HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee maker (15 msgs / 334 lines)
1) From: ginny
Jon:
I would ask how many pots you want to make or how much coffee you would expect to serve on any given evening.
Clearly it will change but do you have an average?
I bet that most people who homeroast will have tons of opinions btu I have discovered through my weekly
Farmers market that folks like their Columbian. Perhaps because it is a "safe" coffee to drink. If you realize that
most people who drink coffee do not drink homeroasted, hence not great coffee I would start with the easy stuff.
Are you planning to roast for the group?
ginny

2) From: Bill Cassady
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
    I really liked my Braun KF187 for that type of coffee maker.  Seldom =
use it anymore, but my girlfriend wanted something automatic since she =
can't use my espresso machine or Cona. It made quite good coffee and the =
electronics were quite good.  The new ones I can't speak to, but they =
look similar to my old one.

3) From: Bob Norton
Brauns have a nasty habit of catching fire. The Kitchen Aid drip machines
make a good pot of coffee at an almost correct temperature. I've been real
happy with mine.
****************************************
On 3/3/02Bill Cassady wrote:
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4) From: Jonathan Morris
Here are a couple of questions for anyone who might have an opinion.  My church is open weeknights for various things and we want coffee to be the theme.  So, number 1:  What is a decent, inexpensive coffee maker (has to be electric) that will serve our needs?  Has anyone tried the hamilton beach brewstation?  It would be ideal if it makes good coffee. #2: I'm new to the home roasting so I've only tried 7 origins.  Any ideas on coffees that most people will find palletable?  I have Peru chanchamayo and CR La Amistad, which I love, and my non coffee drinking wife seems to like as well.  Any others?
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5) From: Gary Bennett
Jonathan,
I can't comment on the various electric brewers, but regarding the
most palatable coffee, I find Costa Rican Tarrazu to be the most
"coffee-like" coffee. I haven't tried the specific La Amistad, but
your opinion (and your wife's) tallies with my general feeling. I
think a Costa Rican is likely to be the most widely accepted. From
there you could branch out to other centrals and then on to PNG or
Java.
Regards, Gary
On Apr 12, 2005 11:05 AM, Jonathan Morris  wrote:
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6) From: miKe mcKoffee
Concerning good "please anyone coffees". I'd suggest Panamas, Uganda, Timor 
or Columbian in that order. (I would say Kona first but suspect that's not 
in the church budget;-)
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer etc.http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm

7) From: AlChemist John
This is going to sound odd, but the Tanzanians often have a nice "coffee" 
flavor.
Sometime around 18:05 4/11/2005, Jonathan Morris typed:
<Snip>
--
John Nanci 
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.dreamsandbones.net/blog/http://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

8) From: MSMB
Can anyone tell me if a Kenmore elite coffee maker gets the water hot
enough.  I am not really about to buy one --I would buy a technivorne... if
I needed one-- but was curious.  I think it ran on 1500 watts, which, if the
device is built properly, should heat the water well enough.
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9) From: raymanowen
I do not know. You should ask any potential seller if he will refund your
money in full if the thing does not measure up to your requirements of
correct coffee brewing. Be specific that you require more than a pot of  ill
tasting warm brown water.
Rumor has it that the Technivorms are certified to brew at 200 F. That's
False.
The  TechniVorm does, indeed spit out exactly 200F water from the
distribution arm, but the water lands on coffee in a filter basket, both of
which are colder than 200, by 130. It doesn't take an MIT graduate to
realize the brewing occurs at some median temperature, much lower than the
initial 200 of the hot water.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa
Got Grinder?
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10) From: Dave
The problem with most drip brewers is that the heated water goes up a
tube that goes through the cold water reservoir. Does your Kenmore do
that? Some people modify their drip machines by adding a piece of
tubing to insulate the hot water from the cold.
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps
On Fri, May 16, 2008 at 6:33 PM, MSMB  wrote:
<Snip>
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11) From: MSMB
I have not tried the Kenmore.  I use a Presto Skandinavian and it works just
fine; water is really just right.  But I am getting ready for the day when
it stops working; that is why I am asking.

12) From: Ed Needham
That's one of the reasons to use a method that has the ability to pre-wet =
the grinds.  I've used a manual pourover for 30+ years and when you are =
doing a manual pour, you wet the grinds with brewing water, then pour to th=
e =
rim of the cone filter, then again, and stop.  The pre-wetting heats the =
grinds so the brewing temperature doesn't drop so much.  The pre-wetting =
also opens the grinds and releases quite a bit of CO2 so the coffee goodnes=
s =
can be more readily extracted.  As I've said numerous times, Chemex is my =
choice.  Melitta manual pourover would be a close second (and much cheaper =
than a Technivorm with maybe two extra steps in the process).
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

13) From: Bill
My Chemex arrives Monday from Tom.  I also have a Yama on order.  I'm pretty
excited about all of these different coffee devices.  I've been pretty
monotonous, French Press since I started drinking coffee.  I use an AP for
travel.  I'm pretty excited about using these different brewers soon.
bill in wyo
On Sat, May 17, 2008 at 10:32 PM, Ed Needham  wrote:
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14) From: Lynne
ed - i am so glad you recommended the chemex. i couldn't be happier (no,
wait - I better not say that... or i'll start wanting another piece of
coffee equipment!) was really wondering how i'd go fr. my beloved fp... but
then, i felt the same about the mokapot ... til i start to have problems
w/it :(
not sure what you mean by wetting the grinds, though.
very. very happy w/my simple chemex,
[the '70's lives on, man...]
lynne
On Sun, May 18, 2008 at 12:32 AM, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
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15) From: Paul Helbert
On Sun, May 18, 2008 at 1:19 AM, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>
The first move with either the Chemex or other pour over filter is to
pour just enough water to wet the grounds. Bloom takes place and this
small pour may help concentrate the infusing brew in the lower portion
of the filter cone so that it does not quickly get left high and dry.
The second move (after ten or fifteen seconds) is to pour it full. The
third pour is concentrated around the edge to wash the high and dry
grounds down into the main infusing suspension.
My light weight stainless steel water kettle loses its heat very
rapidly and I have found by using a rapid read thermometer in the cone
that I must pour without delay to achieve 200F in the brewing
suspension. (My altitude is about 1000 feet above mean sea level.
Folks living at higher elevations already know that they need to move
quickly from stove to the pour due to their lower boiling
temperatures).
<Snip>
-- 
Paul Helbert
Prepackaged, roasted & ground coffee,,,
Some of the worst ideas since sliced bread.
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