HomeRoast Digest


Topic: AlpenRost diagnostics (4 msgs / 102 lines)
1) From: Texinga
I've had a request to share what the guy who invented the AlpenRost had me do 
as a diagnostic test on my Alp.  So, here's the best of what I can remember.  
Also, as a disclaimer, do this at your own risk and take appropriate safety 
precautions:
1)  With the unit unplugged (off ) for at least 10 seconds to allow the 
electronics to settle, position the unit so that you can see the settings 
display while you plug the unit into a wall outlet.  You should briefly (1-2 
seconds) see the display indicate a 1 and then it will indicate an 8 when you 
first plug-in the power.
2)  Using the up/down arrow pads, scroll the setting all the way down to 1 
and then all the way up to 15 to make sure the unit is reacting to the input.
3)  This next part will involve actually operating the unit with the roasting 
drum removed, so remember to stay clear of the heating element during this 
part of the test as it will burn the heck out of you if you touch it.  The 
Alp is capable of reaching an internal temperature of 900 degrees F which is 
some serious heat. 
 
  -  Lift the lid, remove the roasting drum and set it aside.  Look to the 
area that is just right of where the drum sits.  You will see two door flaps 
that should be in the open position.  Press "Start" and you will see that the 
flaps will immediately close.  You will also see that the gear that normally 
engages the drum should be rotating.
The fan that exhausts the air should also be blowing some air, but not as 
much as it does when those flaps are open.  The heating element should be 
heating up and about 1.5 to 2 minutes after you pressed the "start" button, 
you should be able to hear the sound of the motor change in pitch as the 
heating element is cycling.  This is a very important test for those of you 
who are worried that the heat is stuck on full blast. 
-  You do not need to allow the unit to go through the full heating cycle for 
these tests, so press the "Cool" button, and you will see the flaps 
immediately open, the heating element will start to cool down and no more 
heat element cycling should occur.  A few minutes into the cooling cycle, you 
will hear and see the drum gear reverse directions which is what ejects the 
beans into the bean cup if you were doing an actual roast.
This is about all I can remember from the tests.  Here's a few other tips I 
got.  If you unplug the unit from the wall, always wait 10 seconds before 
plugging it back in.  Lack of routine cleaning is probably one of the largest 
causes of failures down the road as you use the Alp.  Anthony told me to take 
time to clean it after every use, by removing all the chaff, especially the 
chaff that collects around the burners and the exhaust fan area.  I've found 
that compressed air does a pretty good job of blowing this out, but be 
outdoors as it goes everywhere.  Maybe a small vacuum would be better.  
Anthony also said to keep those flapper doors clean from the bean oils that 
will accumulate on them and around the opening to the doors.  If you let this 
go, the doors may tend to stick rather than open properly because these oils 
can get gummy.  This is turning into a book, so I'll stop here, but hopefully 
this will be useful to some of you.  Best wishes on your roasting.

2) From: Michael Vanecek
I've found that after I'm done fussing over my coffee the burners are
cool enough to get a vacuum with a narrow nozzle in there to clean out
the chaff from around the burners and suck out the chaff tray. I also
open the flaps and vacuum that out too. Also you want to carefully
remove your exhaust vent and vacuum that out as well as the grill that
the fan is attached too. Lot's of chaff ends up there too. Periodically
I'll take a damp spong with a scrubber side (read - damp, not dripping)
and wipe down the insides to remove some of the excess oils. A little
buildup isn't bad - call it seasoning your roaster, but when it starts
to get visibly thick then wiping it down would be a Good Thing (tm). I
can just imagine using compressed air - instant cloud of chaff. Hee -
best way to distress your spouse...
Tell me - have any of you roasted on 1? Mine comes out as a City. I was
hoping for it to come out lighter on 1 to give me more of a range, but
then I can always break out the kitchen timer... I'd try using more
beans, but then the bean bucket would get overfilled and spill beans
when the roast ends...
Mike
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3) From: Jiawei Ye
Hi Mike
1 on my Alp is always light .... VERY light to the point that no bean in
my stock can pass 1st crack. My normal setting is a 6. But I suspect
that my Alp is sick recently because it kept burning my coffee....
Jiawei Ye

4) From: Michael Vanecek
That's kinda what I expected when I got my Alps. Light (Cinnamon) at 1
and past French at 15. Perhaps mine are defective after all? Mine are
and easy City at 1. If I timed it like the other guy at 14:30 then maybe
I'd have a lighter City, but if the unit itself should do that with the
settings perhaps they need to replace them...
Mike
Jiawei Ye wrote:
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