorate the best =
coffees—Giuliano likes to use the most fruited, flowery African coffees l=
ike jasmine-noted Yirgacheffe and berry-toned Kenyan beans, which tend to b=
e lightly roasted, allowing their natural qualities to shine through. “Th=
e best coffees for this method are those with a pronounced acidity and arom=
a,” he says, because they produce the most showy flavors. Bright, light-r=
oasted Latin American coffees can also shine. =
<Snip>
ariascoffee.com
<Snip>
ee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
 		 	   		  =
Hotmail is redefining busy with tools for the New Busy. Get more from your =
inbox.http://www.windowslive.com/campaign/thenewbusy?ocid=PID28326::T:WLMTAGL:O=N:WL:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_2
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3) From: Ryan M. Ward
Sounds like it worked out, thanks for sharing.
-- =
Ryan M. Ward
*Note: This email was sent from a computer running Ubuntu Linux 9.10 (Karmi=
c Koala)http://www.ubuntu.com**Note: This signature was placed here by me and is not automatically-gener=
ated-annoying-end-of-email-spam placed here by anyone other than myself. I =
am a Linux nut and am doing my part to support open source software and the=
 Linux and Ubuntu communities by getting the word out with each email I sen=
d, I encourage you to do the same.
<Snip>
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<Snip>
ded up with the hot brew method, pouring it over ice. It actually turned in=
to a funny Macgyver kind of operation.  My plan was to use my chemex, put i=
ce in the bottom chamber and do it that way.  I forgot that left my chemex =
at the office.So i found a strainer in the kitchen that happened to sit on =
the top of a big pitcher just perfectly.  I tried to follow the specific di=
rections in the article that was shared below.  I ended up playing with the=
 ice to water ratio a few time.I marked off where 64 ounces would be on the=
 inside of the pitcher.  Filled the pitcher about half full with ice and en=
ded up using about 40-45 oz of water heated through my bodum.  I put a cup =
and half of medium grind in a paper filter in the strainer and poured.  The=
 resulting brew was not too acidic, watered down, and retained almost all t=
he flavors of how this blend tasted hot.It was a big hit!
<Snip>
eft overs this morning.
<Snip>
<Snip>
that gives some good ideas for iced coffee techniques. =
<Snip>
ing aromas and flavors that you get from the drip method going immediately =
to ice. It's referred to as Japanese method by some--there is a specific po=
t you can buy for this, but I don't use one. In any case--something really =
tasty happens. For this, I just use the drip cones (or my smart drip cone) =
but you can use the metal vietnamese filter or even an aeropress. The key i=
s to have your receptacle already filled with ice, so that the hot double s=
trength brew hits the ice and cools immediately, preserving the nice bright=
 acids and flavors.
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
 sunny-tasting and light,” says Peter Giuliano, co-owner and director of =
coffee at North Carolina-based roaster Counter Culture Coffee, who has popu=
larized hot-brewed, or “Japanese method,” iced coffee among some foodie=
s and coffee pros. In this method, coffee grounds are placed in a pour-over=
 filter basket on top of an ice-filled glass or carafe. Hot water is poured=
 over the grounds and the brewed coffee travels through the filter and dire=
ctly onto the ice, so that it cools instantly. The amount of ice is figured=
 into the overall water content of the brew, to ensure a result that’s no=
t watered down. That nearly instantaneous cooling is key to preserving the =
coffee’s integrity, picking up its natural acidity, which is the source o=
f its most delicate, floral flavors. That’s in contrast to most iced coff=
ee preparations, where regular-strength hot coffee is left to sit for sever=
al minutes or even hours and then poured unceremoniously over ice, creating=
 a brew that at its worst is sour and, at best, flimsy and unremarkable.
<Snip>
<Snip>
hink about iced coffee,” Giuliano says. He recalls how he first observed =
Japanese aisu kohii during a visit to Japan and eventually learned the meth=
od from Hidetaka Hayashi of the Hayashi Coffee Institute in Tokyo. He found=
 that Japanese iced coffee, with its pronounced citrus flavors and aromas, =
is a more refreshing beverage, like Assam or Earl Grey tea with a squeeze o=
f lemon.
<Snip>
<Snip>
quet of fruity, citrusy, floral flavors and aromatics that decorate the bes=
t coffees—Giuliano likes to use the most fruited, flowery African coffees=
 like jasmine-noted Yirgacheffe and berry-toned Kenyan beans, which tend to=
 be lightly roasted, allowing their natural qualities to shine through. “=
The best coffees for this method are those with a pronounced acidity and ar=
oma,” he says, because they produce the most showy flavors. Bright, light=
-roasted Latin American coffees can also shine. =
<Snip>
tmariascoffee.com
<Snip>
ffee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
<Snip>
<Snip>
r inbox.
<Snip>
:ON:WL:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_2
<Snip>
ariascoffee.com
<Snip>
ee.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820
 		 	   		  =
The New Busy think 9 to 5 is a cute idea. Combine multiple calendars with H=
otmail. =http://www.windowslive.com/campaign/thenewbusy?tile=multicalendar&ocid==PID28326::T:WLMTAGL:ON:WL:en-US:WM_HMP:042010_5
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4) From: John A C Despres
My first experience with iced coffee was just last week. I have a friend who
owns a wonderful roastery which is gaining in popularity. Kurt truly
respects the bean and roasts for each variety. No generic profiles there...
Lea stopped in to order some coffee to be shipped to friends and asked Kurt
for something to go I might like. He decided on an iced Ethiopia for me. A
little disappointed at receiving and iced drink, I sipped tentatively and
found I liked it a lot! Later that afternoon, I visited Kurt to tell him how
much I enjoyed it - He told me he added a tiny bit of sugar. I never knew
drinking it, but the tiny amount he added made it a wonderful cup.
Who knew I'd enjoy 1) iced coffee 2) coffee with sugar? Give it a try; if it
sucks, sink it and make another cup.
John
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5) From: Yakster
Iced coffee is sounding better and better, too bad I drank the last of my
roasted coffee this morning.
I just got an Gevalia Iced Coffee spam link that I'm not going to bother
clicking on.  I may have to try making iced coffee with the ice in the
bottom of the Chemex.
-Chris
On Mon, Jul 5, 2010 at 10:03 AM, John A C Despres wrote:
<Snip>
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6) From: Bonnie Polkinghorn
I also want to thank you all.
After reading this thread, I started making iced coffee for my drive home
from work, brewing my aeropress directly into my cup filled with 2 ice
cubes, using half the amount of water.
It is so much more scrumptious than putting the two ice cubes in after
brewing.
I was in Santa Cruz, CA last weekend, and after searching the archives,
decided to stop at Verve coffee roasters.  What a fantastic experience.  I
thank you all again for travel recommendations.
For whatever reason, I haven't been roasting for over a month and I really
miss it.  I invited some friends over later this week to watch me roast
their beans, so I'm hoping I can get back in the swing.  This is the friend
who makes and sells chocolate truffles and his Espresso truffles are topped
with beans I roast.  I trade 1/2 lb of roasted coffee for one small box of
truffles (retail $6.00).  It takes him almost 6 months to use all 1/2 lb!
Rambling on,
Bonnie P.
Santa Rosa, CA
On Mon, Jul 5, 2010 at 9:00 AM, michael brown  wrote:
<Snip>
-- rest of the post has been snipped.
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